Jump to content
BANGKOK 22 February 2019 10:44
webfact

Satun: Student's "banana leaf" sandwich packaging wows netizens

Recommended Posts

That's great news and enterprising too.

 

I wonder what the 'natural tie' exactly is?

In the right-hand photo, what's the very dark green wrapping in the centre - is that a type of banana leaf too?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, bluesofa said:

That's great news and enterprising too.

 

I wonder what the 'natural tie' exactly is?

In the right-hand photo, what's the very dark green wrapping in the centre - is that a type of banana leaf too?

It looks like a strip off a banana leaf. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

im a natural banana grower of 2000+ plants and we use no chemicals. I wouldnt dare even touch another farms banana leaves. Even our goats only eat our banana leaves. Weird... Good for the enviro though. Im all for alternatives.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually the tie may be a strip of bamboo, softened as mentioned above. Haven't seen that for sale in the market but haven't really been looking.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Reusable Tupperware container keeps food fresh and protected. That's what I use.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kudos to the kid for hustling. If she is selling the sarnies for 10B each and grossing 1000B a week, she is probably putting between 3-500 in her pocket.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Enterprising student, shows that using the older traditions pays dividends.

The local plastic suppliers will dislike this, but keep it up. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One of my favorite local sellers recently switched from leaves to Styrofoam.

It upsets me, and I mentioned it to him. Leaves decompose and put nutrients back into the soil. Styrofoam is trash that lasts forever. You pollute three times - environmental destruction pulling it out of the ground, air and water pollution in the manufacturing process, and then waste left when you're done. Not to mention shipping costs. But it's so hard to resist the pressure to "go modern".

What do people think the end game is? Our world is already drowning in plastic and it's only been around a few decades and mostly in the West at that...where's it going to disappear to in the next 50-100 years when 10x as much plastic is getting used?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/22/2019 at 12:32 AM, Kerryd said:


The light coloured "tie" is a natural fibre, part of the leaf I believe. The dark strip around the sandwich in the right picture is also a part of the leaf.

 

The lady across the street from me often makes a "khao lom mat" dessert (sticky rice with banana inside, wrapped in banana leaf and steamed).

She buys the banana leaves and washes them, then leaves them out to dry. Cooks the rice, cuts the leaves into strips, puts some rice on a strip, a piece of banana, some more rice on top then wraps the rest of the banana strip around it and ties it off with that lighter coloured fibre before tossing them into a steamer.


I think that fibre is a part of the central stem of the banana leaf, sliced into thin strips. Maybe soaked (boiled) for awhile to make it more pliable before being used.

Next time I see her making some I'll ask her about it.

 

Some places will make similar dishes but will fold the banana leaf strips "upwards", fold them over at the top and secure it with a bamboo skewer.

 

I was buying sticky rice wrapped in banana leaf with the bamboo skewer in the mornings in Aonang, Krabi,  last summer.

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...