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Hi, my cat just ate a gecko and after reading online (mainly US websites), geckos carry a parasite (liver flukes) that is potentially fatal to cats. Is this also true for Thai geckos? It's our first pet here and only had her a week so are pretty new all things Pet related. 

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I don't know about liver flukes,maybe more likely if it ate a frog

as liver flukes are found in water,but you will need to get it wormed

on a regular basis, as that won't be the first or last gecko it will eat,

cats seem to love them.

regards worgeordie

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I suggest you get an ultrasound taken now as a baseline, so if your cat gets sick a repeat ultrasound will show any degradation of gall bladder/liver.

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Was it an actual gecko or a jink jok (small lizards)?

 

If a jonk jok my cats eat them all the time. Never a problem.

 

Sent from my SM-J701F using Thailand Forum - Thaivisa mobile app

 

 

 

 

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On ‎2‎/‎22‎/‎2019 at 8:16 AM, Oxx said:

I suggest you get an ultrasound taken now as a baseline, so if your cat gets sick a repeat ultrasound will show any degradation of gall bladder/liver.

Bit of an overreaction!  Are you advising owners to take their pet cats to the vets every time they eat a gecko, insect, mouse or bird?!!!

 

Cats kill and eat other small animals.  Its very very very unlikely to make a cat sick from eating a gecko.  

 

 

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My cat regularly eats tiny geckos, in fact, it seems to be her nighttime entertainment, chasing them around the house.  If it happens it happens I guess, I don't see how you can stop either the cat eating them or the geckos getting into your house. 

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4 minutes ago, jak2002003 said:

Bit of an overreaction!  Are you advising owners to take their pet cats to the vets every time they eat a gecko, insect, mouse or bird?!!!

 

Cats kill and eat other small animals.  Its very very very unlikely to make a cat sick from eating a gecko.  

 

Try re-reading what I wrote.  I was specifically recommending an ultrasound as a baseline.  It is extremely helpful if, at some time in the future, the pet gets sick and needs an ultrasound for diagnostic purposes.  The vet can see to what extent (if any) the liver has been damaged.

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Oxx said:

 

Try re-reading what I wrote.  I was specifically recommending an ultrasound as a baseline.  It is extremely helpful if, at some time in the future, the pet gets sick and needs an ultrasound for diagnostic purposes.  The vet can see to what extent (if any) the liver has been damaged.

I'm not at all sure that ultrasound is of much diagnostic use for a liver aliment, unless its very advanced cancer with extensive  damage.  A liver blood test to check enzyme levels is much more informative.  300 Bhat at most vets. 

Edited by Pilotman

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2 hours ago, Pilotman said:

My cat regularly eats tiny geckos, in fact, it seems to be her nighttime entertainment, chasing them around the house.  If it happens it happens I guess, I don't see how you can stop either the cat eating them or the geckos getting into your house. 

These are called Jink-jok in Thai and all cats eat them. My 3 consume them daily and always have. Mostly harmless. Occasionally they may contain a parasite which the cat then gets. Good idea to deworm every 3 months.

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Posted (edited)
1 minute ago, Sheryl said:

These are called Jink-jok in Thai and all cats eat them. My 3 consume them daily and always have. Completely harmless.

Cuts down on the buying of cat food I guess.  😋 I brought  my cat here from the UK.  She thinks she is in heaven with a free running buffet available 24/7.  

Edited by Pilotman
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But do deworm her every 3 months. Sometimes they pick up parasites this way (and may also from the soil, or from other prey).

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One of my cats once caught a small green snake (I've heard them called "coconut" snakes) - about 15" long and a little thicker than a pencil.

 

When I tried to take if off her, she ran off and disappeared.  I found her about an hour later with 6" or so of the tail hanging out of her mouth, and then proudly sucked-in and swallowed the rest of it like I would a piece of spaghetti.  

 

Didn't seem to do her any harm and the resulting "product" was much the same as normal...

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38 minutes ago, Pilotman said:

I'm not at all sure that ultrasound is of much diagnostic use for a liver aliment, unless its very advanced cancer with extensive  damage.

 

I guess you're not a vet, then.

 

One of my dogs was poisoned a few weeks ago.  After the initial blood tests, the vet wanted an ultrasound of the liver and gall bladder.  The ultrasound showed problems with both.  The vet said that he was hindered by not having a baseline ultrasound, so couldn't tell to what extent the problems were caused by the poisoning, and to what extent from a possible underlying condition.

 

Oh, and this wasn't a "regular" Thai vet, but a lecturer at Kasetsart University's Faculty of Veterinary Medicine.  Apparently he knows more about the use of ultrasound in pets than you.

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3 minutes ago, Oxx said:

 

I guess you're not a vet, then.

 

One of my dogs was poisoned a few weeks ago.  After the initial blood tests, the vet wanted an ultrasound of the liver and gall bladder.  The ultrasound showed problems with both.  The vet said that he was hindered by not having a baseline ultrasound, so couldn't tell to what extent the problems were caused by the poisoning, and to what extent from a possible underlying condition.

 

Oh, and this wasn't a "regular" Thai vet, but a lecturer at Kasetsart University's Faculty of Veterinary Medicine.  Apparently he knows more about the use of ultrasound in pets than you.

maybe, maybe not.  Depends on the situation, the animal concerned and the problem.  

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