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BANGKOK 23 July 2019 05:21
Poopyface

Any recourse ($?) for bad medical diagnosis?

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On 2/13/2019 at 1:16 PM, Just Weird said:

Who says the US doctor cannot be mistaken?

 

I see you're never disappointing, and always finding a way to defend anything and everything the Thais do here, regardless of whether they were right or wrong... Bravo!!!

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On 2/13/2019 at 2:37 PM, Sheryl said:

2. Make a written complaint to the Medical Council of Thailand.

 

Good, informative post, Sheryl...  On the Council you mention above, do you know if they can accept and deal with EN language submissions?

 

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23 hours ago, simon43 said:

I politely suggest that 'incompetent' might better replace 'fraudulent'.

 

Or potentially both...depending on the individual case... It doesn't have to be one or the other.

 

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8 hours ago, Jeffrey346 said:

I have found many Dr's here do not like to be questioned or challenged. My advise, do it and if you are not happy with the answers find another Dr.

 

The problem the patient here often has is, having a hard time knowing what to believe.

 

If the Dr. tells you you're fine, can you rely on that, or still have to worry they missed something?

 

If the Dr. here tells you you're stick, can you trust that, or have to worry they're lining you up for an unnecesary treatment and procedure.

 

I did a heart exercise stress test for the first time ever this week at a private hospital in BKK... The results according to the cardiologist and my GP said everything was fine.  So, can I trust that, or still need to worry? It's a dilemma.

 

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19 hours ago, NilSS said:

No I meant fraudulent. Medical incompetence a plenty can be found in the 'beloved' NHS and in Thailand, but there is no doubt in my mind fraudulent diagnoses are rampant in Thailand, from the most serious diagnoses, to the mundane i.e. leaving with a bag of unnecessary pills for a cold.

Overmedication is not a "fraudulent diagnosis". It is indeed prevalent here and not always  economically motivated as you may assume, even the government hospitals do it, and it actually costs them money to do so. It is a cultural thing, patients expect and want a number of different medications and equate that with "good" care, and will even get angry and insulting it given "only one" let alone none. 

 

Genuinely fraudulent practices   exist here but are far from "rampant",  Over the years I've run into cases of it here and there.

 

 

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22 hours ago, Christophers200 said:

As a retired healthcare professional, I resent your implication. Which "opinion" do you trust? The first, the second or do you then seek a third opinion? 

Never get a second opinion. Healthcare professionals would never lie. Ignore the OP,,who has proved different. 

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38 minutes ago, Sheryl said:

Overmedication is not a "fraudulent diagnosis". It is indeed prevalent here and not always  economically motivated as you may assume, even the government hospitals do it, and it actually costs them money to do so. It is a cultural thing, patients expect and want a number of different medications and equate that with "good" care, and will even get angry and insulting it given "only one" let alone none. 

 

Genuinely fraudulent practices   exist here but are far from "rampant",  Over the years I've run into cases of it here and there.

 

 

I've heard the culture excuse used for this before but I just don't buy it. Culture is used often as a BS excuse for the misfires in Thai society. People in my home country go to the doctor with a cold and expect to be given something for it too, but our doctors have the professional wherewithal not to over medicate. If you want to use the word 'culture', use it for the culture of indifference within the medical community towards malpractice.

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by NilSS
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26 minutes ago, NilSS said:

I've heard the culture excuse used for this before but I just don't buy it. Culture is used often as a BS excuse for the misfires in Thai society. People in my home country go to the doctor with a cold and expect to be given something for it too, but our doctors have the professional wherewithal not to over medicate. If you want to use the word 'culture', use it for the culture of indifference within the medical community towards malpractice.

 

 

 

 

 

I have no idea where you come from but "professional wherewithal" in the USA results in some 250,000 iatrogenic deaths/year.

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2 hours ago, TallGuyJohninBKK said:

 

Good, informative post, Sheryl...  On the Council you mention above, do you know if they can accept and deal with EN language submissions?

 

Yes.

 

But keep it clear and factual and please, no frivolous complaints.

 

And don't expect miracles or a detailed investigation, there will nto be one.  But it will help to have it as a cc on letter of complaint to a hospital or doctor.

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On 2/13/2019 at 12:44 PM, Poopyface said:

After experiencing chest pain, they ran a stress-test which they claimed proved myocardial ischemia and CAD

 

 

did the written report actually state this?

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2 hours ago, TallGuyJohninBKK said:
11 hours ago, Jeffrey346 said:

I have found many Dr's here do not like to be questioned or challenged. My advise, do it and if you are not happy with the answers find another Dr.

 

The problem the patient here often has is, having a hard time knowing what to believe.

 

If the Dr. tells you you're fine, can you rely on that, or still have to worry they missed something?

 

If the Dr. here tells you you're stick, can you trust that, or have to worry they're lining you up for an unnecesary treatment and procedure.

 

I did a heart exercise stress test for the first time ever this week at a private hospital in BKK... The results according to the cardiologist and my GP said everything was fine.  So, can I trust that, or still need to worry? It's a dilemma.

 

if uncertain, get a copy of complete test and email to a doctor you trust wherever, home country, etc.

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26 minutes ago, Poopyface said:
47 minutes ago, atyclb said:

 

 

did the written report actually state this?

Yes.

 

 

wow, amazing.

 

there was an infamous usa cardiologist doing unnecessary procedures, stents, etc just for reimbursement. i think he is in prison currently. can have bad apples anywhere but likely more in a society that lacks checks and balances and accountability

 

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2015/dec/23/convicted-doctor-harry-persaud-medicare-fraud-obamacare

 

heres a cardiologist that plotted to kill a competing cardiologist

https://newyork.cbslocal.com/2017/01/31/long-island-doctor-murder-for-hire-sentence/

https://www.newsday.com/long-island/dr-anthony-moschetto-james-chmela-james-kalamaras-in-murder-for-hire-plot-da-says-1.10267210

Edited by atyclb

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17 minutes ago, atyclb said:

 

if uncertain, get a copy of complete test and email to a doctor you trust wherever, home country, etc.

 

That's a good suggestion... But as an extension of that...

 

Remember, perhaps, there are these periodic reports on TV and the news in the big wide world outside Thailand about how nifty tele-medicine is going to be for the future. The idea being you can consult with and talk with a doctor/expert from anywhere in the world, unconstrained by country/location. And even technology that allows remote diagnostics and testing.

 

Well, I see and hear about it on TV, but I've yet to encounter it in the real world of doctors and medicine, even from the U.S.  Perhaps it's out there, and I just haven't become aware of it stuck in an intellectual black hole here in Thailand. Last time I wanted to see a particular specialist doctor in the U.S. last year, their office told me they had a 6 month waiting list for office appointments!  And that wasn't at Stanford or Johns Hopkins.

 

Edited by TallGuyJohninBKK

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