Jump to content
BANGKOK 26 March 2019 03:42
webfact

Air pollution alert for Friday

Recommended Posts

50micrograms is safe. Wow, from what i h derstand no measure is safe but due to people wanting to have some reference point 15 and 30 have been mentioned in other countries as ok. Lucky Thais get 50....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, alfalfa19 said:

Hard to believe that it could get any worse.  Nevertheless, Thailand is a nation of overachievers. 

No it's not hard to believe at all,..... it was up in the air, that these day will come sooner than later..... 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, webfact said:

Still air, higher particulates predicted for today

By The Nation

 

402da85a6be7894051d42064f4152922.jpeg

A trains runs through along a track as bad air pollution continues to affect Bangkok yesterday. // EPA-EFE PHOTO

 

POLLUTION is expected to get worse in Bangkok today following slight improvements in weather conditions yesterday.

 

Fewer locations reported fine particle dust beyond safe levels yesterday, while the Meteorological Department issued a warning about a high-pressure area hovering over Laos and the Northeast that will bring temperatures down by 1 to 3 degrees Celsius in greater Bangkok today. 

 

According to the department’s director-general Phuwiang Prakhammin, there will be a slight dip in temperatures from yesterday to Saturday thanks to the high-pressure area. However, once the cooler air mass withdraws, still air will hover over greater Bangkok and it will combine with fog. The level of fine particle dust may peak on Sunday.

 

Though the air may be less toxic because rain on Tuesday and Wednesday washed away some of the dust. 

 

The Pollution Control Department (PCD), meanwhile, reported that 16 roadside areas and nine general areas (away from main roads) in greater Bangkok still had unsafe levels of particulate matter smaller than 2.5 microns (PM2.5) in the air. The safe limit is 50 micrograms of PM2.5 per cubic metre of air. 

 

In Bangkok, roadside areas on Phaholyothin Road in Chatuchak district, a spot in front of Kasetsart University in Bang Khen district and the area near the Thanon Tok intersection in Bang Kho Laem district each reported an unsafe level of 62 micrograms.

 

The PCD also reported that the quality of air today will be “moderate” and cited the weather bureau as saying there will be no rain in the capital and its five surrounding provinces. 

 

In the wake of pollution, various agencies have this week implemented dust-reducing measures such as suspending the construction of the Mass Rapid Transit Authority of Thailand’s Orange, Yellow and Pink electric rail lines until January 22. 

 

Meanwhile, the Bangkok Mass Transit Authority has been checking vehicles and keeping exhaust-spewing buses off the streets, while traffic police have nearly doubled checkpoints to 20 from the previous 12 to catch and seize polluting four-wheelers. 

 

The Bangkok Metropolitan Administration has sent workers to clean and hose down risky spots on a daily basis. 

 

Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/national/30362474

 
thenation_logo.jpg
-- © Copyright The Nation 2019-01-18

Yesterday the Thai authorities said there was nothing to worry about. Doesn't look that way to me. The next step will be to ban vehicles in Bangkok! What a nightmare that would be 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, webfact said:

Fewer locations reported fine particle dust higher than safe levels on Thursday,

There's a clue in the post.... just stop reporting high levels, problem solved !!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe they could divert some of that submarine money to buying new busses, you know like the ones they ordered before and then refused delivery of. Or maybe add some additional trains to the BTS / MRT to relieve the massive overcrowding caused by extension of the lines.

oops forgot it’s a military government so submarines much more important.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, KhunProletariat said:

Whats rubbish? The fact that old buses spew out most of the exhaust fumes and they should be banned?

 

Seems logical to me.

 

KP.

Exactly logical. They should also look at converting the coal-fired power stations to LNG. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the main problem is the number of cars bikes and other forms of transport on the roads in Bangkok

they need to start introducing no go areas and fine people using polluting dirty exhausts ect  like other Capital cities 

but here its a pipe dream will never happen 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

come on. think on the bright side. at least, the mosquitoes are kept at bay.

Edited by Bkkthebest

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No doubt there are civic organizations in Thailand active in environmental matters, and numerous activists -- many of them highly educated people -- have been sounding the alarm for years now with regard to pollution and other concerns, but it appears their influence is limited.  Are they up against some kind of ingrained fatalism in the culture, or is it that possibly any kind of civic involvement -- or a call to same -- is simply ignored?  If so, it may be ignored because it is seen as an "elitist" kind of thing, since most Thais, like people everywhere, are more concerned about their next meal, and do not see environmental issues as more than an abstraction, or something merely indulged in by airheads.  (No pun intended.) 

 

However, one should not dismiss also the deadening oppression of a government that is itself unresponsive in any meaningful way to the pleas of those individuals and groups calling for change -- the urgent need for which has become increasingly evident.  Autocratic governments around the world have been on a campaign to intimidate and harass dissidents, whistleblowers and investigative reporters.  In countries and cultures living under such a government, there is also what could be called self-censorship, whereby individuals have internalized what the culture does not want them to think or say; they know they will be left alone as long as they do not raise their voice.  

 

So I would suggest that the problem is cultural and to a certain degree political.  A state apparatus resistant to change (fearful of it, really) and ready to quash those who threaten its grip, will do what it must -- by means of propaganda, infiltration of dissident movements, and all the other usual dirty tricks -- to save itself.  Those in power will ensure that no one shall be the wiser, or even care when someone just disappears, dies suddenly foaming at the mouth on a park bench, or surfaces after a long absence in a video confessing to sedition or some other infamy.  And those unnamed powers will make sure that everything will soon be forgotten -- advising the media to relegate it to yesterday's news and kill the story as soon as possible.  Money is at the heart of it -- and fear.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, webfact said:

Still air, higher particulates predicted for today

By The Nation

 

402da85a6be7894051d42064f4152922.jpeg

A trains runs through along a track as bad air pollution continues to affect Bangkok yesterday. // EPA-EFE PHOTO

 

POLLUTION is expected to get worse in Bangkok today following slight improvements in weather conditions yesterday.

 

Fewer locations reported fine particle dust beyond safe levels yesterday, while the Meteorological Department issued a warning about a high-pressure area hovering over Laos and the Northeast that will bring temperatures down by 1 to 3 degrees Celsius in greater Bangkok today. 

 

According to the department’s director-general Phuwiang Prakhammin, there will be a slight dip in temperatures from yesterday to Saturday thanks to the high-pressure area. However, once the cooler air mass withdraws, still air will hover over greater Bangkok and it will combine with fog. The level of fine particle dust may peak on Sunday.

 

Though the air may be less toxic because rain on Tuesday and Wednesday washed away some of the dust. 

 

The Pollution Control Department (PCD), meanwhile, reported that 16 roadside areas and nine general areas (away from main roads) in greater Bangkok still had unsafe levels of particulate matter smaller than 2.5 microns (PM2.5) in the air. The safe limit is 50 micrograms of PM2.5 per cubic metre of air. 

 

In Bangkok, roadside areas on Phaholyothin Road in Chatuchak district, a spot in front of Kasetsart University in Bang Khen district and the area near the Thanon Tok intersection in Bang Kho Laem district each reported an unsafe level of 62 micrograms.

 

The PCD also reported that the quality of air today will be “moderate” and cited the weather bureau as saying there will be no rain in the capital and its five surrounding provinces. 

 

In the wake of pollution, various agencies have this week implemented dust-reducing measures such as suspending the construction of the Mass Rapid Transit Authority of Thailand’s Orange, Yellow and Pink electric rail lines until January 22. 

 

Meanwhile, the Bangkok Mass Transit Authority has been checking vehicles and keeping exhaust-spewing buses off the streets, while traffic police have nearly doubled checkpoints to 20 from the previous 12 to catch and seize polluting four-wheelers. 

 

The Bangkok Metropolitan Administration has sent workers to clean and hose down risky spots on a daily basis. 

 

Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/national/30362474

 
thenation_logo.jpg
-- © Copyright The Nation 2019-01-18

You cant fix this problem ever.Im on my last yearly month long visit and never coming back.Too many tourists and too much pollution.The place has long lost its soul and charm.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, KhunProletariat said:

Whats rubbish? The fact that old buses spew out most of the exhaust fumes and they should be banned?

 

Seems logical to me.

 

KP.

The rubbish is, is that the buses will most likely remain on the roads.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Air quality in Bangkok is horrible but it’s always been horrible. Why the sudden panic? Bangkok air has always made my nose bleed for as long as I can remember. Booked out of Bangkok moons ago and set up shop in Phuket. And Bangkok air is certainly not even close to as bad as China, Hanoi Vietnam, India, and even Paradise, California USA.

 

Check out an app called Air Visual that will tell you the AQI in a given area. Bangkok is at 60 which is not bad at all. It’s up in the 140 to 180 range in China and Hanoi.

52BC1E8A-7E92-49D8-8714-5FEFF8527ED9.png

524883C0-6589-492C-9A61-239291E37D9C.png

511FACDC-8B53-4B4B-AC6B-EFAB161199E2.png

7B52CC6C-535A-46A2-B13C-6B5CC922DF3C.png

68D7DCE1-5A25-4D2C-9FE7-A8EB07553F6D.png

Edited by KnowItAllSMD

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, soistalker said:

If I am not mistaken, the BTS and MRT run on clean energy. The problem is that they are expensive means of transportation for most natives. And the trains are not run frequently and are often crowded. 

Take the money they are spending to spray water 20 meters into the air (absolutely kindergarten science) forceably retire most buses which cannot be fixed, and subsidie BTS/MRT travel. Get additional revenue from any vehicle not following traffic laws through hefty fines, and confiscate and sell any motorcycles riding or parked on the sidewalk. 

What is the clean energy they run on?

 

Buses go places BTS and MRT don't.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...