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BANGKOK 24 February 2019 00:15
darren1971

Stop tearing families apart based on earnings! Scrap minimum income requirement

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21 hours ago, theoldgit said:

I'm not sure that marrying a UK national was ever supposed to be "a way of entry into the UK", I'm also not sure that it was ever an automatic right, certainly not in recent times.

 

Likewise HMG's fallback position has always been that there's nothing to stop a UK national marrying a foreign national and living together in another country, Thailand for instance, that's where my wife and I have chosen to live.

So you left the UK to live in Thailand as a retiree ? Because if that is the case you are still under the control of the UK Gov; as they will freeze your state pension and cancel your rights to the NHS after a period of absence from the UK .  So all those years of N.I.C's and income taxes that you paid in have been reigned in to dilute your rightful benefits .

I do not want to drift off the topic but some might say that it is one rule for the haves and another for the have not's. Explanation --  18600 pounds minimum  income for a born & bred UK citizen of the UK to bring his Asian spouse  ( not children as that mounts up again ) into the UK to live .  Now then , a foreign   Mr Moneybags can make a substantial financial investment into the UK which will qualify him for citizenship .

Or is it a Mr Moneybags or merely a mass of money that is being circulated / passed from one to another applicant to gain UK entry  .

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44 minutes ago, superal said:

So you left the UK to live in Thailand as a retiree ? Because if that is the case you are still under the control of the UK Gov; as they will freeze your state pension and cancel your rights to the NHS after a period of absence from the UK .  So all those years of N.I.C's and income taxes that you paid in have been reigned in to dilute your rightful benefits .

I do not want to drift off the topic but some might say that it is one rule for the haves and another for the have not's. Explanation --  18600 pounds minimum  income for a born & bred UK citizen of the UK to bring his Asian spouse  ( not children as that mounts up again ) into the UK to live .  Now then , a foreign   Mr Moneybags can make a substantial financial investment into the UK which will qualify him for citizenship .

Or is it a Mr Moneybags or merely a mass of money that is being circulated / passed from one to another applicant to gain UK entry  .

You're right you're drifting off the actual topic, but I'll answer anyway as it's probably relevent.
Yes I moved here in the full knowledge that when I reached 65 age my State Pension would be frozen, and whilst I did so out of choice that doesn't mean I think it's right.
The removal of NHS cover came years after I moved here, that's also wrong but something I took on the chin, though it could of course it could be the tipping point if I weigh up the pros and cons of returning in the future, and of course I do buy insurance when we travel to the UK, the same as we do for other parts of the world.
The fact remains that if I couldn't meet the income criteria to return to the UK with my wife, we could still live here as a married couple, so TM, who I despise, hasn't denied my right to marry the lady of my choice, and to be quite honest I believe that your choice of spouse shouldn't be determined by where you can live.

One other point you seem to be making is wrong, you seem to be saying that if my wife and I decided to have children then the income level required should we decide to settle in the UK would be higher, that's incorrect as my children would be British and entitled to entry into the UK, and all that goes with it, as a matter of right, the income requirement only rises if you wish to take non British children with you.
I do feel for those who can't meet the minimum income requirements, but in all honesty the bar hasn't been set that high, 7by7 has already explained how that figure is reached, and to be quite honest I'd rather be living here on a lower salary than struggling to live in the UK and having to rely on benefits.
I'm not one of your Mr Moneybags, I'm just an average guy who chooses to live here on my pension than in the UK.

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19 hours ago, nontabury said:

Why should they have to pay visa fees? Especially if one of the family is British.

Why should the taxpayer cover the cost?

 

I, along with most people I know who have expressed an opinion, have no objection to paying a fee for a visa or LTR application; as long as that fee is designed to recover costs. We neither want nor expect something for nothing.

 

What we object to is the fees regime begun under Labour which makes a vast profit for the government from most of these fees.

 

19 hours ago, nontabury said:

Just this week the government has Relented,on the requirements that E.U citizens, ( neither of whom are British citizens) must pay £65 to remain in the country after Brexit

Whether any of the remaining 27, plus the EEA states and Switzerland, have said the same, I don't know. But I expect they will reciprocate, if they have not already done so.

 

Unless the government agrees to be bound to the four freedoms, then post Brexit EEA nationals moving to the UK will have to apply and pay for the relevant visa just as non EEA nationals do now; and, of course, British nationals who wish to move to a EEA member state will have to apply for the relevant visa and pay whatever fees that state imposes on non EEA nationals.

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1 hour ago, 7by7 said:

Why should the taxpayer cover the cost?

 

I, along with most people I know who have expressed an opinion, have no objection to paying a fee for a visa or LTR application; as long as that fee is designed to recover costs. We neither want nor expect something for nothing.

 

 

 

 

 So your quite happy for citizens of the E.u to receive something for nothing. Which of course would be paid for by the British taxpayers.

  

   While in the meantime British citizens will be required to pay a substantial amount to bring there families into the U.K. from countries such as Thailand.

 

   One of the added cost, incurred by the foreign wives of British citizens, is that they must pay for insurance, to cover any treatment from the NHS. Do immigrants from E.u countries also have to pay this cost?

 Also are you aware that those wives of British citizens, who have paid for this insurance cover, are then hit with an extra payment for N.I should they take up employment. In other words they are paying twice.

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Back to original post I've noticed the petition passed the 100,000 mark. 

I'm from Edinburgh as well so there has been a bit about in the local press. It transpires he takes less than 18,600 out the business as a wage hence the refusal. Therefore, think he may have a long road ahead. 

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14 hours ago, nontabury said:

 So your quite happy for citizens of the E.u to receive something for nothing. Which of course would be paid for by the British taxpayers.

  

   While in the meantime British citizens will be required to pay a substantial amount to bring there families into the U.K. from countries such as Thailand.

 

The UK is still a member of the EU and so EEA and Swiss nationals can take advantage of the freedom of movement directive to live, work or study in the UK. What you are forgetting, or choosing to ignore, though is that British citizens do exactly the same in order to live, work or study in the other EEA countries and Switzerland.

 

Indeed, British citizens who have been exercising a treaty right in another EEA state whose non EEA or Swiss national, e.g. Thai, can use the directive to return to the UK with their family and pay nothing.

 

Of course, once Brexit happens it is highly unlikely that this will still be possible; which doubtless will please you greatly.

 

15 hours ago, nontabury said:

One of the added cost, incurred by the foreign wives of British citizens, is that they must pay for insurance, to cover any treatment from the NHS. Do immigrants from E.u countries also have to pay this cost?

 I am fully aware of the IHS surcharge and have been highly critical of it since it's introduction was first announced You have come very late to this particular party!

 

EEA and Swiss nationals living in the UK are not subject to the surcharge, for the same reason that British nationals living in other EEA countries or Switzerland are not subject to state health charges there.

 

If the UK had a treaty with, for example, Thailand similar to that which we, at least until Brexit, have with the EU which covered freedom of movement and reciprocal healthcare, then Thai nationals would not have to pay UK visa fees nor the IHS surcharge. But we don't.

 

15 hours ago, nontabury said:

Also are you aware that those wives of British citizens, who have paid for this insurance cover, are then hit with an extra payment for N.I should they take up employment. In other words they are paying twice.

Which is part of the argument I have used against the IHS surcharge for family migration since it was first announced. Another argument is that even if the foreign partner is not going to be working, the British partner is and paying income tax; even if not working then the level of savings or unearned income required to meet the financial requirement means they are still probably paying income tax.

 

Of course, both partners also pay VAT on almost everything they buy; not to mention other taxes, such as fuel duty if they have a car.

 

But, like abolishing the financial requirement, you will find that abolishing the IHS has little support among the general British population.

 

BTW; Almost all the money raised from NICs goes into paying contribution related benefits, such as the state pension. Only a tiny proportion goes to the NHS, which is mainly funded from general taxation.

 

 

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9 hours ago, magicroundabout said:

Back to original post I've noticed the petition passed the 100,000 mark.

The Change.org one has; did so some time ago. Unfortunately the government will pay zero attention to it.

 

The Parliamentary one which may actually have an effect is still languishing at just above 100!

 

Of course, these Parliamentary petitions very rarely change anything; but at least if it gets up to 10,000 signatures the government will have to respond and if it gets to 100,000 the matter will have to be debated in the House.

 

Sign it now, get your friends and relatives to sign it. If you know anyone who has signed the Change.org petition, get them to sign this one too! 

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[mention=237005]4MyEgo[/mention],
Valid point; but as I said in my first post in this topic, under the pre 2012 system
Now obviously the cost of living, especially housing costs, varies widely across the UK; as I`m sure it does in Australia. But even taking that into account, the UK government insists a couple where one partner is an immigrant needs an income considerably higher than that they say a wholly British couple can live on!

So same as Thailand then where you must lodge 400000 THB in a Thai bank or show a monthly income far in excess of what a lot of Thai families would have as a monthly income


Sent from my iPad using Thailand Forum - Thaivisa mobile app

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Post in breach of Forum Rules removed, whilst I sympathise with your reasons to gather support I can't ignore the breach of rules - sorry.

 

5) You will not use Thaivisa as a platform to gather support to effect changes on religious, political, or governmental issues.

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