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BANGKOK 18 March 2019 21:19
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Death of Canadian sickened in Thailand inspires daughter's vaccine crusade

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Death of Canadian sickened in Thailand inspires daughter's vaccine crusade

Meredith MacLeod, CTVNews.ca

 

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Retired Edmonton firefighter Bill Hughes died four months after contracting Japanese encephalitis while in Thailand. (Photo courtesy of Jillian Hughes)

 

An Edmonton woman whose father died of a devastating mosquito-borne virus that caused fatal brain swelling is warning Canadians to take travel vaccines seriously.

 

Bill Hughes died in May 2016, roughly four months after he slipped into a coma after contracting Japanese encephalitis while in Thailand. He was a fit and healthy 62-year-old retired firefighter who did triathlons and loved to travel, says his daughter Jillian Hughes, who has made it her mission to raise awareness of the condition.

 

“My dad’s death was preventable and I want to keep people from making the same mistake,” she told CTVNews.ca in a phone interview. “No matter where you are travelling, educate yourself. I never thought this could happen to someone like my dad.”

 

Full story: https://www.ctvnews.ca/health/death-of-canadian-sickened-in-thailand-inspires-daughter-s-vaccine-crusade-1.4299162

 

CTV News: 2019-02-17

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Vaccines are cheap in Thailand. Well worth it to update any Inoculations/vaccinations here.
 

Although a word of warning, the Rabies Prophylaxis side effects can get very weird. Better double check what they might be and get ready for it. Good Luck.

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10 minutes ago, Orton Rd said:

Did not know there was a vaccine for it

AFAIK it's not 'health service' available, ie free. You need to inform your doctor you're heading to an area that is a risk area. Needs one or two booster shots prior to travel.

Probably expensive depending where you live.

Edited by overherebc
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Mmm food for thought that, I work in Nigeria and we lost 2 expats this year to malaria! 

I have never heard of this Japanese disease before,  

Thats one thing I hate about sakon, mosquitos are rife.

Edited by metisdead
Corrected ethnic slur toward Japanese.

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Still, there aint any vaccines against other mosquito-borne diseases like Dengue fever and Malaria, always protect from getting any mosquito bites in the first place, net, long sleeves, repellents etc. Donno if one can fully trust antimalaria prophylaxis.

Edited by RotBenz8888

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I had a jab for Japanese Encep before I went to work in rural Burma - the disease exists in many rural areas of that country.

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3 hours ago, Orton Rd said:

Did not know there was a vaccine for it

Where do you live? It's common knowledge in Thailand. Most hospitals have posters up about the different mosquito borne illneses in thailand. Not necessary if you live in BKK, but countryside I'd get it.

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4 hours ago, Orton Rd said:

Did not know there was a vaccine for it

 

There has been for about 50 years.

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4 minutes ago, Catoni said:

There are literally billions of mosquito breeding places in Thailand. Where would you like to start? Land fill all the rice paddies? Don’t even think about it.

     Rain barrels, rain pools, old tires with water sitting in them, rain gutters...... I could spend hours listing mosquito breeding grounds. A serious extensive campaign might get rid of 3% to 5% of all mosquito breeding places. 

    Get the vaccine. 

 

Rice paddies don't always produce mosquitoes, the studies have shown us that paddies in close proximity to grazing fields produce the most and that paddies producing late harvests produce the least, part of the answer will be to educate and enforce agricultural practice that does not encourage mosquito growth.

 

It is through the reduction of breeding sites that some countries have managed to reduce their malaria rate by 25% despite seeing their populations increase over the same period, so I have no idea where you plucked your 3% to 5% nonsense figure from.

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