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Marriage/Retirement - Interpretations explained.


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18 minutes ago, overherebc said:

I like to live my life with a sense of humour to the fore in all things but recently I'm finding it more difficult to do. 

For a long time I did in the past have short periods where living here got to me, usually a month or so then I'd snap out of it and go with the flow.

I'm starting to feel those periods of 'annoyance' are becoming more frequent.

Change the vest more often and wash the commode out daily. Dashed good for morale.

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After a lengthy meeting with senior Immigration officials from Regional 4 district, regarding clarifications of the amendments to Order 138/2557 and the new Order 35/2562, I can confirm the following;

Thank you. That clears it up for the – unnamed – immigration office to whose officials you talked. Let's hope that the officials at other immigration offices have an equally good understanding and int

yeah maybe TV could remove the other 25 topics on the same subject

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4 hours ago, elviajero said:

Because the applicant is a foreigner wanting to live (not work) in Thailand, and is expected to have an income or cash from there home country as any typical retiree would.

I think it's getting more than "typical" Average UK pension (total) income is Approx £20400 / 816000THB gross @40/£, assuming you have the personal tax allowance that leaves about 751000THB p.a. after tax. (unless your from the City of London or somewhere close) then you may still have some residual commitments in UK

So probably 700kTHB to send to Thailand, would be average...

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On 2/11/2019 at 7:52 PM, Tanoshi said:

If you had 300K deposited in a Thai bank, then you'd need to prove a minimum income of 42k per month throughout the year.

You couldn't withdraw any of the 300K.

But he could spend the 42k monthly, correct?

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Also, and at the risk of "throwing a wet blanket" over all this, I don't think we're anywhere close to seeing the end to all this. If you look at it from the Thai's POV, what they understandably want is some assurance that Type O and Type O-A visa holders who are living in Thailand longer term are able to financially care for themselves and will not become a burden on the state.

 

The changes to the Funds in the Bank will better do that for them.

 

The changes to the Income Method, as stated above, will not.

 

The only income that can be counted upon to be secure and consistent is a pension issued by a government agency. I'm sure the Thais know that, and the source of the "income" in the Income Method will soon be restricted to only pension, even for 30-year-old, unretired, ex-pats living here on and applying for extensions using Marriage qualifications.

 

And, I don't think the Thais will want to wade through and verify all the various documents that an ex-pat could produce to "prove" the deposits were from a government pension.

 

Also, there are many ways to show monthly, international deposits that only appear to guarantee income. You could, for example, transfer THB70K on the 1st of the month, send it back to your home country's account on the 15th, and then resend it back on the 1st of the next month. That would only cost you THB 3K or 4K at the most. I'm sure there are many other, less-obvious schemes to simulate what the Thais are looking for - proof of a secure, consistent, monthly income.

I think when all the dust settles, the only two options available will be Funds in the Bank, or the Letter from your Embassy verifying the monthly, pension income amount.

 

So, I'd advise all of you who, like me, a US citizen, whose embassy will no longer issue the affidavit verifying the source and the amount of Monthly Income, had better get ready to have the Funds in the Bank, perhaps starting in 2020.

 

That's what I am doing.

Edited by billsmart
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Funds deposited of 600K + income of 60K per month.

Funds and income total 1,320K per annum.

After the seasoning period you canwithdraw 520K.

Income of 60K x 12 = 720K + 80K <deleted>nds = 800K.

 

Not sure I understand why if you have 600k deposited in bank you need higher monthly income than if you have 500k in bank and why you cans withdraw excess of 800k at any time. 

 

Or.... are the above scenarios of what some people may have now?  Even so why does excess of 800k need to be seasoned?

 

i could just be missing the obvious. 

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12 hours ago, overherebc said:

I like to live my life with a sense of humour to the fore in all things but recently I'm finding it more difficult to do. 

For a long time I did in the past have short periods where living here got to me, usually a month or so then I'd snap out of it and go with the flow.

I'm starting to feel those periods of 'annoyance' are becoming more frequent.

 

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Also, and at the risk of "throwing a wet blanket" over all this, I don't think we're anywhere close to seeing the end to all this. If you look at it from the Thai's POV, what they understandably want is some assurance that Type O and Type O-A visa holders who are living in Thailand longer term are able to financially care for themselves and will not become a burden on the state.
 
The changes to the Funds in the Bank will better do that for them.
 
The changes to the Income Method, as stated above, will not.
 
The only income that can be counted upon to be secure and consistent is a pension issued by a government agency. I'm sure the Thais know that, and the source of the "income" in the Income Method will soon be restricted to only pension, even for 30-year-old, unretired, ex-pats living here on and applying for extensions using Marriage qualifications.
 
And, I don't think the Thais will want to wade through and verify all the various documents that an ex-pat could produce to "prove" the deposits were from a government pension.
 
Also, there are many ways to show monthly, international deposits that only appear to guarantee income. You could, for example, transfer THB70K on the 1st of the month, send it back to your home country's account on the 15th, and then resend it back on the 1st of the next month. That would only cost you THB 3K or 4K at the most. I'm sure there are many other, less-obvious schemes to simulate what the Thais are looking for - proof of a secure, consistent, monthly income.

I think when all the dust settles, the only two options available will be Funds in the Bank, or the Letter from your Embassy verifying the monthly, pension income amount.
 
So, I'd advise all of you who, like me, a US citizen, whose embassy will no longer issue the affidavit verifying the source and the amount of Monthly Income, had better get ready to have the Funds in the Bank, perhaps starting in 2020.
 
That's what I am doing.

Understandable, but what measures has the Thai government in place in the case you become a “burden” . Besides deportation nothing. They even not take care there own people? In Germany you are reached not to rely only on Government pension.



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