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BANGKOK 22 March 2019 01:17
Prissana Pescud

Thai language by use of English phonetics

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I want to learn conversational Thai.

But I find that "khrup" is mostly said as "Kup"

 And it goes on. Why not say an English word "cup"

 Or Car for the ladies.

 Why is there no phonetic English Thai translator? 

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Search for Joe Cummings Thai phrasebook - he really is a game changer, when it comes to simplifying Thai verbal transliteration.

Also if you do not speak international English, you are at a small disadvantage - but, most words will be OK.

 

American English speakers have no "short" consonants or vowels, hence tend to drop "T" and mispronounce English names such as Colin - is is often pronounced "co-lin" - of course we all know "warder" (Water) and Sadurday (Saturday) and so on.

 

It is these differences in the way many of us communicate using English, that has created the mish-mash we have today.

 

Good Luck

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1 hour ago, MalandLee said:

Search for Joe Cummings Thai phrasebook - he really is a game changer, when it comes to simplifying Thai verbal transliteration.

Also if you do not speak international English, you are at a small disadvantage - but, most words will be OK.

 

American English speakers have no "short" consonants or vowels, hence tend to drop "T" and mispronounce English names such as Colin - is is often pronounced "co-lin" - of course we all know "warder" (Water) and Sadurday (Saturday) and so on.

 

It is these differences in the way many of us communicate using English, that has created the mish-mash we have today.

 

Good Luck

I am an Aussie that speaks almost the Queens English but with an Aussie accent. lol

 So I pronounce "khrup" with a reverbrating "r".

My wife says this is perfect. But everyone including the PM says "Kup".

I do wish I could speak perfect Thai but realise that this is impossible.

But to speak conversational Thai would be simpler if there was a phonetic dictionary.

The people I talk to/gesture, wave arms around eventually understand me. Maybe.

 I understand That most Thai cannot pronounce English letter of the alphabet.

And I cannot pronounce Ng at the start of a word either.

 My wife cannot pronounce her married surname. lol.

But to get started I will check up on Joe Cumming Thai phrase book. Thank you

 

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18 minutes ago, MalandLee said:

http://thai-language.com/

 

It would appear Joe recommends the above site. http://www.joecummings.com/

 

BTW Joe was born in New Orleans

thank you. I love the Southern drawl. I can copy it yee aall. Sorry, it is a party joke of mine. Still cannot speak Thai,

other than all of the greetings and drinking toasts. And a bit of Issan and Lao

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3 hours ago, impulse said:

Good luck learning to speak a tonal language using non-tonal phonetics.  It may sound like "cup" or some other word you know, but get the tone wrong and you may be calling someone a pig.

 

Like a lot of guys, you may think you are speaking perfect Thai.  But the only Thai's that will understand you are the ones who hang out with westerners.  And even they'll be confused half the time.

 

I can't tell you how many times a Thai co-worker has pulled me aside after listening to an expat who thought their Thai was pretty good, and asked me what language they were speaking.

 

 

Thanks. I tried "Learn Thai from a Farang" I never got past the chook sketch. But thanks anyway.

I was eating at a shanty restaurant today. One bloke stared at me. I said alloy mai. He laughed. Ice broken. Then I said sap mai.

That cracked him up and got me a free beer. That is all I want to learn, conversational Thai.

Especially if it gets me a free beer. 

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One of the few times you think you learn a few Thai words but learn a speech impediment too. Your "alloy" is actually Aroi, but because many are lazy or have problems with "r" it comes out "L", so new language complete with speech impediment when you listen and repeat😀

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5 minutes ago, CharlieH said:

One of the few times you think you learn a few Thai words but learn a speech impediment too. Your "alloy" is actually Aroi, but because many are lazy or have problems with "r" it comes out "L", so new language complete with speech impediment when you listen and repeat😀

But surely that is my point.

If I say aroi phonetically, no one except the elite will understand it.

The president says "Kup".

We all know it is Khrup, but who actually says it. Chrrup.

No one in my village can pronounce the "r". My wife is Prissana but every one says pisana.

I guess you are telling me to give it away. And I have no wish to tangle with a moderator. lol

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turning this around i have asked many of my thai friend's children if they are aware of the phonetic alphabet for learning english pronunciation, if it used in lessons and if there is a phonetic alphabet chart in their classroom, their answer are always; 'what?' and 'no', even those with foreign 'teachers'. i find this bizarre.

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Your right ! I always say "Cap" not krap or krup or whatever there seem to be so many variations its almost impossible, when my Thai father inl aw speaks its just a mumbled slur to my ears, Like someone totally wrecked !...lol

I get so confused on the tonal thing, and with many words (to my ear) all sound the same, we are just not trained to listen in the same way, like : come, dog, horse, or, no, burn, wood, try saying, saying "no burn wood" , and you end up with what sounds like mai mai mai, to the untrained.

Really confusing and frustrating.

I cant tell you the number of times I have totally misunderstood something because so many words sound the same to my western ear.

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2 hours ago, impulse said:

 

You're missing the point.  He leaves out the "r", but he gets the tone right.  Put the "r' in and get the tone wrong and you'll be incomprehensible, except to Thai people who hang out with and serve westerners.   But only because their livelihoods depend on being able to understand the butchered language.

 

Most of us from the west don't even hear the tones.  Just like Thai people can't hear the difference between a lot of western phonetics.

 

I try to go to the temple once a month with my wife. It allows her to catch up on village gossip

and I get an extra dose of the head monks splashing water around. It cracks both of us up.

I love the tonal language. Hits you right in the chest when they chant.

I can't do it. But I make an attempt and someone will always do the correction.

And everyone accepts that I am making the effort.

I can say the greetings and thanks and so on. Everyone appreciates my attempts.

But if I had a phonetic dictionary, I could possibly say ngkratsoi. Yes I made that up, but you get my gist. 

 

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The reason for not having such a translator is mostly: Even in english, there are many different ways to pronounce a word. Maybe you would create a system for American English. If somebody who speaks British English uses this system he will pronounce things wrong, and don't even think about how somebody from Australia, or somebody whose mother tongue isn't English, would pronounce it.

If you want to learn how to properly pronounce Thai words, you have to learn to read Thai, there is no way arround it.

 

Regarding "krap", there are just different ways to pronounce / spell it, even in written Thai, for example: ครับ / คับ / คร้าบ

And in spoken Thai there are even way more ways to pronounce it, with all kind of different tones, depending on which emotion you want to transmit when saying it.

Edited by jackdd
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