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Expats in Thailand considering moving to Latin America prompted by Thai visa changes


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7 minutes ago, marcusarelus said:

I'm trying not to sugar coat diarrhea in Latin America.  

A good colonic cleanse is healthy...imagine walking around with all that junk inside you.  Don't knock it if you haven't had one food related or not🤣

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What some 60 years old 2 times divorced woman from Sheffield not good enough for you? 🤣 We all know why we are in Asia. The culture. 

there is zero chance of me riding my motorcycle ALONE all over anywhere south of the USA border.   Travel Thailand alone no problems anywhere. 32,000 kilometers worth of motorcycle road trip

I stayed in Rio 2 months and got robbed at knife point twice, in broad daylight. Not to mention all those times i managed to escape. Been in Bangkok 15 years, so far no such incident. I love Rio, wond

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OK, this is somewhat tangential but it relates to my previous comments about "Ethnic Blending" which really relates to the experience of outsiders visiting or living anywhere, though the topic here is Latin America specific.

 

I had "invented" the phrase Ethnic Blending independently but it turns out the concept already exists and it means something very different. It's about literal genetic mixing in a biological sense. Such the process where ethnic Han Chinese became so completely dominant in China.

 

So I'll call what I meant to be the Ethnic Blending In factor instead. In other words, how much (or not) your look if you adjust your dress to be local will appear to not be necessarily foreign in different locales.

 

So I'm posting this video which presents some interesting and possibly surprising theories about the history of ethnic Jewish influence (and also Arabic) in Latin America (mostly Sephardim as opposed to Ashkenazi more prevalent in Europe and the USA, Canada). Does that seem too specific? Not really. Because the video gets into the topic of how massively ETHNICALLY DIVERSE Latin America is in general. Now I really don't know how credible this source is, but I still think it's interesting enough to post.

 

The point being is perhaps a very wide range of ethnic "looks" would blend in quite well in a lot of places in Latin America. Exceptions might be very blonde people but even they might not stand out in Argentina or Chile. Certain Asians can sometimes pass for indigenous Latin American people as well.

 

 

 

Edited by Jingthing
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OK, this is somewhat tangential but it relates to my previous comments about "Ethnic Blending" which really relates to the experience of outsiders visiting or living anywhere, though the topic here is Latin America specific.
 
I had "invented" the phrase Ethnic Blending independently but it turns out the concept already exists and it means something very different. It's about literal genetic mixing in a biological sense. Such the process where ethnic Han Chinese became so completely dominant in China.
 
So I'll call what I meant to be the Ethnic Blending In factor instead. In other words, how much (or not) your look if you adjust your dress to be local will appear to not be necessarily foreign in different locales.
 
So I'm posting this video which presents some interesting and possibly surprising theories about the history of ethnic Jewish influence (and also Arabic) in Latin America (mostly Sephardim as opposed to Ashkenazi more prevalent in Europe and the USA, Canada). Does that seem too specific? Not really. Because the video gets into the topic of how massively ETHNICALLY DIVERSE Latin America is in general. Now I really don't know how credible this source is, but I still think it's interesting enough to post.
 
The point being is perhaps a very wide range of ethnic "looks" would blend in quite well in a lot of places in Latin America. Exceptions might be very blonde people but even they might not stand out in Argentina or Chile. Certain Asians can sometimes pass for indigenous Latin American people as well.
 
 
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When you off again?




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5 minutes ago, marcusarelus said:

Next time you want to ignore someone don't answer instead of bating them back. 

Bait ignored.

 

Quote

"I'm not a master fisherman, but I know bait when I see it, and I'm not gonna take it"

Mayor Pete

 

 

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Just now, JaiLai said:


...
I’m looking at Guyana as a possible destination, English is widely spoken, looks lovely.

Thoughts?


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I know nothing about living in Guyana so no comment. As you claim to be interested, you are welcome to post your findings here.

 

Thanks in advance. 

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I know nothing about living in Guyana so no comment. As you claim to be interested, you are welcome to post your findings here.
 
Thanks in advance. 

Guyana, country located in the northeastern corner of South America. Indigenous peoples inhabited Guyana prior to European settlement, and their name for the land, guiana (“land of water”), gave the country its name. Present-day Guyana reflects its British and Dutch colonial past and its reactions to that past. It is the only English-speaking country of South America. Since Guyana gained its independence in 1966, the country’s chief economic assets have been its natural resources, mainly its pristine rainforests, sugarcane plantations, rice fields, and bauxite and gold reserves. Despite those riches, Guyana remains one of the poorest countries in South America. Some geographers classify Guyana as a part of the Caribbean region, which they deem to include the West Indies as well as Guyana, Belize, Suriname, and French Guiana on the South American mainland. The capital and chief port of Guyana is Georgetown.

As you see they speak English so you’d be able to ditch your Spanish lessons that you’re struggling with.

Your welcome


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10 minutes ago, JaiLai said:


Guyana, country located in the northeastern corner of South America. Indigenous peoples inhabited Guyana prior to European settlement, and their name for the land, guiana (“land of water”), gave the country its name. Present-day Guyana reflects its British and Dutch colonial past and its reactions to that past. It is the only English-speaking country of South America. Since Guyana gained its independence in 1966, the country’s chief economic assets have been its natural resources, mainly its pristine rainforests, sugarcane plantations, rice fields, and bauxite and gold reserves. Despite those riches, Guyana remains one of the poorest countries in South America. Some geographers classify Guyana as a part of the Caribbean region, which they deem to include the West Indies as well as Guyana, Belize, Suriname, and French Guiana on the South American mainland. The capital and chief port of Guyana is Georgetown.

As you see they speak English so you’d be able to ditch your Spanish lessons that you’re struggling with.

Your welcome


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That's not a legitimate post. You did a big paste dump and even failed to source it.

 

https://www.britannica.com/place/Guyana

 

It was clear that I was suggesting that you post information that is more potential EXPAT specific. Visas, cost of living, quality of life for expats, etc. 

 

BTW, Belize is another English speaking nation in the region. However, I don't qualify for their visa and I wouldn't want to live there anyway even if I did. But some people might. Sure not needing to learn a foreign language is a plus for most of us, but it's not the only thing to consider. 

 

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