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BANGKOK 26 April 2019 01:24
octagon

Root password stopped working

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I set up Linux Mint on my laptop, and was successful.

 

The only bug I have is that my root password stopped working for some reason. It was working at first after the installation, but doesn't authenticate any longer.

 

Login to Mint after reboot using the password works, however. 

 

Any ideas on what to do?

 

Thank you.

 

J Daubman

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Caps Lock on (or off)?

 

Keyboard layout changed (special characters move around)?

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Posted (edited)

Caps lock off, and no keyboard layout changed.

 

Luckily this problem started after I installed all the updates and drivers, but still very annoying when I want to install a program and my root password doesn't work.

Edited by octagon

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27 minutes ago, octagon said:

The only bug I have is that my root password stopped working for some reason.

I don't understand your problem.  You haven't made it clear.  

 

Are you saying that you cannot login as root?  Stop making me guess.

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Try this: 

$ sudo -i  and then enter your password.

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1 minute ago, Vacuum said:

Try this: 


$ sudo -i  and then enter your password.

It's not clear if he is trying to assume superuser status or login as root.

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Posted (edited)
13 minutes ago, Vacuum said:

Try this: 


$ sudo -i  and then enter your password.

Yeah, I think this will work. I will give it a try. The Linux installation is actually on a friend's laptop, so will have to try this when I see him again.

 

One other question, is the Linux password I set up during installation the same as the root password they ask for when making changes to my machine?

 

Thanks.

Edited by octagon

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7 hours ago, octagon said:

Yeah, I think this will work. I will give it a try. The Linux installation is actually on a friend's laptop, so will have to try this when I see him again.

 

One other question, is the Linux password I set up during installation the same as the root password they ask for when making changes to my machine?

 

Thanks.

No.

 

If you login with a name other than "root," you are only logging in as a user, not as ROOT.

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Thanks, Tony. There's still some learning for me on using Linux, but it sure beats Micro-**cking-soft!

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2 hours ago, octagon said:

Thanks, Tony. There's still some learning for me on using Linux, but it sure beats Micro-**cking-soft!

YouTube has thousands of videos that can teach you how to use Linux. Use them.

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3 hours ago, TonyClifton said:

YouTube has thousands of videos that can teach you how to use Linux. Use them.

Believe me, I have looked at dozens of videos out there on Linux. Most of it is crap and way too technical for me. I have learned enough to at least get Linux installed on a computer and set up and customized the way i like it with a nice theme, icon pack, Google fonts, etc. That's all I need to know how to do for now.

 

Like the Mark Twain quote, BTW.

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On 1/3/2019 at 11:10 PM, octagon said:

Yeah, I think this will work. I will give it a try. The Linux installation is actually on a friend's laptop, so will have to try this when I see him again.

 

One other question, is the Linux password I set up during installation the same as the root password they ask for when making changes to my machine?

 

Thanks.

I realize this is a late reply, but by default, the 'root' account on a Linux Mint system is disabled; thus the account has no password.

 

A regular user account, which has the appropriate 'sudo' privileges, can elevate their status to make system changes, such as installing new software, performing software updates, or even opening an interactive session (using sudo -i).

 

Most home/personal computers rely on two factor authentication; user ID and password. If the 'root' account were enabled, then a hacker would only have to focus on cracking the password. When I used to have my SSHD (Secure Shell Daemon) listening on port 22 and reachable from the outside world through my modem/router, hackers from all places around the world would attempt to login as 'root' or 'admin'. Since neither account exists, the Fail2Ban app I have installed would eventually block any further attempts of these jokers from connecting to my system.

 

After being annoyed one too many times, I set up my SSHD to listen on a different port. Problem solved! No more hacking attempts, and no more emails telling me of a failed attempt.

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Thanks for this useful information Gumball. I'll definitely install the Fail2Ban app.

 

The specific problem my friend is having is that when he tries to install updates on his Linux Mint system, the password I set up for him doesn't authenticate for some reason. Using the same password when logging in after computer starts up, I have no problem.

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Can your friend successfully invoke the following command using his account?

$ sudo -i

If not, then your friend's account either may not be a 'sudoer' or may simply have limited admin privileges that do not allow for adding new software, making system updates, or even jumping into interactive mode. You can confirm if this user is part of the sudo group or not by running this command:

$ id -Gn

 

This command should generate output similar to this:

uid=1000(my-user-id) gid=1000(my-group) groups=1000(my-group),4(adm),24(cdrom),27(sudo),30(dip),46(plu
gdev),113(lpadmin),127(sambashare)

Note that the info above indicates that the user is part of the 'sudo' group (among others).
 

Does this system perhaps have another user account that does have 'sudo' privileges? You seemed to imply this by indicating that you would install Fail2Ban (which, btw, probably is not necessary unless you have exposed this system to external access).

 

If such an account exists, you can use it to grant your friend sudo privileges as well; use this command, where you would substitute user2 with the appropriate user-id your friend uses:

$ sudo usermod -a -G sudo user2

 

You could also be craftier by limiting which sudo commands your friend can invoke; this could be helpful in preventing them from going hog-wild with the system and potentially shooting themselves in the foot.

 

Here's some fun reading: https://www.garron.me/en/linux/visudo-command-sudoers-file-sudo-default-editor.html

 

 

Edited by Gumballl

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