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ChokDee4213

Astronomy/Stargazing/Telescopes

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Long shot, I suppose, but I live in Buriram and want to get into the hobby of stargazing. My village has a clear view of the universe nightly, but I've never even heard of anyone interested in this stuff here.

 

Are there observatories in Isaan anywhere? Any way to locate an astronomy club (think the local Rajabhat has something)? Any places that sell telescopes in the LOS? LINE groups? Maybe resources in Korat or Bangkok? I'm at a complete loss, but any info would be appreciated if any exists. Thank you!

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Lots of telescopes for sale in BKK.

 

Google NARIT

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Learn a bit from Youtube, Google a few models, then search Lazada. Set your budget too.

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Nakhon Ratchasima has a public observatory and they have 5 telescopes on a flat roof which are open to the public.

I brought my Meade LX90 10inch telescope with me from the UK and have built my own observatory in my garden.

http://www.museumthailand.com/en/museum/Regional-Observatory-for-the-Public-Nakhon-Ratchasima

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23 minutes ago, hs0zmh said:

Nakhon Ratchasima has a public observatory and they have 5 telescopes on a flat roof which are open to the public.

I brought my Meade LX90 10inch telescope with me from the UK and have built my own observatory in my garden.

http://www.museumthailand.com/en/museum/Regional-Observatory-for-the-Public-Nakhon-Ratchasima

 

Does this museum do guided tours for children explaining the basic principles of the universe ? 

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2 hours ago, Halfaboy said:

 

Does this museum do guided tours for children explaining the basic principles of the universe ? 

Are they even aware that there is a Universe? 

 

If they teach physics like they teach English, one should better rely on podcasts from Youtube and the likes, as suggested by a member above... 

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5 hours ago, Brunolem said:

Are they even aware that there is a Universe? 

 

If they teach physics like they teach English, one should better rely on podcasts from Youtube and the likes, as suggested by a member above... 

...or... 

 

 

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10x50 for binoculars is usually the largest recommended for holding in hand.  Larger than that, you'll need a tripod to keep it stead-- not the end of the world if you don't mind a tripod.

 

I had understood there's an astronomy club in Bangkok, though I don't believe they're English-speaking if that's what you need.

 

Here's an earlier thread, though it's quite old and maybe some of the shops no longer exist: https://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/20159-telescopes-astronomy/

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19 hours ago, Zenwind said:

It sounds like you have very good Dark Skies and can see a lot.  I envy you since I live too close to greater Bangkok, and the light pollution is horrible.

 

From a lifetime of star-gazing in North America, my most basic recommendations for gear are these:  First, start with a good Star Chart (or two, or three) to navigate around the heavens.  Then, basic portable binoculars (7x50, no more powerful) for both dark sky viewing as well as basic Moon and Jupiter views; too much magnification prohibits you from seeing the low-light background stuff like nebula, star clusters, etc. 

 

Sky and Telescope magazine has a weekly email subscription that tells you what is coming into view.  See their “This Week’s Sky at a Glance.” 

 

Then, moving on to telescopes, historically there were two basic types.  First, the Refractors that zero in on Bright objects like the Moon, Jupiter and its moons, Saturn and its rings, Venus, and double-stars, etc.  In America I had a simple 60mm refractor, and I held numerous star-parties where I showed people the above objects in sharp focus at about 150x magnification.  My greatest memory with this scope was when I focused in on an object and slyly told my young niece to glance at it and tell me what she thought:  she looked, then looked up to the sky, then looked again into the eyepiece, and she asked in wide-eyed wonder, “Is that Saturn?”  She saw the rings!  Priceless. 

 

Moving on, if you are in areas with low light pollution and great dark skies, you can go with Reflecting telescopes, ones often with less magnification but with much wider apertures – i.e., “light buckets” that gather more light and allow you to see fainter objects.  These are great on dark moonless nights. 

 

(If you want more magnification for any scope, and want it to be clear, you must increase the width of the aperture.  You must gather more light.  That is why a good portable binocular is the 7x50.) 

 

If you want to spend the money, there are newer types of telescopes that combine the advantages of both the refractors and the reflectors.  They have the wide apertures like reflectors as well as the refined magnification optics of refractors.  My dream scope – if I lived in a decent dark sky area and if I could afford it – would be an 8-inch one of this type, as it would be both powerful and portable. 

 

May you always have dark skies. 

Thanks for your info, very helpful 

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Surprised there are so many stargazers on these boards! How lucky, thanks for your time and responses, you guys.

On 12/30/2018 at 1:21 PM, hs0zmh said:

Nakhon Ratchasima has a public observatory and they have 5 telescopes on a flat roof which are open to the public.

I brought my Meade LX90 10inch telescope with me from the UK and have built my own observatory in my garden.

http://www.museumthailand.com/en/museum/Regional-Observatory-for-the-Public-Nakhon-Ratchasima

YES! Exactly what I was hoping for! Road trip time, thank you so much for the info.

On 12/30/2018 at 8:58 PM, Zenwind said:

It sounds like you have very good Dark Skies and can see a lot.  I envy you since I live too close to greater Bangkok, and the light pollution is horrible.

 

From a lifetime of star-gazing in North America, my most basic recommendations for gear are these:  First, start with a good Star Chart (or two, or three) to navigate around the heavens.  Then, basic portable binoculars (7x50, no more powerful) for both dark sky viewing as well as basic Moon and Jupiter views; too much magnification prohibits you from seeing the low-light background stuff like nebula, star clusters, etc. 

 

Sky and Telescope magazine has a weekly email subscription that tells you what is coming into view.  See their “This Week’s Sky at a Glance.” 

 

Then, moving on to telescopes, historically there were two basic types.  First, the Refractors that zero in on Bright objects like the Moon, Jupiter and its moons, Saturn and its rings, Venus, and double-stars, etc.  In America I had a simple 60mm refractor, and I held numerous star-parties where I showed people the above objects in sharp focus at about 150x magnification.  My greatest memory with this scope was when I focused in on an object and slyly told my young niece to glance at it and tell me what she thought:  she looked, then looked up to the sky, then looked again into the eyepiece, and she asked in wide-eyed wonder, “Is that Saturn?”  She saw the rings!  Priceless. 

 

Moving on, if you are in areas with low light pollution and great dark skies, you can go with Reflecting telescopes, ones often with less magnification but with much wider apertures – i.e., “light buckets” that gather more light and allow you to see fainter objects.  These are great on dark moonless nights. 

 

(If you want more magnification for any scope, and want it to be clear, you must increase the width of the aperture.  You must gather more light.  That is why a good portable binocular is the 7x50.) 

 

If you want to spend the money, there are newer types of telescopes that combine the advantages of both the refractors and the reflectors.  They have the wide apertures like reflectors as well as the refined magnification optics of refractors.  My dream scope – if I lived in a decent dark sky area and if I could afford it – would be an 8-inch one of this type, as it would be both powerful and portable. 

 

May you always have dark skies. 

Thank you for the info as well!

Also, curious of your opinion: the village is 1km away and has a handful of street lights. There is also a major highway 2-3km away with lots of street lighting (and one of the big gas station/rest stop). I think save the gas station, the lights are all pointed downward. About 1 radial km without much light, however. Would you consider refractive, reflective, or compound? Would using Binoculars reveal this to me?

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Choi Dee did you have any luck in your astronomy adventures yet? I am based in Chiangmai and have been bitten by the Astro bug.. as for Telescopes be careful.. many of those you see on Lazada are just toys.. not serious Astro gear. Depending on your needs I am happy to advise you. Cheers and clear skies..Greg

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