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Saying it like it is or dashing a patient's hopes? Cancer patient told to prepare for death

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1 hour ago, shady86 said:

This is the response when you use social security. They simply don't have enough budget to treat with universal healthcare budget.

An American?

A Republican?

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I have lost so many to that truly horrendous disease - my brother- told OK you have 5 years - dead within 6 weeks after diagnosis. 

 

My dear Mum - she knew she was dying -came to stay for 2 months at the Dusit Thani resort in Pattaya , she used to have a  total blood transfusion in the UK - then set off travelling. The staff there were absolutely brilliant and looked after her very well. 

 

So - doctors need to be honest - I have no fear of death - I have had a wonderful life - so you need to be told . 

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3 hours ago, SammyT said:

Absolute rubbish. It is the doctor's job to tell them what they need to know, not what they want to hear and then rely on them asking the right questions to get the right answer. 

It is not one sided, you know. The patient has the right to know, but he also has the right not to know. Their decision.

The doctor's duty is to respect the patient - and not force unwanted information on them. Not telling the truth does not mean lying - you just don't mention what they don't want to hear - always ready to give them all the information you have. And never forget - it is very difficult to tell how long - I have seen many survive much longer than expected and sometimes the opposite as well.

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1 hour ago, balo said:

Why is liver cancer so common in Thailand , anyone knows ? 

Plaraa (flukes) and laukhao. Also assorted "healthy Thai food".

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/26/world/asia/26iht-thailand.html

 

Quote

“The government has never taken this seriously,” Dr. Cherdchai said. “This is a disease that affects only the north and the northeast, and these are regions that have been forgotten for a long time.”

Sod the peasants, as usual.

Edited by DrTuner
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Only Doc I've had a "normal', pleasant experience with in Thailand so far is Dr. Nick.  And I don't mean only due to the ease of conversation in native English.  Both Thai Docs I've had the unfortunate experience of trying both left me gobsmacked for different reasons.

Edited by 55Jay

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I prefer the truth, although a little sugar-coating would not go awry. The following may be use to others.

 

I was correctly diagnosed with (Stage 1) colon cancer at Bumrungrad  back in April 2014 and had a successful operation to remove it. In August 2014 I went for a follow-up appointment with an oncologist at the Bumrungrad. After tests and scans I was told (and pretty bluntly) (a) that it had spread to my liver and (b) there was nothing they could do as it was inoperable. Prognosis 3-5 years to death.

 

Fortunately I had the means to go to the UK to the Royal Marsden for a second opinion. After a lot of tests and scans/MRIs over several months (repeat visits), the specialist liver/biliary duct surgeon said (a) he was pretty sure that the anomalies in the liver were NOT cancer and (b) that even if they did grow, he could remove them and the liver would re-grow. I have gone back for regular MRIs at the RM and now have (as if November last year) the all clear.

 

Am I angry at the misdiagnosis by the oncologist? No, it made me go to the UK to get that second opinion. I did however then realize that Thai doctors are apparently not trained in delivering bad news in a sensitive manner.

 

The original diagnosis followed occluded blood in a stool sample taken as part of an annual medical that I take at the Bumrungrad and a subsequent colonoscopy. There were no symptoms and without the check-up I would not have caught the cancer while it was still Stage 1.

 

Two take-aways from this. 1. Get an annual health check and 2. if the news is bad or requires a serious op, get a second opinion, preferably outside Thailand.

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11 minutes ago, Shadychris said:

netizen
Dictionary result for netizen
/ˈnɛtɪzn/
nouninformal
noun: netizen; plural noun: netizens

    a user of the Internet, especially a habitual or keen one.

Thanks for your self appraisal. With >20,000 posts in your 7 year membership on Thai Visa - an average of around 8 a day. I think it fair to say you're a 'habitual or keen' user of the internet...

Still doesn't make me a **** or as some call them, netizen...

Edited by Bluespunk

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If it was me, I’d rather be told the facts....   everything is impermanent. Including this life.

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5 minutes ago, laocowboy2 said:

I prefer the truth, although a little sugar-coating would not go awry. The following may be use to others.

 

I was correctly diagnosed with (Stage 1) colon cancer at Bumrungrad  back in April 2014 and had a successful operation to remove it. In August 2014 I went for a follow-up appointment with an oncologist at the Bumrungrad. After tests and scans I was told (and pretty bluntly) (a) that it had spread to my liver and (b) there was nothing they could do as it was inoperable. Prognosis 3-5 years to death.

 

Fortunately I had the means to go to the UK to the Royal Marsden for a second opinion. After a lot of tests and scans/MRIs over several months (repeat visits), the specialist liver/biliary duct surgeon said (a) he was pretty sure that the anomalies in the liver were NOT cancer and (b) that even if they did grow, he could remove them and the liver would re-grow. I have gone back for regular MRIs at the RM and now have (as if November last year) the all clear.

 

Am I angry at the misdiagnosis by the oncologist? No, it made me go to the UK to get that second opinion. I did however then realize that Thai doctors are apparently not trained in delivering bad news in a sensitive manner.

 

The original diagnosis followed occluded blood in a stool sample taken as part of an annual medical that I take at the Bumrungrad and a subsequent colonoscopy. There were no symptoms and without the check-up I would not have caught the cancer while it was still Stage 1.

 

Two take-aways from this. 1. Get an annual health check and 2. if the news is bad or requires a serious op, get a second opinion, preferably outside Thailand.

Ah right, reminds me when MIL had a scooter accident and injured the liver, the verdict from I think it was Pattaya Memorial that said she's gonna kick the bucket thanks to advanced liver cirrhosis (she barely drinks at all), Banglamung hospital young doc put her to bed and immediately recognized it as acute trauma. Been six years I think and she's bouncing around the kitchen happily right now. Won't go to memorial even if I accidentally cut both of my legs off, butchers.

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I gave up drinking and smoking.  I'd want to know and have the doctor buy me a carton of cigarettes and a bottle of whiskey. 

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