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BANGKOK 22 April 2019 07:35
webfact

2019 Thai general election: Know this before voting

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I think they mean General election. 

.....or else!!!

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44 minutes ago, mfd101 said:

Hard to see the un- and under-educated population of Thailand coping with the complexities of all that when they enter the polling booth. My MIL can't even sign her name (just a thumb print). Most of the rest of the family can barely read 3 words. Will their votes count? or be counted?

 

Looks very like the Australian proportional preferential voting systems, carefully designed to prevent the poorest & least educated 10% of the population from casting a valid vote ...

If what you say is true why would they make voting compulsory? Not sure you have thought this through. 

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1 hour ago, SABloke said:

Interesting...does this mean that Prayuth, now a party list candidate, can not become PM through the 'outsider PM' route?

Might Article 44 be invoked - for the security of the nation - to waive this requirement with good intentions?

All perfectly legal.

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31 minutes ago, Zack61 said:

If what you say is true why would they make voting compulsory? Not sure you have thought this through. 

Voting is one thing. Casting a valid vote - one that will be counted in the election outcome - is another.

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4 hours ago, webfact said:

The 250 senators handpicked by the National Council for Peace and Order will join the 350 members of the House of Representatives to choose the next PM from lists submitted by parties that have won at least 5 per cent of the Lower House. The prospective premier needs at least 376 votes. 

Error here on the 350 lower house elected members. Should be 500. Therefore the selection grade is at least 376 from a combined houses of 750. 

 

4 hours ago, webfact said:

An “outsider”, who is not on a party list, will be eligible to become the next PM if 376 votes can be garnered from both Houses.

Another dirty junta trick that will allow Prayut to be eligible if he failed in the party nomination selection. He gets a second chance as an "outsider". 

 

Really a despicable and corrupt person not worthy of high office. 

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So in summary , makes no difference who you vote for because if NCPO does not approve or like the winning party they can nullify the results.

 

just as it makes no difference even if not nulified as 250 pre chosen can block anything and everything .

 

happy voting 🤪

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5 hours ago, webfact said:

Know this before voting

There will never be an election :cheesy: 

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The one who's gonna win the election is the one who pays the most money on votes. Around here they are going around drumming up votes ,,, some offer THB500 some offer THB 2000 ,,,, people are being asked to vote for them to get the money . Some places got 5/6 people  who can vote, You go Figure who they vote for.  😜

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1 hour ago, Pravda said:

Where can I cast my ballot? 

In the garbage bin?

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Wow, didn't realise it was 8 years since the pubs had been shut for polling day. There's a lot to be said for military governments/ one party states.

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3 hours ago, legend49 said:

No idea why farangs must read this we dont vote?

Yes that's right, and whatever outcome from this election, military (Army) will always have the main power , it's documented in the constitution , if someone try to change , there will be a new coup again !!!!!!

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2 hours ago, Artisi said:

Would you like to explain how the Australian system is designed to prevent the poorest and least educated from casting a valid vote. Looking forward to your considered response. 

It has a complicated history & I'm not about to type out a 3-page history lesson. You can look at Wikipedia for that. Three points:

(1) At the federal level - and no doubt at State level as federal practice spread across all States & territories - for the first 80 years (roughly 1920-2000) preferential voting favoured right-of-centre parties because there were 2 or 3 such parties. That's why preferential voting was introduced in the first place in 1918 & the 1920s. [All that of course quite apart from the much greater mathematical 'fairness' of preferential over first-past-the-post voting.]

 

(2) And it was the right-of-centre parties that, from the 1970s to 1990s, refused all moves to simplify the Senate proportional preferential voting system. And there's not much doubt why that was so. Once the changes were made by an ALP government, the heavens did not fall (contrary to conservatives' expectations).

 

(3) Ironically at present the system favours the ALP (left-of-centre) because of the multiple small lefty parties & assorted ratbag 'independents'.

 

In politics, as in life, perfection is a counsel of despair.

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