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BANGKOK 25 March 2019 06:09

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2 minutes ago, KittenKong said:

That was a picture I found, but the recipe I have quoted a couple of times on this thread will produce a loaf like that if it is baked in an oven with additional steam or a Dutch oven. I've done them in my own oven in a Pyrex bowl with a lid.

The problem with a bread machine is that you simply cant make a loaf like that in one, regardless of what recipe you follow.

I have been using a cast iron pot in the oven with some success. I haven't tried pyrex but I do have a few different shapes and sizes that I can try.

 

Just yesterday, I made some nice bread rolls by just using two deep aluminium baking trays from Makro (one inverted on top of the other, and secured with a couple of bulldog clips). The results were far better than just normal oven baking, even though I used the exact same recipe.

 

The other thing that has improved my baking recently is buying an oven thermometer. I found that my oven was incorrect by about 10-15 degrees C (too cool). Since making some adjustments I found that my bread and, especially, my pastry and Yorkshire pudding has improved a lot.

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Like the idea of using the two trays and will give it a try,

With regards to temperature the values are no longer visible on my oven. However i have learnt roughly where the values are but I do have a hot spot at the front of the oven. The two trays idea might minimise the hot spot problem. 

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Regarding the Morries Breadmaker, does it have a removable paddle which can be removed before the baking period starts?

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On 1/29/2019 at 8:00 AM, wgdanson said:

Thanks for advice. I used a French recipe, 500 flour, 300 room temp water, 1 tsp each yeast & salt. Mix, leave 45 mins then knead a bit, leave 45 mins and knead again ...4 times. Shape and bake. Will try again tomorrow when I have struggled thru eating the tough ones!

My take: First of all you use a French recipe. I guess this is not a recipe for fluffy rolls but more for crispy ones or baguettes. You do not knead the dough as you state, but you stretch and fold the dough. So you should do that and not knead the dough, you destroy the sponteneous gluten that develop during those waiting times. Do you use bread flour?
Use ice cold water 2 degr. C.; you are not in France but in this climate; A little more water can do as you have 60% to the flour and that's ok for whole loaves but not for this use.

Best is if you have all your ingredients cooled. The end goal for the dough is at least lower than 28 C.

 

If you didn't use a pre dough like a poolish, i guess the yeast is way to low. You use 3 grams of yeast to half a kilo flour. That's only 0.6%!! Totally insufficient!! You will be much better of with at least double that weight.

 

But, I have a feeling that you are using a method that you are not familiar with. Am I right?

 

Hope this helps.

 

BTW, mixing the yeast with the salt is more of a fairy tale. Ok, don't just mix them up as such, but in a 1 kilo dough it doesn't make much sense. Once the dough is mixed/kneaded, salt and yeast are still at least another 2 hours in the dough while rising. Debunked.

You don't put salt in a pre dough as that sits normally overnight to develop.

 

 

 

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On 1/30/2019 at 11:04 AM, stoutfella said:

Regarding the Morries Breadmaker, does it have a removable paddle which can be removed before the baking period starts?

Yes it does.

As long as you can work out the correct moment to do it.

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On 2/4/2019 at 6:57 PM, hugocnx said:

TW, mixing the yeast with the salt is more of a fairy tale. Ok, don't just mix them up as such, but in a 1 kilo dough it doesn't make much sense. Once the dough is mixed/kneaded, salt and yeast are still at least another 2 hours in the dough while rising. Debunked.

Salt on yeast will kill it stone dead. The "fairy tale" is all about not letting concentrated salt get into contact with the yeast. So all you need to do is to mix the salt well with the flour before it is put in contact with the yeast, or at least spread the salt and the flour about well in the bowl and mix immediately. Bread machines usually recommend putting the yeast on one side and the salt on the other for this reason.

 

Either way, it is not a myth.

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18 hours ago, KittenKong said:

Salt on yeast will kill it stone dead. The "fairy tale" is all about not letting concentrated salt get into contact with the yeast. So all you need to do is to mix the salt well with the flour before it is put in contact with the yeast, or at least spread the salt and the flour about well in the bowl and mix immediately. Bread machines usually recommend putting the yeast on one side and the salt on the other for this reason.

 

Either way, it is not a myth.

Did I say anything different?

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Justin Side,  many thanks for that information. It looks like I will have some experimenting to do.

 

I was unable to reply to you directly as I can't see a way to do that.

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On 2/6/2019 at 4:03 PM, hugocnx said:

Did I say anything different?

To me you appeared to be saying the opposite.

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7 hours ago, KittenKong said:

To me you appeared to be saying the opposite.

I said >don't just mix them up as such<

Maybe that wasn't perfect English, but it meant that you do not put them on top of each other in your kneading bowl. Anyways, 10 seconds later salt and yeast are in bed together whether they like it or not.

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55 minutes ago, hugocnx said:

Maybe that wasn't perfect English, but it meant that you do not put them on top of each other in your kneading bowl.

I see. I thought you were saying the opposite. Yes, as long as you dont put one right on top of the other then it will be fine. All bread recipes I have seen say to avoid putting them together in concentrated form.

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Just done three large bread cakes, is there a name for this type of bread, can't find anything like them on the internet.

I just use my basic recipe, but have started adding two eggs which gives the crust a lovely brown colour.

IMG_20190209_160125.jpg

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58 minutes ago, vogie said:

Just done three large bread cakes, is there a name for this type of bread, can't find anything like them on the internet.

I just use my basic recipe, but have started adding two eggs which gives the crust a lovely brown colour.

IMG_20190209_160125.jpg

I haven't put eggs in my bread dough for a long time. I might give that a try sometime.

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On 2/9/2019 at 4:18 PM, vogie said:

Just done three large bread cakes, is there a name for this type of bread, can't find anything like them on the internet.

I just use my basic recipe, but have started adding two eggs which gives the crust a lovely brown colour.

IMG_20190209_160125.jpg

English Mega Rolls. English stands for the faint color.

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