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BANGKOK 26 March 2019 00:44
Neeranam

Traveling only with daughter

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4 hours ago, Neeranam said:

You should never show immigrating both passports if you are a dual citizen.

By default only show the best passport for that situation. In Thailand that would be the Thai passport and at the European border (in and out) a EU passport.

 

But if for some reason you would need to make evident that you can enter the destination country or some document you carry refers to your other passport, or simply when asked, then provide the other passport. It's not against Thai law to have dual citizenship (neither is it acknowledged) so provided you are facing a competent officer, there is no harm to in cases like this provide the additional passport.

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57 minutes ago, Donutz said:

By default only show the best passport for that situation. In Thailand that would be the Thai passport and at the European border (in and out) a EU passport.

 

But if for some reason you would need to make evident that you can enter the destination country or some document you carry refers to your other passport, or simply when asked, then provide the other passport. It's not against Thai law to have dual citizenship (neither is it acknowledged) so provided you are facing a competent officer, there is no harm to in cases like this provide the additional passport.

I'm trying to remember the exact scenario, but as best I remember. 

We had checked in, they had checked his US passport, and we headed for immigration. I presented my US passport, and his Thai passport, boarding passes etc.

That was when the immigration guy demanded to see my son's US passport, and for whatever reason that set off some alarm bells, and fun the began!

Edited by GinBoy2

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18 hours ago, nontabury said:

Of course, yet I know of cases where the Thai wife, when traveling with just a half farang child/children, have not been stopped,in fact I do not know of any instances, where they have been stoped. Who knows why?

 

13 hours ago, Donutz said:

I believe 7by7 pointed ou5 that that was sort of the case with his wife, as immi didn't know he (the spouse) was there

Indeed I did; twice.

 

On 2/25/2019 at 10:17 AM, 7by7 said:

As I said earlier, my Thai wife was asked by Thai immigration when taking her Thai daughter out of Thailand.

Furthermore, as I am not the girl's biological father my presence may very well have only complicated things had my wife not had the sole custody documents.

 

13 hours ago, Donutz said:

But yeah I wouldn't be surprised of the assumption is that women are much much less likely to abduct children or maybe no risk at all, let alone when it's a fellow national. So some bias would not surprise me when it comes to these checks

I think it used to be the assumption that only fathers would abduct their child; which is not the case. A recent example: British mother Indea Ford admits abducting own children and taking them to US.

 

What seems strange about that case is despite her breaking the terms of a shared custody order by taking the children to live in Alaska without their father's consent; despite her being extradited back to the UK to stand trial and pleading guilty in court to the offence; the children are still in Alaska with their step father!

 

 

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1 hour ago, 7by7 said:

 

Furthermore, as I am not the girl's biological father my presence may very well have only complicated things had my wife not had the sole custody document

I think it used to be the assumption that only fathers would abduct their child; which is not the case. A recent example: British mother Indea Ford admits abducting own children and taking them to US.

 

Thats an odd one. The kids were small, so I'm assuming that the court decided that leaving them with the only Father they can probably remember was better.

 

But who knows. Being a judge in family court must be one of the shitest jobs in the world. Someone is always going to be pissed off at you.

 

I'm lazy to google this, but being convicted of felony in a foreign country probably means she also lost her green card, and therefore right of residency in the United States!

 

Back to the topic of which passport to use.

 

The issue @donutz mentioned about only using one passport.

The issue many of us have faced, is our kids are citizens of the country you're travelling to, therefore you're not getting them a visa for their Thai passport, since they are citizens of country xyz

You always have to show a passport at check in that shows you have a legal right of entry into the country you travelling to. 

But they live in Thailand, with a Thai passport and ID card, so you just can't get around having to use both at the airport to leave Thailand.

Now departing on the other end tends to be easier, but that's the reality of departing Thailand

Edited by GinBoy2
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On 2/26/2019 at 4:39 PM, GinBoy2 said:

The issue many of us have faced, is our kids are citizens of the country you're travelling to, therefore you're not getting them a visa for their Thai passport, since they are citizens of country xyz

You always have to show a passport at check in that shows you have a legal right of entry into the country you travelling to. 

But they live in Thailand, with a Thai passport and ID card, so you just can't get around having to use both at the airport to leave Thailand.

 

Airlines are subject to large fines 10,000 USD per passenger if memory serves, if they knowingly carry a passenger who does not have the correct entry clearance for their destination. So when passengers check in it is the passport they'll be using to enter their destination which the check in staff need to see.

 

Since being naturalised as British citizens my wife and step daughter have always done the following.

 

Leaving the UK:

  • show Thai passport at check in so airline know they can enter Thailand;
  • passports are not routinely checked when leaving the UK, but if asked show British passport to show they have not overstayed;
  • on arrival in Thailand show Thai passport to show they can be admitted without restriction.

Leaving Thailand, it's the other way around:

  • show British passport at check in;
  • show Thai passport to Thai immigration;
  • on arrival in UK show British passport.

Thai immigration have never asked them why they have no UK visa in their Thai passport, they basically couldn't care; it's not their problem if the traveler is refused entry at their destination. But if they were ever asked then they would show them their British passports. 

 

 

 

 

 

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47 minutes ago, 7by7 said:

 

Airlines are subject to large fines 10,000 USD per passenger if memory serves, if they knowingly carry a passenger who does not have the correct entry clearance for their destination. So when passengers check in it is the passport they'll be using to enter their destination which the check in staff need to see.

 

Since being naturalised as British citizens my wife and step daughter have always done the following.

 

Leaving the UK:

  • show Thai passport at check in so airline know they can enter Thailand;
  • passports are not routinely checked when leaving the UK, but if asked show British passport to show they have not overstayed;
  • on arrival in Thailand show Thai passport to show they can be admitted without restriction.

Leaving Thailand, it's the other way around:

  • show British passport at check in;
  • show Thai passport to Thai immigration;
  • on arrival in UK show British passport.

Thai immigration have never asked them why they have no UK visa in their Thai passport, they basically couldn't care; it's not their problem if the traveler is refused entry at their destination. But if they were ever asked then they would show them their British passports. 

 

 

 

 

 

Exiting Thailand is the difficult bit.

 

We never had a problem exiting the United States on our US passports, since we're visa exempt entry to Thailand, then entering on his Thai passport and my re-entry permit.

 

It was only the departure from Thailand than was a problem

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I have just finished completing this type of application for my wife and her daughter. Visa type 600.
To travel from Thailand to Australia on a Visitor visa the child needs written permission from the unaccompanied parent only If child is under the age of 18 years. If both parents are traveling with the child then no permission is needed. If you apply electronically a Form 1229 covers the child traveling with one parent that needs to be signed by the unaccompaning parent. Hope this info helps.


Sent from my iPad using Thaivisa Connect

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So correct.. Good advice.. Make sure you have all the necessary permission.


Sent from my iPad using Thaivisa Connect

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