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BANGKOK 19 May 2019 19:26
Jonathan Fairfield

Thailand to hold first general election since coup on March 24

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Thailand to hold first general election since coup on March 24

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BANGKOK (Reuters) - Thailand will hold a general election to restore civilian rule on March 24, the election commission said on Wednesday, announcing a new date for the often postponed vote, which will be the first since a 2014 military coup.

 

The commission said in December the elections would be held on Feb. 24, but the military government had expressed concern that election-related events would clash with early preparations for the coronation of King Maha Vajiralongkorn, scheduled for May 4-6.

 

Last month, the military government lifted a ban on political activities to allow parties to campaign.

 

(Reporting by Panarat Thepgumpanat; Writing by Patpicha Tanakasempipat; Editing by Robert Birsel)

 

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-- © Copyright Reuters 2019-01-23

 

 

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March 24 set as the national election day : EC

 

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Ittiporn Boonpracong

 

The Election Commission (EC) on Wednesday sets March 24 as the national election day, EC’s chief Ittiporn Boonpracong said.


He was speaking at a press conference after chairing an urgent meeting of EC members.

 

The meeting was held after the long-awaited royal decree ordering a general election of members of Parliament was issued on Wednesday.

Ittiporn also detailed the processes of candidate registration, advance election and overseas balloting.

 

The constitutional process calls for the EC) to announce a date for the election within five days of the decree taking effect on Wednesday with its publication in the Royal Gazette.

 

The law was issued at the command of His Majesty the King and was undersigned by Prime Minister General Prayut Chan-o-cha. The four-clause law puts the president of the EC in charge of ensuring adherence to the royal decree.

 

It requires the EC to formally announce the date of the election in the Royal Gazette within five days of the decree coming into force.  The election date must be no less than 45 days and no more than 60 days from the day the decree takes effect.

 

Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/politics/30362802

 

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-- © Copyright The Nation 2019-01-23

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8 minutes ago, GroveHillWanderer said:

I'm not sure I understand - if an election on February 24 would clash with preparations for the coronation in May then how will an election on March 24 not do the same thing, if not more so?

Yes, of course it does,

 

Which exposes the irrationality of postponing from the February date. Or it might explain the rationality. I very much doubt that Chanocha was willingly dragged to the new date.

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Spoiler Alert: "Juuuuust kidding alert" :cheesy::cheesy:

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Has any one opened the betting book on the new date and what are the current odds? 

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Holding an election doesn't necessarily change anything. Even if the Junta flunkies screw things up and fail to fix the vote…it’s hard to believe the general is going to acknowledge any election results he doesn’t like. Even harder to believe that he plans on walking away from all that power, glory and money. Through trickery or at gunpoint, he still has the means to force himself on the country...and has clearly shown he doesn't mind doing just that.

 

 

Edited by Hayduke
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27 minutes ago, GroveHillWanderer said:

I'm not sure I understand - if an election on February 24 would clash with preparations for the coronation in May then how will an election on March 24 not do the same thing, if not more so?

The final declaration of the results will clash with some of the associated ceremonies as they have to happen 60 days after the election. By moving the date to March they keep within the requirements of the constitution without upsetting the highest authority. This is why the courier with the royal decree made a wrong turn and delayed the decree or royal assent. 

 

Funnily the EC made a declaration so quickly. Even more strange they got the memo and gave the revised date the "government" wanted.

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