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BANGKOK 23 January 2019 21:12
luther

Travel Insurance for Trip to the US

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I'm curious if there is anyone who has...

bought travel insurance,

gone to the US,

had a medical emergency,

and successfully filed a claim.

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IMG Patriot Platinum gets scathing reviews.

I've used World Nomads in the past and will probably go with them, but not with any confidence.

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8 minutes ago, luther said:

IMG Patriot Platinum gets scathing reviews.

I've used World Nomads in the past and will probably go with them, but not with any confidence.

 

Where are the IMG scathing reviews you're referring to?  From what I read at the time, IMG seems to be a pretty well regarded health policy provider.

 

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Are you a us citizen? As many policies inc World Nomads will not insure US citizens for travel to the US.

 

IMG Patriot America Plus (not Patriot Platinum, as that is for US citizens travelling outside the US) specifically covers non-US residents (including US citizens who live abroad) travelling to the US.

 

I got it for several years until I obtained Medicare. But never needed to make a claim.

 

If nto a US citizen, World Nomads is a solid company but they will not insure age 65 and over.

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depending on the level of the emergency, in Florida anyway there are many walk in clinics where one immediately sees a real doctor, can get a prescription, x rays, get broken bones set, etc. for reasonable prices. In general Emergency Rooms affiliated with and inside Hospitals are much more price gougy.

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1 minute ago, gk10002000 said:

depending on the level of the emergency, in Florida anyway there are many walk in clinics where one immediately sees a real doctor, can get a prescription, x rays, get broken bones set, etc. for reasonable prices. In general Emergency Rooms affiliated with and inside Hospitals are much more price gougy.

 

A few weeks back, my father in a California suburb had an ailment over the weekend where his weekday regular doctor wasn't available, but he also didn't think it merited going to an emergency room. So after checking with his Medicare plan, he found they had a couple "urgent care" clinics in his town that he could visit and be covered.

 

He called up one nearby, and they told him to see a doctor at their "urgent care" on the weekend was going to require a 2-4 hour wait and no appointments available, walk-in only.  That's the farthest from anything I'd call "urgent care" that I've ever heard!!!!

 

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17 hours ago, Sheryl said:

Are you a us citizen? As many policies inc World Nomads will not insure US citizens for travel to the US.

 

IMG Patriot America Plus (not Patriot Platinum, as that is for US citizens travelling outside the US) specifically covers non-US residents (including US citizens who live abroad) travelling to the US.

 

I got it for several years until I obtained Medicare. But never needed to make a claim.

 

If nto a US citizen, World Nomads is a solid company but they will not insure age 65 and over.

I am an American citizen, but a resident of Thailand. World Nomads will insure me.

 

It's easy to find a variety of sites reviewing travel insurance plans by Googling something like "IMG America Plus reviews." If you filter out the vast majority of people who never made a claim.  If you read the ones where people had to deal with the company or make a claim, then the ratings average is in the one or two star range.

 

 

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Note carefully very very carefully the fine print. For example, here's how World Nomads defines a "resident":

The country you select as your country of residence is the country where you: are a citizen or legal resident; and have unrestricted right of entry; and have access to long-term medical care, particularly should you require a medical repatriation under this policy; and have your residential address as shown on your Certificate of Insurance.

I don't know whether someone living in Thailand on an annual retirement visa, say, would be regarded as a "resident" under this definition, especially the "unrestricted right of entry" qualification. But I do know that when reading insurance policies, it's safest to assume the insurance company will take the most restrictive reading possible.

https://products-api.worldnomads.com/v1/regulatoryWordingDocuments/508

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Posted (edited)
On 1/5/2019 at 1:45 PM, Sheryl said:

Are you a us citizen? As many policies inc World Nomads will not insure US citizens for travel to the US.

 

IMG Patriot America Plus (not Patriot Platinum, as that is for US citizens travelling outside the US) specifically covers non-US residents (including US citizens who live abroad) travelling to the US.

 

 

Sheryl, IMG has different policies for different audiences, including one for Americans living abroad who plan to travel back to the U.S. for limited periods of time, and another for Thai citizens who simply want to travel to the U.S.  I've gone over that with them personally in excruciating detail the past two years, so I'm very clear on that point.

 

Patriot America Plus is the name of their travel insurance policy for Thai or other foreign citizens who want to visit the U.S.

 

Patriot Platinum International with citizenship return rider (the part that covers Americans coming back to the U.S. temporarily) is the one for U.S. expats traveling back to the U.S.

 

Admittedly, one of the things that's confusing about IMG is that they have so many different varieties of policies, and originally, I couldn't tell for certain which ones fit our specific needs -- a U.S. citizen living in Thailand traveling back to the U.S., accompanied by his Thai wife.  The two policies I mentioned above were those that IMG specifically directed for my and my wife's individual/different situations.

 

As for World Nomads, as a U.S. citizen LIVING in Thailand, I've had coverage from them for trips back to the U.S.  I believe, their focus is where you RESIDE or have resided (being Thailand), not what is your legal citizenship. For that policy, you do have to declare to them that you have some core health insurance policy coverage in Thailand.

 

Edited by TallGuyJohninBKK

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2 hours ago, taxout said:

Note carefully very very carefully the fine print. For example, here's how World Nomads defines a "resident":

The country you select as your country of residence is the country where you: are a citizen or legal resident; and have unrestricted right of entry; and have access to long-term medical care, particularly should you require a medical repatriation under this policy; and have your residential address as shown on your Certificate of Insurance.

I don't know whether someone living in Thailand on an annual retirement visa, say, would be regarded as a "resident" under this definition, especially the "unrestricted right of entry" qualification. But I do know that when reading insurance policies, it's safest to assume the insurance company will take the most restrictive reading possible.

https://products-api.worldnomads.com/v1/regulatoryWordingDocuments/508

 

I'm a legal resident of Thailand via visa originally and now extension of stay.

I have unrestricted right of entry, year by year.

I have access to long term medical care in Thailand via my Thai medical insurance policy.

My one and only residence is in Thailand.

 

I think that meets their criteria as you've listed them above.

 

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If I were an insurance company lawyer facing a big claim from you, I'd certainly argue that a re-entry permit does not give you an "unrestricted right" to enter Thailand.

 

Indeed, the question was discussed recently here:

 

https://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/1065868-is-it-possible-to-be-denied-entry-at-an-airport-with-a-valid-re-entry-permit/

 

Of course words are just words and everyone could argue back and forth what the policy words mean in that context. Only a court would have the final say.

 

But as I said, insurance companies are shameless when it comes to using the fine print against claims. Utterly shameless. And those two words "unrestricted right" are in there for a reason: to be used to deny a claim.

 

Presumably this only becomes an issue when you make a big claim, when it's worth the insurance company's time to go through your background with a fine-tooth comb. But it's when you have a big claim that insurance becomes really important.

 

Having insurance provides great peace of mind. Until you read the policy.

 

 

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I usually purchase AIG Travel Guard.  I haven't filed any claims but I have been happy with their pricing and options.

 

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When I still lived in Thailand full time we had Bupa health insurance, and bought their travel insurance for my annual trips back home.

 

Now I never had any major accidents or hospitalizations, but I did make claims for an eye infection and a broken leg.....stupid (old fart) skiing accident, both of which they paid without issue.

 

Can't remember who Bupa Thailand is anymore, but unlikely to have changed that much

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