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BANGKOK 19 February 2019 13:49
cheeryble

Power tool brand for decent quality great price

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I can't remember if it was Wickes or Homebase in England where 15-20 years ago I bought a fairly hefty cordless drill which never broke down, and had quality batteries which lasted. They had a range of tools. I can't remember the brand but they were definitely NOT the price of normal quality tools. ( i had a lovely Wickes double handed SDS hammer drill which never failed and was also reasonably priced while not super cheap.

 

I'm not using tools daily any more, so i don't need the best but I am considering getting a bit better kitted up with both power and hand tools and i would like them to last.

 

I'm guessing there must be at least one brand of power tools probably from China that has built up a reputation for decent quality at a really good price.

 

The question is does anyone have any recommendations?

 

Thanks 

 

Edited by cheeryble

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28 minutes ago, cheeryble said:

The question is does anyone have any recommendations?

Dewalt.

 

 

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Hitachi.

Not the cheapest, nor the most expensive, but if you want reliable, hard wearing good quality power tools then look no further.

 

Bought my first Hitachi cordless combi drill 35 years ago, then soon replaced the unreliable De Walt and Bosch collection of SDS cordless drill, circular saw, jigsaw, router and sliding compound mitre saw with Hitachi.

I replaced the cordless combi drill 5 years ago when the batteries finally gave up the ghost, but everything else is still in full working order to this day.

 

I used these 6 days a week for 30 years on site, renovated three homes and never had an issue or breakdown.

Last year I brought the 18V 4amp battery combi drill from the UK to Thailand.

 

Panasonic also have a good reputation. De Walt and Bosch are overpriced and over rated.

Steer clear of Ryobi, absolute crap.

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7 hours ago, NCC1701A said:

 

Dewalt.

You do know your essentially buying a Black and Decker?

DeWalt is a trade name of B&D.

 

It's like owning a matchbox toy, when you could have had a Tonka.

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Quote

I replaced the cordless combi drill 5 years ago when the batteries finally gave up the ghost, but everything else is still in full working order to this day.

 

If in BKK and they are NiCads it is fairly easy to get new cells fitted. Just take the battery pack to Amorn and they will do it for you.

 

Done that a few times on a couple of well used Dewalts. Until the chuck packed up on one and ....

 

When replacing it is worth looking at the accessibility of the brush holders. Some have screw covers while others need to have the tool disassembled to access them.

Edited by VocalNeal

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Yep. Keep your eyes and ears open. I bought a Hilti Rotary on a special offer once. 1800 baht.

 

The popular with tradesmen logic also works for pressure washers. Check out which one they use everyday when the AC guys come to clean the aircon units.

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Plenty to chose from in Global house I have the cheapest battery drill they sell works a treat. 

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I think on a diy basis, pretty much any brand will suffice.

If i was on site, earning my living I would not go beyond Bosch and Makita.

 

I have hitachis, maktecs, Stanleys that I bought just to do simple jobs but have lasted 5yrs getting daily use.

I really dont think it matters unless you are the equivalent of a petrol head.

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Thanks for the great advice confirms my thoughts that going economical can be ok (also not ok like the Ryobi). I actually have a B and D corded hammer drill or I’d buy the Bosta. But would like a cordless drill with decent battery (pref 2) for small drilling and screwdriving. The only other thing I have is a cheap but ok angle grinder so I guess a circular saw is on the cards may be cutting up a few sheets of MDF soon.

 

Bonus question:

Has anyone stained MDF with dark oak finish......wondering if it would look well or would we know it was MDF underneath?

 

 

Sent from my iPad using Thaivisa Connect

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, cheeryble said:

Bonus question:

Has anyone stained MDF with dark oak finish......wondering if it would look well or would we know it was MDF underneath?

what do you mean by stain? in Thailand stain is often brown paint.

 

If translucent it will be dark brown MDF. 

 

If using most Thai Stain it will be really smooth dark brown, but of course will not have any grain. 

Edited by sometimewoodworker
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1 hour ago, cheeryble said:

Thanks for the great advice confirms my thoughts that going economical can be ok (also not ok like the Ryobi). I actually have a B and D corded hammer drill or I’d buy the Bosta. But would like a cordless drill with decent battery (pref 2) for small drilling and screwdriving. The only other thing I have is a cheap but ok angle grinder so I guess a circular saw is on the cards may be cutting up a few sheets of MDF soon.

Try Thai Watsadu as opposed to Global or Home Pro for price comparison.

Most battery drills come with 2 x batteries, make sure it's 220/240V, combi type preferable for multi use and the bigger the amp of the battery the longer and more powerful it will be.

I couldn't find 18v 4amp in Thailand which is why I brought one over from the UK.

 

1 hour ago, cheeryble said:

Has anyone stained MDF with dark oak finish......wondering if it would look well or would we know it was MDF underneath?

Difficult to stain mdf uniformly. Overlapping with brush or cloth application gives varying shades.

Depending on your use, mdf doesn't last in Thailand due to high humidity, unless it's covered with Formica, or varnish to seal it. Plywood wood be harder wearing.

Whichever, you need to seal or cover it to stop the termites gaining access.

 

I recently bought some hardwood sheets, 60cm x 3m x 12mm for kitchen worktops.

Stain to suit, but I preferred the 'pine' effect, so just gave them 4 coats of 'yacht' varnish, sanding each coat with wet and dry paper. Labour intensive, but the result was worth it.

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5 minutes ago, sometimewoodworker said:

what do you mean by stain? in Thailand stain is often brown paint.

 

If translucent it will be dark brown MDF. 

 

If using most Thai Stain it will be really smooth dark brown, but of course will not have any grain. 

MDF is usually sandy in colour.

It's a combination of hardwood and softwood fibres compressed to make a medium density board, usually denser than plywood, but very susceptible to damp or humid conditions unless treated.

Many different stains and shades available.

Teak, light oak, dark oak stains available, plus stained varnishes, similar to paint.

 

Personally, I prefer to stain separately, then clear 'yacht' varnish to seal.

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Hi STWW and Tanoshi

The finish I want is not the "brown matt paint" type which is often used for wooden houses.
Rather I want something with more of a soft lacquer look.
It’s for open wardrobe shelving and maybe drawers, and should match these doors furniture and posts
IMG_4118.JPG

IMG_6487.JPG

IMG_4145.JPG

20150831-002A7104.dngIMG_6513.JPG

I hadn’t thought of the damp effect

The shelves etc will fit in between various sized sections like this which go round two walls of the dressing room

IMG_6503.JPG

I think a test may be called for with an off cut.
Just gotta find an offcut


Sent from my iPad using Thailand Forum - Thaivisa mobile app

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i would avoid MDF if possible. Was my standard do it all board back in the UK, could get Fire resistant, water resistant, standard, lightweight, ec. Here its just standard and i found even with coating all sides with wood care type varnish, it still soaked up the moisture in the wet season and became covered in black spores. Ripped it all out and replaced with decent plywood

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