Jump to content
BANGKOK
Jingthing

Expats in Thailand considering moving to Latin America prompted by Thai visa changes

Recommended Posts

6 minutes ago, grifbel said:

Straw man troll baiting ignored.  Persistent stalking reported  again

None of those accusations have any bearing to the truth.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/9/2019 at 2:26 PM, EricTh said:

There are still many Americans/Canadians trying to get into Thailand (and some were denied entry) even though Latin America is so much nearer to home.

 

I wonder why..

 

 

It's a fair question and here is my response.

 

-- North Americans are attracted to Thailand for the same reasons other nationalities are.

-- Some may have sampled some Latin American nations and Thailand and decide that they like Thailand much better

-- Some may know about the onerous visa rule changes and feel that dealing with them is worth it to them personally. 

-- Some may not know about the onerous visa rule changes

-- Geography matters. Yes it's normal and natural that there are massively more American and Canadian expats in Mexico than in Thailand based on proximity alone. But it isn't a total determinant, Many are willing to go much further and not only to Thailand.

-- I don't see that it proves anything at all that some Americans are still choosing to move to Thailand. 

-- There is no agenda here to promote the idea that moving to Latin America is for everyone. It clearly is not. Nor is moving to Thailand.

 

Cheers

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, grifbel said:

Let's stay on topic people, otherwise the thread could be closed.   The topic is "Expats in Thailand considering moving to Latin America prompted by Thai visa changes", and NOT the silly straw man argument, "do lots of Americans travel to Mexico?".  With so many American cities such as El Paso and San Diego right on the border, obviously plenty of people go, even driving across for the day.

Well...let's look at this way-the average latino/latina would eat any expat from SE Asia for breakfast.

 

Whereas the average Thai would look upon the usual expat with puzzled affection until the money ran out.

 

So..the options are to be screeched at in Spanish -Latin based European language which is quite easy to learn.

 

Or be berated in a language which has over 40 consonants,4-5 tones and a written alphabet unknown to any others on the planet...

 

The choice is yours as I couldn't give a flying squirrel on the subject.😅

  • Confused 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, Odysseus123 said:

Well...let's look at this way-the average latino/latina would eat any expat from SE Asia for breakfast.

 

Whereas the average Thai would look upon the usual expat with puzzled affection until the money ran out.

 

So..the options are to be screeched at in Spanish -Latin based European language which is quite easy to learn.

 

Or be berated in a language which has over 40 consonants,4-5 tones and a written alphabet unknown to any others on the planet...

 

The choice is yours as I couldn't give a flying squirrel on the subject.😅

I'm not fully clear on what you're saying exactly but in my experiences traveling including some longer stays in Latin America I feel the locals generally expect people to speak at least some basic Spanish even if it's just polite greetings. I think they would consider a longer term expat not speaking it as both stupid and disrespectful. In Thailand I don't think long term expats not speaking Thai are seen as stupid, they know they have a difficult language, but disrespectful yes. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/4/2019 at 3:30 PM, EricTh said:

Thailand is no longer cheap, if you are from America, latin America would  be more sensible to live bcos it's nearer.

 

What is the cost of living there compared to Thailand?

I spent 10 years back and forth from America to Panama. (Job Related) I don't speak Spanish. I thought after a while I would go out of my mind. Some Panamanians speak English, but normally won't. While Panama can be cheap. Living a "gringo" lifestyle will cost you. Getting anything done within any normal timeframe is next to impossible. Service anywhere is very slow. Panamanians are somewhat like the Thai people. You have your haves and have nots. The elite live well, while the others struggle day to day. Panama uses the dollar, so that was pretty good. But, the food is the worst. Almost no taste to it at all. I don't think I would be able to go back and live in Panama. Too boring and I don't have as much hair to pull out anymore.

  • Thanks 1
  • Haha 1
  • Confused 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Longcut said:

I spent 10 years back and forth from America to Panama. (Job Related) I don't speak Spanish. I thought after a while I would go out of my mind. Some Panamanians speak English, but normally won't. While Panama can be cheap. Living a "gringo" lifestyle will cost you. Getting anything done within any normal timeframe is next to impossible. Service anywhere is very slow. Panamanians are somewhat like the Thai people. You have your haves and have nots. The elite live well, while the others struggle day to day. Panama uses the dollar, so that was pretty good. But, the food is the worst. Almost no taste to it at all. I don't think I would be able to go back and live in Panama. Too boring and I don't have as much hair to pull out anymore.

Thanks for that account about your time in Panama. I haven't been to Panama but I suppose Costa Rican food is similar and it was the most boring food country I've ever visited. Were you in the Panama City area? Panama City is definitely an expensive place to live in Latin America. More provincial areas of course more affordable. 

You were responding to a question about costs in Latin America. It's a very big place. It really depends on which country and where in that country.

It's no secret I've become very interested in Colombia. Right now their currency is super weak compared to the dollar. In provincial cities very nice modern places in good neighborhoods can be rented for 300ish dollars. That wouldn't be possible (not even close) in Panama City.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Longcut said:

I spent 10 years back and forth from America to Panama. (Job Related) I don't speak Spanish. I thought after a while I would go out of my mind. Some Panamanians speak English, but normally won't. While Panama can be cheap. Living a "gringo" lifestyle will cost you. Getting anything done within any normal timeframe is next to impossible. Service anywhere is very slow. Panamanians are somewhat like the Thai people. You have your haves and have nots. The elite live well, while the others struggle day to day. Panama uses the dollar, so that was pretty good. But, the food is the worst. Almost no taste to it at all. I don't think I would be able to go back and live in Panama. Too boring and I don't have as much hair to pull out anymore.

And now you’re in Thailand where all is perfect for you is it?.

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A generality that can be made is that major cities are going to be more expensive than provincial cities pretty much everywhere. As I've been focused on Colombia the bigger tourist draws of Medellin, Bogota, and Cartagena are among the highest cost places. Get into cities most foreigners haven't ever even heard of and the costs do drop dramatically (at least based on my research which at this point is pretty significant). For example try Santa Marta on the Caribbean instead of Cartagena and save a bundle. 

 

As said before Panama City is an expensive place.

Costa Rica now has a reputation as getting too expensive for many expats.

Argentina even though I have been there you've got the crazy cyclical financial crises there so I guess that depends on when you go, whether you're bring in dollars, etc.

 

As far as Thailand being much cheaper, as in Latin America that is location specific but as a generality Thailand has become significantly more expensive for many in recent years because of the absurdly strong baht, massive medical care inflation, and for long term people onerous visa rule changes increasing those costs as well for many. 


Cheers. 

Edited by Jingthing
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

https://www.businessinsider.com/latin-america-is-the-worlds-most-violent-region-crime-2019-9?r=US&IR=T

 

400 murders a day: 10 reasons why Latin America is the world's most violent place

Outside of active war zones, Latin America is the world's most violent region, despite some variations among countries there.

No single thing explains why there's so much bloodshed, but there are several factors common throughout the region.

 

Latin America is home to about 8% of the world's population but has about one-third of its homicides — in 2016, that meant some 400 homicides a day, or roughly 146,000 a year. But the bloodshed is not evenly distributed. 

 

.......

Edited by grifbel

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The safety and violence issue in Latin America is always a big bugaboo but consider these points:
 
-- Latin America is a big place with lots of diversity among countries and within countries
-- Expats generally (and wisely) choose to live in safer areas whether at the macro or micro level. For example if moving to Lima you will find most in Miraflores (micro). If moving to Mexico, choosing the Lake Chapala area over Veracruz (macro). And on and on. 
-- There are irrational extremes in the characterization of violence. At the one end over the top fear mongering and at the other ridiculous defensiveness of some expats saying there is no problem at all. The reality in my opinion is somewhere in the middle especially considering my point that naturally most expats choose relatively safer locales.
-- Adjustment in behavior. An expat moving from a safer country and I would include most areas of Thailand and places like small town Canada for example would need to become more security conscious. Good locks on doors, doormen in buildings, not wearing flashy clothes or flashing cash, learning the dodgy neighborhoods, not leaving their phone on restaurant tables, not even using their phone in public in many locations, usually taking taxis at night especially when alone and then knowing the safer methods of getting the taxis, etc. A person coming from a more typically violent city in the U.S. probably has much less of an adjustment to being security conscious. For some people that could be a deal breaker and for some people maybe it should be. It is no doubt a negative. But the flip side in my view is that many people are irrationally overly afraid of Latin America so that serves to keep many more locations "virginal" as far as not being corrupted by an oversaturation of expats.
 

Now you’ve done extensive research and had great input on this thread ( good and bad ) have you decided when you’re leaving?

Also pls report back with your transition.


Sent from my iPhone using Thailand Forum - Thaivisa mobile app
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-50092641

El Chapo: Mexican police free drug lord's son as Culiacán battle erupts

 

 

 

Heavy fighting broke out in northern Mexico on Thursday after security forces detained a son of the jailed drug kingpin Joaquín "El Chapo" Guzmán.

Fighting raged for several hours after Ovidio Guzmán López was found during a routine patrol in the city of Culiacán.

Footage showed heavily-armed men firing on police, with cars, bodies and burning barricades strewn in the road.

Police withdrew without Mr Guzmán in their custody to avoid further violence, officials said.

Mexico's security minister, Alfonso Durazo, told Reuters news agency that a patrol of National Guard militarised police came under intense fire from outside the house where they had located Mr Guzmán, forcing them to retreat from the building for their own safety and "to recover calm in the city".

A lawyer for the Guzmán family told the Associated Press, "Ovidio is alive and free."

Mexico's President Andrés Manuel López Obrador said he would hold a meeting of his security cabinet to discuss the incident.

Edited by grifbel

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...