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BANGKOK 21 February 2019 13:01
snoop1130

Army plans to have soldiers ordained, posted to temples in troubled South: Army chief

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Army plans to have soldiers ordained, posted  to temples in troubled South: Army chief

By Narong Nuansakul 
The Nation

 

1c213366f078b8234156e61c0552fd7a.jpeg

File photo : Army chief General Apirat Kongsompong

 

The Army plans to have some of its soldiers ordained into the monkhood and assigned to posts in temples, Commander in Chief General Apirat Kongsompong said on Tuesday.

 

Having soldiers as monks in temples will create confidence and ease concerns among the public and other monks over their safety. Apirat said soldiers will join the plan voluntarily.

 

Apirat was speaking after visiting Rattananuparb Temple in Narathiwat’s Sungai Padi district, which was attacked by armed militants last week. 

 

The temple’s abbot and his deputy were killed instantly after being shot at close range, while many other monks were injured in the attack.

 

This was the first time that a temple and its monks had become the targets of such an ambush.

 

Apirat on Tuesday attended both monks’ funerals in the presence of senior provincial officials, including Narathiwat Governor Ekkarat Leesen, and Buddhist monks and Muslim leaders.

 

The Army chief also talked to local residents, both Buddhists and Muslims, telling them that the attack had been an isolated case and carried out by individuals who were trying to drag the differences between religions into the ongoing conflict in the deep South, aiming to widen it.

 

Therefore, no one should not fall into the trap laid by the culprits, he stressed, adding that he was pleased to see both Buddhists and Muslims attend the funerals of the monks.

 

Apirat then left for Chulabhorn Army Camp in Narathiwat’s Mueang district to attend a meeting held to review measures and systems aimed at preventing a reoccurrence of Friday’s violent incident.

 

Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/breakingnews/30362720

 

— The Nation 2019-01-22

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"The Army chief also talked to local residents, both Buddhists and Muslims, telling them that the attack had been an isolated case and carried out by individuals who were trying to drag the differences between religions into the ongoing conflict in the deep South, aiming to widen it."

 

The General seems to be saying that religious differences are not part of the conflict, but some people were trying to make them so.

 

That's going to upset a few TVF members, who would rather swallow broken glass than think a millimetre outside their pre-packaged boxes and consider the other factors.

 

 

Edited by Enoon
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This was the same chap who less than a month after getting the top job last year, suggested that there could still be a military coup after the elections if things don't 'go to plan.' More recently, he has issued a warning to those protesting against changing the election date 'not to step over the line.'

 

Now he's vaguely suggesting that arming monks will make things more peaceful?

 

I thought this all a bit much until I learned who his father is.

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High time for some stupid comments.

It is very sad that this idea even has to be considered.

It might help, of it might not help, who knows?

But as long as the world pussyfoots around the menace, it will go on and on these deeds by the deathlovers.

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Having armed monks is sort of the antithesis of Buddhism; however, it's also exactly why Islam will never take over Buddhist nations in SE Asia.  Myanmar's Buddhist resistance to Islam is the quintessential example. This is unlike Christian European countries which are in the process of 'submitting' and will soon look like Spain circa the early 8th Century AD.  Christians can accept Dhimmitude; however, Buddhist are considered pagans and for pagans there is only death by the sword.  So for Buddhist nations with Muslim insurgencies, if you are a Buddhist then it's resist or die.  It's a quandary, but I can understand the Thai military's rationale. 

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 trouble is, that to another ex military type;

 

the concept of having a padre in each village, becomes not so strange!

 

 

but I will wait a bit - until the Padres become non-denominational 

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18 hours ago, snoop1130 said:

The Army plans to have some of its soldiers ordained into the monkhood and assigned to posts in temples, Commander in Chief General Apirat Kongsompong said on Tuesday.

Well, look back at Shaolin monks and one will understand that there are historical examples of Buddhism militancy, the trick being to be willing to fight to preserve the Buddhist tradition but yet being able to do so without hate, actually feeling compassion for those attempting to kill you and destroy your way of life.  It will be interesting to see if the future bring back the concept of 'warrior monks'.  Perhaps the Generals should first send their troops for Shaolin training.  Mahayana Shaolin trained 'special forces monks' protecting their peaceful Theravadan brethren back at home.  Hummm.  🤔  Sounds like the stuff of future dystopian-based fiction.  Or perhaps prescient non-fiction.

 

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So how will potential insurgents know which new monks are soldiers and which are not which temples have armed monks and which do not?

 

Might be more clever than it sounds?

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18 hours ago, snoop1130 said:

the attack had been an isolated case and carried out by individuals who were trying to drag the differences between religions into the ongoing conflict in the deep South, aiming to widen it.

Doesn't embedding armed Thai military soldiers as ordained Buddhist monks at temples further the insurgency as a religious conflict?

Superstitiously planting soldiers at Buddhist temples (the means is irrelevant as the motivation supports a military objectcive) still makes them combatants. That may have the effect to increase insurgent attacks at-large against Buddhist temple personnel once insurgents become aware that the Thai military has in effect militarized Buddhist temples - making Buddhist temples military objectives.

Might that have the effect of a war crime?

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This made me laugh, but I agree with connda.

 

Edited by ramr
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sub-interred around that 'temple' an Armed Thai Pillbox overlooks the Kymer Frontier

 

 

not all what you see are as it seems...

P1000440 - Copy.JPG

P1000448.JPG

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