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BANGKOK 19 January 2019 06:44
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Carmaker Rolls-Royce urges UK's May to avoid a hard Brexit

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4 minutes ago, bomber said:

all well paid and all will receive nice pensions,perhaps this is where the tories should recoup some extra cash to pay of the nations debt,although it wont happen as JC will add to it,doomsday awaits

Not well paid, they have received derisory pay rises since the Torys came to power, for several years zero. Pensions are nowhere near as good as those in private professions. I'm glad you think that the NHS workers don't deserve the money they get, I hope you never need their services.

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20 minutes ago, Spidey said:

Not well paid, they have received derisory pay rises since the Torys came to power, for several years zero. Pensions are nowhere near as good as those in private professions. I'm glad you think that the NHS workers don't deserve the money they get, I hope you never need their services.

there are no pensions as good in the private sector unless you are very lucky and there is nothing to stop a NHS worker taking a gamble on one if they so wished,but i bet less than 1% do,the NHS is still 99.9% a job for life,the private sector is anything but.

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1 hour ago, Joinaman said:

i agree, but let them explain, Exactly how this will hamper their exports or imports

i don't know like many others, but i hear crap coming from many people all the time who speak crap, without facts

have they stock piled materials, instead of relying on Just in time, have they organised how exports and imports can be simplified  like the existing, or do we have foreign owned companies talking bullshit again

facts, not fiction would be very nice

if i say that if we remain, it will cost every working man more than 3,00 pounds a year extra, will you remainers believe me and why not

Ok. Let's try to break the extra expenses in the way it's easy to understand. Please add and correct as I'm going to make mistakes. 

 

1) Import / export taxes or tariffs means that each time products are moved between UK/EU border, the governments will tax these products. Add some extra money to be paid for people or agencies who do the paperwork. Add some extra costs for the customs work as those people don't work for free at freezy harbours. 

 

2) Stockpiling material is mandatory if the supply chain is not working as it used to work. 

 

This means that the factories have to buy land, if they don't have enough. They have to build new storage facilities. They have to hire people to take care of the storage facilities and people to move stuff around.. from storage to the factories.

 

They also have to hire guards for the security, if the factory is not working 24/7

 

3) When the border bureaucracy is increased, it means that the transfer time for the lorries is going to be a lot longer than it used to be. Lorry companies must make profit or they die. Therefore the price of transportation from EU to UK and the other way around will increase. 

 

All of these add extra costs to the final product - the shiny new car. 

 

Now if these extra costs are for example 20% and the company wishes to compete with the others, it's likely that they have to decrease their prices by that 20% or simply sell a lot less cars. 

 

Companies do calculate the whole costs and profits of their factories. While it costs a lot to relocate a factory to another country, there is a breaking point, when it wiser to do the move now, even if it hurts quite a lot. 

 

 

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2 hours ago, guest879 said:

the people have decided. they need to get a leader to sort out a decent deal. there may be some short term pain but England can take back control from the failing EU. it is hard to decide which leader is worse, May or Merkel. Trudeau would beat them both if he was in the running.

Are you still living in Disney's World? 

Wake up! 

 

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11 minutes ago, oilinki said:

Ok. Let's try to break the extra expenses in the way it's easy to understand. Please add and correct as I'm going to make mistakes. 

 

1) Import / export taxes or tariffs means that each time products are moved between UK/EU border, the governments will tax these products. Add some extra money to be paid for people or agencies who do the paperwork. Add some extra costs for the customs work as those people don't work for free at freezy harbours. 

 

2) Stockpiling material is mandatory if the supply chain is not working as it used to work. 

 

This means that the factories have to buy land, if they don't have enough. They have to build new storage facilities. They have to hire people to take care of the storage facilities and people to move stuff around.. from storage to the factories.

 

They also have to hire guards for the security, if the factory is not working 24/7

 

3) When the border bureaucracy is increased, it means that the transfer time for the lorries is going to be a lot longer than it used to be. Lorry companies must make profit or they die. Therefore the price of transportation from EU to UK and the other way around will increase. 

 

All of these add extra costs to the final product - the shiny new car. 

 

Now if these extra costs are for example 20% and the company wishes to compete with the others, it's likely that they have to decrease their prices by that 20% or simply sell a lot less cars. 

 

Companies do calculate the whole costs and profits of their factories. While it costs a lot to relocate a factory to another country, there is a breaking point, when it wiser to do the move now, even if it hurts quite a lot. 

 

 

You're quite right in general. Rolls Royce is a special case since for marketing reasons the cachet of its tradition is important in selling the product. That said, the heart of the machine, the engine and some other parts are actually manufactured by BMW in Germany.

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32 minutes ago, bristolboy said:

You're quite right in general. Rolls Royce is a special case since for marketing reasons the cachet of its tradition is important in selling the product. That said, the heart of the machine, the engine and some other parts are actually manufactured by BMW in Germany.

I was talking in general when it comes to just in time businesses. There must have a reason why the companies prefer that type of way to do business and that's what I could come up with. There are probably much more other reasons to be added. 

 

 

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2 minutes ago, oilinki said:

I was talking in general when it comes to just in time businesses. There must have a reason why the companies prefer that type of way to do business and that's what I could come up with. There are probably much more other reasons to be added. 

 

 

Yes, And it's bizarre that most Brexiters don't seem to get that. 

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1 hour ago, bomber said:

there are no pensions as good in the private sector unless you are very lucky and there is nothing to stop a NHS worker taking a gamble on one if they so wished,but i bet less than 1% do,the NHS is still 99.9% a job for life,the private sector is anything but.

You obviously know very little about pension schemes. You can't join a company pension scheme if you don't work for the company. 555

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9 minutes ago, bristolboy said:

Yes, And it's bizarre that most Brexiters don't seem to get that. 

For the loudest and angriest Brexitters, who are about 5-7 % of the voters, Brexit gives a religious type of trance type of feeling. They don't want to understand nor listen, quite like the folks who believe Earth is 6000 years old. 

 

The rest will adapt, slowly, to the new way of thinking when talked to logically.

 

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2 hours ago, bomber said:

just the sheep 😁

Aha aha aha ha ha .. How very original .. Think of that one yourself did you .. 

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2 hours ago, Spidey said:

Because you have given zero evidence for your figure. Most economists say the opposite.

 

I await @evadgib's Twitter feed to kick in.

You'll have already seen it by the time I get there 😁

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2 hours ago, bristolboy said:

You're quite right in general. Rolls Royce is a special case since for marketing reasons the cachet of its tradition is important in selling the product. That said, the heart of the machine, the engine and some other parts are actually manufactured by BMW in Germany.

RR is more than those silly cars

they make turbine engines

propulsion systems for the marine sector

DP system for the marine sector (damned good stuff that)

 

this kind of piss talk from RR;

in Norway we call it " speaking for your sick mother"

 

RR is an infinitesimal small part of UKs future, they should just keep mum

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5 minutes ago, melvinmelvin said:

RR is more than those silly cars

they make turbine engines

propulsion systems for the marine sector

DP system for the marine sector (damned good stuff that)

 

this kind of piss talk from RR;

in Norway we call it " speaking for your sick mother"

 

RR is an infinitesimal small part of UKs future, they should just keep mum

I believe that's the other Rolls Royce that no longer has anything to do with the auto manufacturer.

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