Jump to content
Planned Temporary Forum Outage Friday 18th January from 21:00 Read more... ×
BANGKOK 19 January 2019 06:46
snoop1130

Brexit: Germany says not time to discuss Article 50 extension

Recommended Posts

3 hours ago, bristolboy said:

Yes, the massively powerful AFD may push for an exit from the EU. That will surely terrify the more than 80 percent of the electorate who want no part of that.

That’s what the establishment thought of UKIP just 15yrs ago.

The rest is history.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Dene16 said:

I agree, however the continued migration to the UK had to stop before it was too late to turn the clock back. 

The majority of migrants to the UK come from outside the EU. Leaving the EU will do nothing to stem that tide.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, smedly said:

you are making a common error regarding UK trade with the EU 27, 90% of it actually only involves 6 of the 27 and those 6 rely heavily on UK trade

Simples, divide by 6 instead of 27, same principal applies.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, bristolboy said:

It's not as bad as all that. It's bad, but not that bad. The EU in toto has a GDP of about 18 trillion dollars. The UK's share is about 2.6 trillion dollars. Which means that a about 14 percent of the EU's GDP belongs to the UK. This doesn't track exactly with the amount of trade between the UK and the rest of the EU but it does give a clearer idea of their relative strengths.

I was using hypothetical figures. Put your own figures in and the same principal applied. Britain will suffer far more than any one individual European country.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, bristolboy said:

Well, I ran the figures for Germany and their exports to the UK account for about 2.75 percent of GDP. So that's a considerable figure. 

but all trade wont stop,only some and germany wont lose 100000s of jobs like the UK,it will gain when many companies lose,this will offset any slight trade loses

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, Spidey said:

The majority of migrants to the UK come from outside the EU. Leaving the EU will do nothing to stem that tide.

correct ive been clocking how many africans there are working in low paid care home jobs,all nowt to do with the EU,a british made problem as usual

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

This whole arguement ignores the point that Brexit, and the debate which surrounds it, covers a wide range of aspects of the UK's membership/departure from the EU. It focuses on mathematics, which are based on a variety of inexact statistics, and the mathematical processes applied seem to vary depending on which result the person doing the maths wishes to achieve! One of the most vociferous arguers has even declared that his conclusions are based on hypothetical figures! That declaration incidentally came some posts after he declared that anyone who disagrees with him (voted to leave) was a "knob"! Hypothetically speaking "a knob" I presume.

 

There is a wider point - this debate has been so poisoned by this sort of suggestion; we have different views so therefore you are "a knob", that there is little point in continuing, whether or not the statistics upon which arguments are based are hypothetical or not! Sad.

Edited by JAG
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Spidey said:

No. The culprits are the knobs who voted leave. From the beginning, we were always going to end up in this mess no matter who did the negotiating on the British side.

 

Did you really think that the rest of the EU membership were going to let us leave quietly and amicably?

Wrong. The problem has been created by UK's clueless civil service negotiators. Or maybe they were under orders to be clueless ?

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
47 minutes ago, Thingamabob said:

Wrong. The problem has been created by UK's clueless civil service negotiators. Or maybe they were under orders to be clueless ?

As Barnier & Co. held all the cards and we held none, it was clear, even before the vote, that they were going to make it as onerous as possible for us to leave the EU, as punishment for having the temerity to leave and as a salutary warning to any other country that may be thinking of leaving.

 

The British negotiators were on a hiding to nothing. What tools did they have to negotiate with?

Edited by Spidey

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, JAG said:

Cash, spondoolucks, dosh, wompah...

 

A major concern (perhaps the major concern) for the EU was the financial hole left by the UK's departure. We rather opened the whole negotiations by stating that we were prepared to give them a remarkable amount of money, pretty well no matter what conditions they sought to apply.

Actually, the figure was almost halved from the Eu's opening gambit. Also, a considerable amount of that was what we were contractually obliged to honour, no matter what the outcome of negotiations.

 

We will still end up shelling out billions even with a no deal Brexit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Spidey said:

How do you figure that? Hypothetically, if all trade stops between us and Europe, we lose all of our trade, each member country loses only 1/27th of it's trade. Do the maths, we lose out far more than any one European country. Simples!

What do you mean by 'Simples'?  Your mail is not True. 39% of UK exports (and falling) go via the European ports with a large percentage upto 6% going on in transit.  The UK trade mainly with the northern countries, very little with the southern countries who are heavily in debt or under management by EU managers.   Look at this way the total % of Exports are  in the region of 10% of UK GDP.  Consequently exports to the EU are important but are less than 4% of the total.  Maths eh? 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

Sponsors
×