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BANGKOK 22 March 2019 03:19
WonnabeBiker

Kingston 120 GB SSD @ $ 21, but RAM stays expensive

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Hi,

 

www.amazon.de sells a brand name Kingston 400 SSD with 120 GB for 18 Euros. But RAM stays expensive.

 

Why is that?

 

Slow computer? Get a SSD! bbbbbbbb

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Different kind of RAM.   Type of memory used in SSDs completely different than memory used for RAM sticks.  Like comparing apples and oranges.

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You won't see much difference moving from 8gb to 16gb ram and 240gb is more than enough in a typical system.

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5 hours ago, WonnabeBiker said:

www.amazon.de sells a brand name Kingston 400 SSD with 120 GB for 18 Euros. But RAM stays expensive.

Accessing data in RAMS is 100s of times faster than in SSDs (see this). Which means, as Pib says above, the technology for RAMs is completely different and more expensive.

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As computer users move to the much faster internal hard drives that are fixed directly to the motherboards, these SSDs will soon be at almost giveaway prices. By next year the 1TB SSDs will be $20.

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On 2/20/2019 at 10:46 AM, killerbeez said:

... By next year the 1TB SSDs will be $20.

Maybe SATA SSD's. What's more interesting is that M.2 NVMe are already hitting the limit of 4x PCIe 1.3 speeds. So what's next there? PCIe 1.4, or 8x PCIe?

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Posted (edited)
On 2/20/2019 at 12:03 AM, shady86 said:

You won't see much difference moving from 8gb to 16gb ram and 240gb is more than enough in a typical system.

That is not so easy.

If the user has only one or a few programs open which don't use much RAM (in this case <8GB) then more RAM won't make it any faster.

But if the users has a lot of programs open or programs which need a lot of RAM then it's not so difficult to use more than 8GB. And if that happens the computer won't show a message that there is not enough RAM. It will just be a lot slower.

I.e. my current Windows session uses in the moment 6GB with not much open - not so far away from 8GB.

 

It's easy to check in the Task Manager how much RAM is currently used.

Edited by OneMoreFarang

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2 minutes ago, OneMoreFarang said:

That is not so easy.

If the user has only one or a few programs open which don't use much RAM (in this case <8GB) then more RAM won't make it any faster.

But if the users has a lot of programs open or programs which need a lot of RAM then it's not so difficult to use more than 8GB. And if that happens the computer won't show a message that there is not enough RAM. It will just be a lot slower.

I.e. my current Windows session uses in the moment 6GB with not much open - not so far away from 8GB.

 

It's easy to check in the Task Manager how much RAM is currently used.

 

It is that easy.

 

shady is right. SSD makes far more of a noticeable difference. With SSD you won't notice the slowdown you mention.

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On 2/20/2019 at 10:46 AM, killerbeez said:

As computer users move to the much faster internal hard drives that are fixed directly to the motherboards, these SSDs will soon be at almost giveaway prices. By next year the 1TB SSDs will be $20.

'... fixed directly to the motherboard ...'  is that meaning some type of SSD integrated into the motherboard, or some other newer system / technology to store the data previously stored in spinning hard disk drives?

 

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55 minutes ago, scorecard said:

'... fixed directly to the motherboard ...'  is that meaning some type of SSD integrated into the motherboard, or some other newer system / technology to store the data previously stored in spinning hard disk drives?

 

 

 

No, they just utilise the interface normally used for graphics cards. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PCI_Express

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3 hours ago, SpaceKadet said:

Maybe SATA SSD's. What's more interesting is that M.2 NVMe are already hitting the limit of 4x PCIe 1.3 speeds. So what's next there? PCIe 1.4, or 8x PCIe?

I meant, of course, PCIe Gen3 and PCIe Gen4. My brain generally runs much faster than my fingers, and sometimes, the signals get lost or distorted in the process.

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4 minutes ago, SpaceKadet said:

I meant, of course, PCIe Gen3 and PCIe Gen4. My brain generally runs much faster than my fingers, and sometimes, the signals get lost or distorted in the process.

And I'm totally lost...

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16 minutes ago, scorecard said:

And I'm totally lost...

Don't worry, you're not alone..😁

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Posted (edited)
19 minutes ago, SpaceKadet said:

Don't worry, you're not alone..😁

Thanks. I'm absolutely not a tech person, my notebook is about 5 years old, So i've been researching a bit re buying a new notebook and looking for a machine with SSD.

 

But the early posts in this thread made me think along the lines that maybe SSD is becoming overtaken my newer / different / better technology? 

 

I'm still lost.

 

 

Edited by scorecard

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