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BANGKOK 23 July 2019 05:21
snoop1130

Driving slowly in high-speed lane to soon become a punishable offence

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'' driving at low speed in right-hand lanes will soon be subjected to fines ''  ...... a bit like fines for driving without a licence, insurance, road tax, or riding without a helmet and four riding pillion or riding against the traffic flow etc etc etc etc ... TIT !

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23 minutes ago, dcnx said:

I’ve been in several, all in Thailand. All the fault of a local doing something stupid. 

 

Donkeys shouldnt drive. Period.

That tells a lot of your driving skills 🤣.

Like you say, you better not drive. 

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I agree wholeheartedly with Richard_Smith237

The driving lane is the left hand lane on any road, all other lanes are overtaking lanes. In this country there is no concept of this essential rule. If I see (as I often do) a driver driving down on the middle or right hand lane while the left hand lane is completely empty, I get frustrated and angry. 

There is no education on this and many more essential rules by the government. Despite the repeated deaths in their thousands every year they do not run a advertising campaign on tv to address the cause. How to drive on a highway, box junctions ( Thai's do not know what they are for). I would love to see more roundabouts as there are in Europe to avoid all those dangerous U turns which are a major cause of accidents. Motorcyclists need to be taught not to overtake on the inside in the driving lane ( another major cause of fatal accidents).

Large trucks should all have lane watch cameras and proximity sensors to detect motorcycles or other obscured vehicles near the truck where they cannot easily be seen. Thailand comes down heavy on drugs, however the situation on the roads causes many more deaths than all the drugs put together, yet nothing is done. 

There is an illegal U turn sign on the junction just near the Mall Thapra. There is a continual line of cars and motorcycles at that junction all day making that illegal turn. Now, there is no other nearby provision for making a safe U turn which makes a case for those vehicles illegally turning valid in my opinion. However: Why the sign then? Why not make it safer? 

Is the reason for not having roundabouts as in the UK ( which work very well) that Thai's could not give way to the traffic already on the roundabout? I never see the politeness in Thailand that I see in the UK and other EU countries. In fact drivers do not know what to make of it and hesitate when I give way to a vehicle that wants to merge or exit from a road or building. I don't know if others have the same experience?

If the rules of the road are observed and enforced as stated there would be no need for this arbitary law.

Edited by Sumarianson

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What I cannot understand - I mean this literally, not saying that this is incomprehensible - is that Thais drive cars so damn slowly. Slow enough to clog up their engines with carbon, slow enough to put the other drivers behind them at risk for collisions and so slow that they get to their destinations later than they would if they were driving like normal people. Like the Grab taxi driver yesterday going up to Doi Suthep, stradling the white line much of the time, changing lanes constantly in the curves, passing pairs of people on their little motor bikes, half-way into their lane, causing faster drivers to pass her 1/2 way over the yellow line into the lane of the oncoming traffic, with no concern that they could cause a head-on collision, passing bikes going into blind curves with no regard for the fact that there could be a slower vehicle ahead in her lane that she would rear-end. 

They use the brakes and accelerator with the skill-level of a 10-year-old kid in America, easing the steering wheel around like they think it would break, so they constantly go over the lines and out of their lanes, instead of steering so as to stay in the middle of their own lane.

 

I know these people will not listen and cannot be told when they make a serious, dangerous mistake and cause a near-accident so I don't even bother to admonish them.

 

Yet I know that these are the same people who ride m.c.'s with skill, take dangerous chances, riding far faster than the bike was designed to go - and still get nowhere any sooner than they would have if they were riding at sane speeds.

 

So my question is how do you reconcile this contrast: between riding m.c.'s too fast and driving cars dangerously slow?

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OK , AND THE SPEED LIMIT IS 120 KM/H ON THE RIGHT LINE OR......!?? 

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9 hours ago, cornishcarlos said:

 

I don't think your experience and common sense will prevent Somchai on yaba, running a red light in his 10 wheeler and, cleaning you up in the process...

You can do the best you can but at the end of the day, your fate might be in the hands of some untrained, uncaring local !!

True,we can only do the best we can and hope for the best. 

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Driving slowly in high-speed lane to soon become a punishable offence

 

The headline's a bit misleading!  They're all high-speed lanes!  But then the right-hand-lane was mentioned.

 

So, are they going to punish the HGV drivers who only drive in that lane!  Then there's the coaches, and the motorycles with sidecars that are going to do a u-turn at the junction 3 kms ahead.

 

I suppose that it's a lot easier to catch the slow ones, while the speeding/drunk scumbags are helping to keep that number 1 slot for road deaths.

 

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And who, pray tell enforces any of the existing traffic laws on Thai roadways? Mobile police units? Don't seem to exist. Traffic stops by mobile police units? Don't seem to exist. Significance of police units with flashing red lights? Don't seem to signify anything except "Hi, I'm here. look at me". Laughable.

 

The basic unit for law enforcement seems broken. From a past career in that field, it seems broken from higher places than just the copper at the bottom of the food chain.

 

 

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As I understand it, there is already a law which states that traffic must not remain in the outside lane 'longer than necessary' (i.e. when not overtaking). As we know, this law is never enforced, so what are the chances for this new one?

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7 hours ago, Lemonltr said:

As you are "not sure" about Thai Road rules I assume you don't drive as you would be just as guilty as a Thai who didn't. 

Abridged. :- Sect. 34. If the road has 2 or more lanes in the same direction the driver shall keep to the left. EXCEPT. the road is prescribed as 1 way.

Section 44. No driver shall overtake on the left side UNLESS. the road has two or more lanes in the same direction. ie. On 1 way roads overtaking on both sides is legal!! 

A not perfect English translation is available to download on Thai Laws. com. 

I think you have misunderstood Section 44; if you can't overtake on the left unless the road has two or more lanes, then it is forbidden on 1 way roads but permissible on others. The fact that you are allowed to overtake on the left seems to cause a problems for western drivers, but once you understand that you have to check both ways it becomes second nature.

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On 1/18/2019 at 11:09 AM, Mark Hummel said:

It is amazing to me that the government does nothing about mandatory LIGHTS ON FOR SAFETY while driving. Too worried about helmet checks. Why is it Thai people insist on driving with car running lights off during the day. No lights on during rain, and lucky if they turn them on at night. Every night I drive I see at least 20 motorbikes without lights at all driving from Nathon to Lamai. In the U.S. (no I am not very proud of the U.S. at the moment) every car when started running lights must come on automatically.  It is no wonder to me why so many people are killed on the road.

 

so true !!!

 

 

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22 hours ago, Stupooey said:

As I understand it, there is already a law which states that traffic must not remain in the outside lane 'longer than necessary' (i.e. when not overtaking). As we know, this law is never enforced, so what are the chances for this new one?

no chance whatsoever 

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👌 Waiting for the new raised speed limits - what could go wrong 🕺

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