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BANGKOK 24 March 2019 08:21
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Airports concessions shake-up sought

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Airports concessions shake-up sought

By   KWANCHAI RUNGFAPAISARN 
THE NATION

 

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THE THAI Retailers Association (TRA) said yesterday that it has come to an agreement with the board of the Airports of Thailand (AOT) to divide business concessions at airports into three separate contract types – for duty-free outlets; retail, food and beverage, service and banking; and duty-free pick-up counters. 

 

However, the TRA said, this concession process must be open, transparent and not monopolistic. It also said that average concession fees should comply with the international standard of 30 to 40 per cent, instead of the current 15 to 18 per cent, as it will help earn greater revenue for the country. 

 

On Wednesday, the AOT board of directors passed a resolution on the terms of reference (TOR) and approved the guidelines for granting concessions at airports. 

 

It also approved in principle the selection of duty-free and commercial operators, though no actual details of the TOR have been released. 

 

Worawoot Ounjai, TRA president, said the association was pleased that the AOT board listened to its suggestions and agreed to improve the methods of granting commercial rights at airports. 

 

“However, we want to propose that duty-free concessions should no longer be a monopoly, but be open to many players. 

 

“TRA wishes to reassert that strongly disagrees with the ‘master concession’ system announced by the AOT management for the duty-free concession at Suvarnabhumi International Airport. TRA has always proposed the advantages of dividing concessions by category, such as fragrances and cosmetics, fashion and apparel, liquor and tobacco, and electrical appliances. It had even submitted a letter to the prime minister, requesting careful consideration of the proposals. TRA will continue to maintain the facts proposed to the general public and all relevant stakeholders about the advantage of concessions by category, which is the most suitable system for Suvarnabhumi Airport,” he said. 

 

Worawoot explained that Suvarnabhumi is a large international airport with masses of passengers passing through, so there should be transparency and efficiency. He said this will also boost growth in the tourism sector, as people will find it easier to find their favourite products. 

 

“We also believe that categorising will bring as much as Bt50 billion into the country every year, in relation to increased per capita tourist spending and more arrivals. Also, Thais will do their duty-free shopping in Thailand,” Worawoot said.

 

“Airports in other countries have many duty-free operators, while Suvarnabhumi is dominated by just one,” he said, citing Incheon Airport, which has 12 operators. Similarly, duty-free at Hong Kong International Airport is run by four companies, three in Singapore’s Changi Airport, and four in Tokyo’s Narita. 

Even Phnom Penh airport has three duty-free operators even though it relatively small, he said. 

 

“In Thailand, we have three-times more tourist arrivals than South Korea, yet duty-free sales in Thailand is six-times less than in South Korea,” Worawoot pointed out.

 

TRA also believes that combining the TOR for duty-free stores in Suvarnabhumi with the airports of Chiang Mai, Hat Yai and Phuket is inappropriate, as each airport is different. The three provincial airports are only 1,000 to 1,200 square metres in size, so a master-concession system for them would be more suitable, he said. 

 

Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/Corporate/30364534

 

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-- © Copyright The Nation 2019-02-22

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5 minutes ago, yellowboat said:

I skip duty free in Thailand.  In my experience, it is the worst in Asia.  The prices of alcohol seems to be slightly lower than the inflated grocery store price.  

Yes, but, in the duty free it comes in a nicer box. 😆😆

  • Haha 2

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Smokes and mirrors and Internal terrors with brown envelops under the tables.... 

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7 hours ago, webfact said:

It also said that average concession fees should comply with the international standard of 30 to 40 per cent, instead of the current 15 to 18 per cent, as it will help earn greater revenue for the country. 

I don't understand this. Can someone please explain? 

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6 minutes ago, madmitch said:

I don't understand this. Can someone please explain? 

I also don't understand if this goes on it will mean more costs for the retailers. However what I know is that kingpower got one lease and then sub let it to others. So 15-18 might be for king power and then others might have paid to king power on top of that. So its hard to say if they are going to pay more.

 

But it looks more expensive, but its hard to say without knowing the true details of the kingpower deal.

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56 minutes ago, robblok said:

I also don't understand if this goes on it will mean more costs for the retailers. However what I know is that kingpower got one lease and then sub let it to others. So 15-18 might be for king power and then others might have paid to king power on top of that. So its hard to say if they are going to pay more.

 

But it looks more expensive, but its hard to say without knowing the true details of the kingpower deal.

It's much easier to collect backhanders from one source. 

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The duty free here isn't all that bad. I went to CM once on the day of an alcohol-sale ban and was able to buy a bottle of gin for the same price as the supermarkets. #winning

 

 

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8 hours ago, crouchpeter said:

Most duty-free alcohol in Thailand is dearer than European supermarket prices.
More bullshit talk from the leaders, as every hi-so Thai rips-off and skims the country at every turn!

Sent from my CPH1727 using Thailand Forum - Thaivisa mobile app
 

I told a worker in world of duty free at Heathrow last year that the gin was cheaper in Sainsburies, he said yeah I know. None of these places are duty free, it's the biggest scam in travel.

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1 hour ago, rkidlad said:

The duty free here isn't all that bad. I went to CM once on the day of an alcohol-sale ban and was able to buy a bottle of gin for the same price as the supermarkets. #winning

 

 

But the gin sure is very bad, can't understand the folks who drink that stuff voluntarily .

 

Because of this forum i bought a bottle of it taxfree some years ago, it's still standing in a corner of the kitchen. Maybe i can repel ants with it? 

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4 minutes ago, fruitman said:

But the gin sure is very bad, can't understand the folks who drink that stuff voluntarily .

 

Because of this forum i bought a bottle of it taxfree some years ago, it's still standing in a corner of the kitchen. Maybe i can repel ants with it? 

I bought Bombay Sapphire. A very good gin - if that's your tipple. 

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12 minutes ago, rkidlad said:

I bought Bombay Sapphire. A very good gin - if that's your tipple. 

Yup, that's the one....i'm going to dump it in the drain right now....can't see that bottle anymore and i won't give it to anybody because it makes me look bad if i do so.

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