Jump to content
BANGKOK 22 April 2019 01:51
sometime

pheromones for rhino beetle

Recommended Posts

A little help please

I want to make some traps for the Rhino beetle etc, I have looked online for the bait to put in the trap but its a stupid price from overseas.

What bait do you guys use?

Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have no idea where, or even why, you want to set these traps, but I remember as a child digging holes in the garden and placing something with slippery sides (e.g. an old washed out jam jar or bucket) in it, back filling so that the rim of the jar/bucket was level with the surrounding soil. Next day, lots of bugs and once even a pygmy shrew.

I don't recall ever using bait. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't answer your question but i do have some information and experience with CRB control methods and materials and I would be happy to share if you are interested.  I don't think bait traps are widely used here, and there are some limitations.

 

Bait traps for CRB and fruit flies etc are usually marginally effective and only get a percentage of the population, still allowing for significant infestation. A combination of methods is usually most effective. Sanitation (removing dead and dying palms and cleaning up downed wood waste debris) and netting compost and manure piles to prevent the adult beetles from flying out to the palm crowns from the ground breeding sites, being major management essentials, along with chemical or biological control. Maybe that is what you are doing. 

 

"On Guam, mass trapping using CRB aggregation pheromone, ethyl 4-methyloctanoate, was ineffective for population control. Recent improvements have increased trap catch rates by more than an order of magnitude. These improvements include equipping pheromone traps with solar powered ultraviolet light emitting diodes and mounting the traps on steel drums containing artificial breeding sites."
 
There is a biological control method that is used here by Dept of Ag programs, a fungus that infects and kills the CRB larvae in the breeding sites. 
 
 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, djayz said:

I have no idea where, or even why, you want to set these traps, but I remember as a child digging holes in the garden and placing something with slippery sides (e.g. an old washed out jam jar or bucket) in it, back filling so that the rim of the jar/bucket was level with the surrounding soil. Next day, lots of bugs and once even a pygmy shrew.

I don't recall ever using bait. 

Because they are killing my foxtail palms

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, sometime said:

Because they are killing my foxtail palms

For ornamental palms you may consider a barrier insecticide application for prevention, and/or a systemic insecticide soil drench for root uptake. 

 

Pyrethroids like a cypermethrin and bifenthrin combination are inexpensive and low toxicity for mammals, and provide a month or more of residual effectiveness as a barrier if you drench the growing point and upper tree trunk with a spray solution. It binds to the surface organic matter and provides a barrier for new beetle activity, but does not penetrate tissues and go systemic for beetles that are already in the tree. 

 

Botanical (organic program) biopesticides like the neem seed extract 'Azadirachtin' are a repellent barrier and are widely available and non-toxic but more expensive and require frequent repeated spray applications, every week during high risk periods of activity.  

 

Feasibility of spraying is dependent on size of palms and spray equipment to reach the tops. 

 

Starkle-G (dinotefuran) is a widely available, potent, neonicotinoid, low toxicity systemic insecticide that is fast acting for uptake. With a soil drench application or injection there is minimal environmental contamination or danger for exposure to pollinators.  Acephate is somewhat available, and is even faster and more effective and cheaper. It is low toxicity for mammals but a stinky older generation organophosphate systemic insecticide. Either of these systemics can be stem-injected for minimal material and environmental exposure. Acephate or secondly, StarkleG would be my choice for immediate control of an active infestation for non-food ornamental palms. Not appropriate for coconut or oil palms. With this method you can save a palm that is under beetle attack, where bait traps, sanitation and biological control are longer term preventive measures. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, drtreelove said:

For ornamental palms you may consider a barrier insecticide application for prevention, and/or a systemic insecticide soil drench for root uptake. 

 

Pyrethroids like a cypermethrin and bifenthrin combination are inexpensive and low toxicity for mammals, and provide a month or more of residual effectiveness as a barrier if you drench the growing point and upper tree trunk with a spray solution. It binds to the surface organic matter and provides a barrier for new beetle activity, but does not penetrate tissues and go systemic for beetles that are already in the tree. 

 

Botanical (organic program) biopesticides like the neem seed extract 'Azadirachtin' are a repellent barrier and are widely available and non-toxic but more expensive and require frequent repeated spray applications, every week during high risk periods of activity.  

 

Feasibility of spraying is dependent on size of palms and spray equipment to reach the tops. 

 

Starkle-G (dinotefuran) is a widely available, potent, neonicotinoid, low toxicity systemic insecticide that is fast acting for uptake. With a soil drench application or injection there is minimal environmental contamination or danger for exposure to pollinators.  Acephate is somewhat available, and is even faster and more effective and cheaper. It is low toxicity for mammals but a stinky older generation organophosphate systemic insecticide. Either of these systemics can be stem-injected for minimal material and environmental exposure. Acephate or secondly, StarkleG would be my choice for immediate control of an active infestation for non-food ornamental palms. Not appropriate for coconut or oil palms. With this method you can save a palm that is under beetle attack, where bait traps, sanitation and biological control are longer term preventive measures. 

Thanks drtreelove, I started to use Starkle g a few weeks ago.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...