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Jingthing

Expats in Thailand considering moving to Latin America prompted by Thai visa changes

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OK, hopefully we don't have people that are considering expatriating to Venezuela, but what's happening in Venezuela has already had a major impact on Latin American nations that are of more usual expat interest.

 

So the question is, how bad is it really there, and is it headed to be even worse?

 

On politics threads we have various views. Well I haven't watched many of these Indigo Traveller vlog videos yet but this series is by a two week "tourist" there that  has visited different kinds of places including the kinds of places that are used as propaganda to show that things are really OK there. 

 

In any case could be interesting viewing and may give a different perspective on the conditions there. He's not pretending to be a conventional journalist so it's different than what you'll see on news media. 

 

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCXulruMI7BHj3kGyosNa0jA/videos

 

 

Edited by Jingthing

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Some comments on the Panama friendly nations visa --

 

 

 

My own interest in a possible second citizenship is really about residence security rather than a tax angle as interests wealthy people. In other words, no need to worry about visas. 

Edited by Jingthing

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On the question of whether to stop a long while first in the U.S. going from Thailand and then on to Latin America, I think that is really a personal situation matter. I think in general U.S. people have ties in the U.S. that would need attending to before moving on. This gets into complex matters of your banking arrangements, your social security situation, your options for shorter stays in the U.S., your need for U.S. based documents for Latin American visa purposes, better options or not for applying for visas in the U.S. vs. the target country, etc. So I'm assuming probably the majority would not be moving directly to Latin America. But some people might have a situation where they can skip the U.S. step. 

Edited by Jingthing

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On ‎3‎/‎4‎/‎2019 at 8:59 PM, Jingthing said:

I think it's fair to assume the majority of expats in Thailand looking at Latin American choices

Those, or anyone that is looking elsewhere just because of visa changes just don't love Thailand enough. If they did, they'd never leave, no matter how difficult it gets.

I also think that they'll never be happy anywhere, as everywhere has problems.

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To add on the transition period in the U.S. (or whatever your home country) which practically may be either necessary or desirable, that adds yet another considerable expense to the entire process of moving from Thailand to Latin America.

 

Previously I mentioned some rough estimates on the costs to do this. It's a lot. You've got an exploratory trip or trips that are very far away from Thailand. Hopefully long enough to go beyond the tourism honeymoon phase. You can skip that of course but better not to.  Then the new visa costs which often involve lawyers, in some countries that means several thousand dollars. Then the newbie period where you're going to likely be paying gringo prices until you get the local knowledge and connections to go more local (maybe never but possible). Then the housing costs on a more permanent place which in Latin America may involve a very large security deposit up to a year of rent. Or to buy something new. Then to furnish. Then a vehicle if you want or need. When you add it all up it could fairly easily approach long term Elite Card levels to help stay in Thailand. 

 

Maybe worth it if you end up satisfied in the new place, but you'll never know that in advance. 

Edited by Jingthing
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An expat health insurance / health care overview with specific references to some Latin American nations and also … Thailand.

Quote

Health care is a pivotal issue for expats; It also poses problems for insurance companies

 

https://cuencahighlife.com/health-care-becomes-a-pivotal-issue-for-those-retiring-overseas-it-also-poses-problems-for-insurance-companies/

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I always thought Japan might be too expensive.  Has anybody considered Indonesia or the west coast of Africa such as gambia or Senegal?
 
 Expats in Thailand considering moving  prompted by Thai visa change. 
Latin America only please.
Other potential destinations are already or can be covered on other topics.

Sent from my Lenovo A7020a48 using Thailand Forum - Thaivisa mobile app

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Multiple off topic posts about Japan, Africa, Texas, TM30 and US social security have been removed also replies, please stay on topic, thank you.

 

Expats in Thailand considering moving to Latin America prompted by Thai visa changes

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WHO global country rankings.

No Latin American countries in the top 20, but Colombia rating the highest in Latin America by a lot at 22. Higher than so called "first world" Chile. But given that Venezuela is rated at a relatively high 54 I suspect this survey is either very flawed, very dated, or both. It's well known how bad the health care situation is in Venezuela now. 

 

Some other Latin American nations --

Costa Rica 36

Mexico 61

Uruguay 65

Argentina 75

Ecuador 111

Brazil 125

Peru 129

 

http://thepatientfactor.com/canadian-health-care-information/world-health-organizations-ranking-of-the-worlds-health-systems/

 

A comparison of Ecuador and Colombia is interesting. Both are neighbors and both are of significant expat interest. Both have some kind of "universal" health care systems that include buy ins for resident expats. But Colombia is rather much higher. Why? Well a theory I've heard is that Ecuador's national system is completely government run while Colombia's (called EPS) is structured to have private company competition even in the base nationalized part of the system. Buying private on top is an option if you can afford it and are young and healthy enough. 

 

Edited by Jingthing
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Hi

 

Some thoughts on healthcare and also WHO rankings.

 

A good quality healthcare system is fairly high up on my list of priorities, maybe less so for others.

I have also seen the WHO rankings and yes, Colombia at 22, quite impressive.

I noticed some puzzling rankings so dug a bit deeper.

 

It seems that WHO have 5 main criteria in ranking various countries healthcare.

 

1 is responsiveness levels.

 

 2nd is responsiveness distribution.

 

3rd is Fair Finance.

 

4th is health inequality, a suggestion by WHO  is that no one should pay a higher % of their net disposable income than someone else for healthcare.

 

5th I do not understand so no comment.

 

Within the above is also taken in to account communication with patient, i.e if ill/injured are options openly discussed?

If so, it helps that country to get a higher ranking.

Number of doctors per population also plays a part.

 

The 5 factors are not weighted equally.

 

Colombia has a national ambulance service, SAMU. I would regard that as positive.

It also seems to attract some medical tourism, with generally good reports.

 

 

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You beat me to it posting about that.

Yes, that's very concerning news about FARC. It's not particularly surprising though. I suppose developments like this will dissuade some people from considering Colombia as an expat destination and maybe it should. But I seriously doubt very many settled expats already there in places like Medellin are packing their bags. Yet.

 

Another way to look at this from a Thailand perspective. There has been a violent conflict within Thailand for many decades. It's mostly been focused in certain parts of South Thailand. I don't think very many  potential expats didn't move here or left because of that conflict.

 

Not saying they are the same thing, but just added for some perspective. 

Edited by Jingthing
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