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Fear of a repeat: What happened the last time a tropical storm hit Thailand

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Fear of a repeat: What happened the last time a tropical storm hit Thailand

 

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As a tropical storm threatened to hit Thailand for the first time in more than 50 years a Facebook post explained what happened in 1962. 

 

Thailand suffered a huge disaster when tropical storm Harriet hit the gulf of Thailand coast from Prajuab Khiri Khan to Narathiwat. 

 

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The Nakhon Sri Thammarat page said that the center of the storm was in that province. The storm was 300 kilometers across and had winds of 95 kmph. 

 

There was no warning system in place when the storm hit on October 25th 1962. 

 

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Some 911 people died and 142 were missing. Homes completely destroyed came to 22,000 with a further 50,000 partially damaged. 

 

Many people were injured and 16,000 people were made homeless. 

 

The storm had originated in the South China sea and off Japan and had moved to the Gulf. 

 

Storm warnings are in place this week as tropical storm Pabuk threatens to cause havoc in the south. 

 

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-- © Copyright Thai Visa News 2019-01-03

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Posted (edited)

thank buddha they build houses with concrete now.

 

 

 

 

Edited by GeorgeCross

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WTPN31 PGTW 030300 COR
MSGID/GENADMIN/JOINT TYPHOON WRNCEN PEARL HARBOR HI//
SUBJ/TROPICAL CYCLONE WARNING CORRECTED//
RMKS/   

1. TROPICAL STORM 36W (PABUK) WARNING NR 012 CORRECTED   
   01 ACTIVE TROPICAL CYCLONE IN NORTHWESTPAC
   MAX SUSTAINED WINDS BASED ON ONE-MINUTE AVERAGE

    ---
   WARNING POSITION:
   030000Z --- NEAR 6.0N 105.3E
     MOVEMENT PAST SIX HOURS - 260 DEGREES AT 07 KTS
     POSITION ACCURATE TO WITHIN 060 NM
     POSITION BASED ON CENTER LOCATED BY SATELLITE
   PRESENT WIND DISTRIBUTION:
   MAX SUSTAINED WINDS - 040 KT, GUSTS 050 KT
   WIND RADII VALID OVER OPEN WATER ONLY
   
   FORECASTS:
   12 HRS, VALID AT:
   031200Z --- 6.3N 104.0E
   MAX SUSTAINED WINDS - 040 KT, GUSTS 050 KT
   
    ---
   24 HRS, VALID AT:
   040000Z --- 7.2N 102.2E
   MAX SUSTAINED WINDS - 045 KT, GUSTS 055 KT
      
    ---
   36 HRS, VALID AT:
   041200Z --- 8.0N 100.3E
   MAX SUSTAINED WINDS - 050 KT, GUSTS 065 KT
     
      ---
   EXTENDED OUTLOOK:
   48 HRS, VALID AT:
   050000Z --- 8.7N 98.6E
   MAX SUSTAINED WINDS - 040 KT, GUSTS 050 KT
   
   72 HRS, VALID AT:
   060000Z --- 10.6N 95.1E
   MAX SUSTAINED WINDS - 045 KT, GUSTS 055 KT
   
   LONG RANGE OUTLOOK:
    ---
   96 HRS, VALID AT:
   070000Z --- 13.0N 92.4E
   MAX SUSTAINED WINDS - 035 KT, GUSTS 045 KT
   
    ---
   120 HRS, VALID AT:
   080000Z --- 15.9N 90.8
   MAX SUSTAINED WINDS - 025 KT, GUSTS 035 KT
  
    ---

REMARKS:
030300Z POSITION NEAR 6.1N 105.0E.
TROPICAL STORM 36W (PABUK), LOCATED APPROXIMATELY 300 NM SOUTH-
SOUTHWEST OF HO CHI MINH CITY, VI, HAS TRACKED WESTWARD AT 07
KNOTS OVER THE PAST SIX HOURS. MAXIMUM SIGNIFICANT WAVE HEIGHT 
AT 030000Z IS 17 FEET. NEXT WARNINGS AT 030900Z, 031500Z, 
032100Z AND 040300Z.
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Typhoon Gay was a bad one, this one is very "late" in the year!

Typhoon Gay, also known as the Kavali Cyclone of 1989,[1] was a small but powerful tropical cyclone that caused more than 800 fatalities in and around the Gulf of Thailand in November 1989. The worst typhoon to affect the Malay Peninsula in 35 years, Gay originated from a monsoon trough over the Gulf of Thailand in early-November. Owing to favorable atmospheric conditions, the storm rapidly intensified, attaining winds of more than 120 km/h (75 mph) by 3 November.[nb 1] Later that day, Gay became the first typhoon since 1891 to make landfall in Thailand, striking Chumphon Province with winds of 185 km/h (115 mph). The small storm emerged into the Bay of Bengal and gradually reorganized over the following days as it approached southeastern India. On 8 November, Gay attained its peak intensity as a Category 5–equivalent cyclone with winds of 260 km/h (160 mph). The typhoon then moved ashore near Kavali, Andhra Pradesh. Rapid weakening ensued inland, and Gay dissipated over Maharashtra early on 10 November.

The typhoon's rapid development took hundreds of vessels in the Gulf of Thailand by surprise, leading to 275 offshore fatalities. Of these, 91 occurred after an oil drilling ship, the Seacrest, capsized amid 6–11 m (20–36 ft) swells. Across the Malay Peninsula, 588 people died from various storm-related incidents. Several towns in coastal Chumphon were destroyed. Losses throughout Thailand totaled ฿11 billion (US$497 million).[nb 2] Striking India as a powerful cyclone, Gay damaged or destroyed about 20,000 homes in Andhra Pradesh, leaving 100,000 people homeless. In that country, 69 deaths and 410 million (US$25.3 million) in damage were attributed to Gay.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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looks like max wind speed at land fall. which is 50 knots with 65 knot gusts.  One knot equals 1.852 KPH. So 50 knots per hour X 1.852 equals 92.6 KPH or 57.53 MPH winds.

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this is one hour ago:

 

Capfffture.JPG

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1 hour ago, GeorgeCross said:

thank buddha they build houses with concrete now.

 

 

 

 

It will still suck the tiles off your roof.

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It was certainly a very poorly named Typhoon that claimed a lot of lives, some of whom I knew well 😞 

After this one they started evacuating the oil facilities in the GOT when a storm was confirmed incoming, a costly lesson was learnt.

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Not sure why they are calling this storm a "cyclone". The latest synoptic(06 UTC midday) is showing the cell off the coast of Kotabharu Malaysia. The maximum wind speed is posted @ 35 knots, the central pressure of 1004 hPa. 

A severe tropical storm is designated as a tropical cyclone when it reaches wind speeds of 64 knots (118 km/h, 74 mph)

.

The maximum wind speed shown at Prachuap Kiri Khan is from the north at 25 knots. There may well be some rain associated with it, but no way this is a 'cyclone'

 

Maybe TAT have become involved!!

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In Thailand, the news cycle is led by government ministers not by facts.

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5 hours ago, GeorgeCross said:

thank buddha they build houses with concrete now.

 

 

 

 

And that they screw the rooftiles.....speaking of those...last month we heard a huge thunderlike noise very close so i started inspecting it...but it took me 10 minutes to find what caused it....it was the corner rooftile from my neighbour which fell down (birdnest under it)..it had fallen on his tile roof (8 tiles broken) and then on his carport which dented...

 

I asked my neighbour if he heard something...no not really he said!!! He even didn't hear it! But he had a hole in his roof, his livingroom was underneath it....so lucky.

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