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Expats in Thailand considering moving to Latin America prompted by Thai visa changes

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Just now, grollies said:

I have already posted numerous times I wouldn't recommend that. It has been attractive especially in Grenada previously, but not now, and it's hard to say when it will be again. 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Mike Teavee said:

Following with interest as I'd like to spend a bit of time in South America before I commit to where I am going to fully retire 

 

If I had to pick based on the very limit knowledge I have it would be Costa Rica, Columbia, Ecuador or Panama (in that order)

My current list by nation is in this order. But I have specific locations in those countries as well. That makes a BIG difference exactly where.

 

For some reasons which I don't fully understand (yes I've been there personally and didn't really love it) Costa Rica has become much less popular than in decades past.

 

Colombia (top by a lot)

Mexico

Ecuador and Peru (tied)

Panama (not very seriously)

Uruguay (not very seriously)

 

Edited by Jingthing
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If this confuses people they are not very intelligent.  But then who ever accused Thai Visa members of being intelligent.  It really is quite simple.

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Posted (edited)

I have some additional areas to add to your personal priorities list to help narrow down the choices.

 

Language -- If you know you won't ever learn Spanish (or Portuguese for Brazil) there is Belize, which is English speaking. Or you could choose a gringo ghetto in various countries, but bring more money. 

 

Friendliness of the people -- Some nations have deserved reputations for warmth and friendliness. For example Peruvians less warm and friendly than Colombians as a very gross generalization. Of course to be widely social in most of Latin American that isn't going to make much difference unless you learn Spanish.

 

Isolation level? What do you do when you need to visit your embassy if you're not living in the capital city? Is it difficult and expensive to visit? Some nations even require visa application only in the capital as in Lima Peru which means people choosing to live in isolated Arequipa are greatly inconvenienced. 

 

Also what about travel, domestically and international? Are there direct flights to your home country? Is your new home a hub or subject to high airfares and/or hair raising 20 hour bus rides to most everywhere. An example of a great international hub is Panama City. An example of much more isolation is Arequipa, Peru. 

 

Cost of imports! Food, electronics, cars, etc. This can be a big deal. Some countries can appear to be deceptively cheap until you factor in the import duties especially on big ticket items. For food you have a choice, you can adapt and eat more local, but you're gonna need your electronics!

Edited by Jingthing

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 A great place to visit is Chile.

 

Rarely rates a mention on the charts-but as a holiday,it's tops.

 

Most posters go home (intelligent) rather than rush of to Tierra del Fuego.

 

I certainly haven't seen too many posters fleeing from Thailand reporting back..however I have two friends in Mexico who love it.

 

Maybe they met their event horizon and were extinguished...

 

 

 

 

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Posted (edited)
8 minutes ago, brokenbone said:

hi JT, i think caribbean rightfully belong to this thread

as all EU countries and england qualifies for PR /citizenship

in caribbean

https://www.quora.com/Where-can-the-UK-and-EU-citizens-live-in-the-Caribbean

I think that's fair enough especially considering the Latin American nature of certain places in the Caribbean such as Cuba, Dominican Republic, and U.S. "colony" (sorry) Puerto Rico. Of course Americans moving to Puerto Rico wouldn't be an expat thing but it would be for all other nationalities.

Edited by Jingthing

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2 minutes ago, Odysseus123 said:

 A great place to visit is Chile.

 

Rarely rates a mention on the charts-but as a holiday,it's tops.

 

Most posters go home (intelligent) rather than rush of to Tierra del Fuego.

 

I certainly haven't seen too many posters fleeing from Thailand reporting back..however I have two friends in Mexico who love it.

 

Maybe they met their event horizon and were extinguished...

 

 

 

 

Where specifically in Mexico?

I've been to many places in Mexico but the only three places I am considering there now I haven't been to as yet.

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3 minutes ago, Odysseus123 said:

 A great place to visit is Chile.

 

Rarely rates a mention on the charts-but as a holiday,it's tops.

 

Most posters go home (intelligent) rather than rush of to Tierra del Fuego.

 

I certainly haven't seen too many posters fleeing from Thailand reporting back..however I have two friends in Mexico who love it.

 

Maybe they met their event horizon and were extinguished...

 

 

 

 

Chile has an unusual retirement visa program. Applicants are individually evaluated based on where they choose to settle. Meaning you would need a higher financial for Santiago vs. the provinces. There is no hard number that they state for all (the last time I checked). That said I have some research on Chile and have personally rejected it as a place to move. But it may be perfect for others.

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@Jingthing My point wasn't to take into consideration already identified social and economic problems, it was to make an effort to identify potential future problems, even though things are fine right now. Argentina is a good example. It showed up at the top of expat destinations a few years back and - boom - the economy collapsed. Maybe a little research beforehand into it's economic and fiscal health might have spotted this.

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Just now, Gecko123 said:

@Jingthing My point wasn't to take into consideration already identified social and economic problems, it was to make an effort to identify potential future problems, even though things are fine right now. Argentina is a good example. It showed up at the top of expat destinations a few years back and - boom - the economy collapsed. Maybe a little research beforehand into it's economic and fiscal health might have spotted this.

I mostly agree but personally I don't think Argentina has been generally rated all that high over the years largely because of their rather predictable history of messing up their finances.

 

In possible contrast, Colombia is a really interesting case. Probably the majority of westerners still associate it with narco violence and civil war, yet those issues have been significantly reduced in the narco case for a really long time now. 

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2 hours ago, BritManToo said:

Not much sex available there for old men ....... which is why we chose the third world.

Can't imagine anyone except for Americans considering SA.

Had some hot girls in Malta.........

Just saying

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2 hours ago, RotBenz8888 said:

I stayed in Rio 2 months and got robbed at knife point twice, in broad daylight. Not to mention all those times i managed to escape. Been in Bangkok 15 years, so far no such incident. I love Rio, wonderful music, food and ladies but, i just think it's to dangerous.

 

Where on earth did you stay in Rio?

Before my first visit, we too imagined it would be rife with crime. But we went everywhere, even places we weren't supposed to go, by accident wandering into the 'wrong' favela.

Perhaps we are just lucky. Been there at least four times now.

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55 minutes ago, Nyezhov said:

Hey watch this

Culturally, you have very little in common with anyone in Latin America Your ability to make friends there (or folks to hang out with) depends on you and the crowd you chose. Better learn Spanish. If you have money and a good job, you may find yourself in better circles than just some random dude. Upper class Latin American circles dont need you.

Edited 52 minutes ago by Nyezhov

I've spoken Spanish for a while, visited Spain every year from age 6 onwards, and often listen to Bachata and Reggaeton.

Culturally I have a lot in common with Spanish speaking people.

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