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Riding position on the road

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Personally I prefer to stay in the middle of the lane because around here there's too much debris and loose stuff on the shoulder.

It does mean I have be ready to move over to the shoulder when oncoming traffic doesn't give a toss about me and decides to overtake a slower moving vehicle in front of them. 

If I stay too far left I'm in danger of buffalos and cows that venture onto the road, as well as people pulling out onto the road without looking. 

Unfortunately, more likely un-tethered dogs (in my case & 10 days in a Trauma Ward)


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Posted (edited)
On 3/10/2019 at 4:04 PM, HLover said:

Please post videos of his escapades.

I think that guy types in third person - He is referring to himself. His handle seems to give that away. Not judging, though... Sometimes I type with a lisp for amusement.

 

To the OP, there are a couple of good posts on the first page. A defensive line on Thai (or all roads in the world) is a good option. There are plenty of tracks to scrape a peg. The one on the way to Kaeng Krachan in Petburi is a gem for tyre shredding fun.

 

On roads, I use a defensive line as noted above and by a few other posters. It offers you safety and still allows you a lot of enjoyment with a 'slow in, fast out' style. For example on a right hand turn, set your entry speed, hold a steady throttle. If you are already familiar with trail braking, do so to keep the forks compressed and minimise the bike's rake. That will give you better turn in. You should have your legs gripping the tank to stablise yourself and have your abdominal muscles engaged. There should be minimal load on your wrists.

 

Be safely on the left side of the lane but stay out of the inevitable rubble you find on the road side. Turn decisively and with force by pushing your right bar forward. Make sure you body is in good position as are both your feet. Left foot heel jammed against the peg with thigh hugging the tank. Right foot on the ball of your feet. Reach your body out to kiss the right hand mirror. look through the corner at all times. Aim for your your run through the corner to get you nearer to the centre line on your side of the lane.

 

If you see a car coming, you can easily run wide safely to get clear road. If all clear you can be twisting on the gas harder as you stand the bike up more. Actually by adding more throttle it will force the bike to want to stand up. If you can't see through the corner, slow down before you enter.

 

Rinse and repeat with a grin from ear to ear.

 

There will be a million better examples of a defensive line han what I have written here. Do a search and read and practice, read and practice. Keep a racing line for race tracks or very open clear roads where you can see oncoming traffic. The only racetrack tricks I use on the road are trail braking the front and using the rear brake gently to assist turning the bars harder to tighten my cornering if I am making a defensive move away from a pothole or the like. I actually use my rear brake a lot for stability, not just for braking.

 

One thing I would say is never stay in the far left side for long. Debris always ends up there. That means screws, nails, bits of wire and glass. It increases your chance of punctures.

 

Other times I move to the right of the lane is when there is a T intersection or cross roads where someone can pull out in front of me. One example is when I want to stay a little closer to the left is when I'm cresting a blind hill. I don't want to be too far left because there is always the possibility of a bike or trike going in either direction, but I would never want to be near the centre line.

 

I'll position myself so I can see around a car in front of me. I usually keep an eye on the vehicle in front of the vehicle in front of me's brake lights. It gives me that little bit extra reaction time which I have noticed I am starting to need these days.

 

Road conditions and line of sight and oncoming traffic guide me in my road positions.

 

 

Edited by Farangwithaplan
added

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16 hours ago, Farangwithaplan said:

You should have your legs gripping the tank to stablise yourself and have your abdominal muscles engaged.

:cheesy:

Yawn.

You are preaching to the majority of riders on step thru scooters here.

The tank is under the seat........

 

As for abdominal muscles, depends what i had for lunch........

 

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3 hours ago, thaiguzzi said:

:cheesy:

Yawn.

As for abdominal muscles, depends what i had for lunch........

I did it once for 3 days - ate in a HiSo seafood place in Pattaya.

Angled the TV so I could see it from the throne

555

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Posted (edited)
On 3/13/2019 at 10:25 AM, thaiguzzi said:

:cheesy:

Yawn.

You are preaching to the majority of riders on step thru scooters here.

The tank is under the seat........

 

As for abdominal muscles, depends what i had for lunch........

 

That's why I specifically referred to the OP. He specifically said he had a bike 300cc and over. Do you and your mate who doesn't like lubricating things ever get sick of just being wrong?

 

Go push your Guzzi or ride your Honda Beat somewhere else until you have something useful or at least correct to offer 55555

Edited by Farangwithaplan
typo
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1 hour ago, Farangwithaplan said:

That's why I specifically referred to the OP. He specifically said he had a bike 300cc and over. Do you and your mate who doesn't like lubricating things ever get sick of just being wrong?

 

Go push your Guzzi or ride your Honda Beat somewhere else until you have something useful or at least correct to offer 55555

To$$er.

And,

1. why do i have to push my Moto Guzzi?

2. I don't own or ride a Honda Beat.

  Get your facts straight before opening your orifice.

To$$er.

On 3/12/2019 at 5:27 PM, Farangwithaplan said:

I think that guy types in third person - He is referring to himself. His handle seems to give that away. Not judging, though... Sometimes I type with a lisp for amusement.

 

To the OP, there are a couple of good posts on the first page. A defensive line on Thai (or all roads in the world) is a good option. There are plenty of tracks to scrape a peg. The one on the way to Kaeng Krachan in Petburi is a gem for tyre shredding fun.

 

On roads, I use a defensive line as noted above and by a few other posters. It offers you safety and still allows you a lot of enjoyment with a 'slow in, fast out' style. For example on a right hand turn, set your entry speed, hold a steady throttle. If you are already familiar with trail braking, do so to keep the forks compressed and minimise the bike's rake. That will give you better turn in. You should have your legs gripping the tank to stablise yourself and have your abdominal muscles engaged. There should be minimal load on your wrists.

 

Be safely on the left side of the lane but stay out of the inevitable rubble you find on the road side. Turn decisively and with force by pushing your right bar forward. Make sure you body is in good position as are both your feet. Left foot heel jammed against the peg with thigh hugging the tank. Right foot on the ball of your feet. Reach your body out to kiss the right hand mirror. look through the corner at all times. Aim for your your run through the corner to get you nearer to the centre line on your side of the lane.

 

If you see a car coming, you can easily run wide safely to get clear road. If all clear you can be twisting on the gas harder as you stand the bike up more. Actually by adding more throttle it will force the bike to want to stand up. If you can't see through the corner, slow down before you enter.

 

Rinse and repeat with a grin from ear to ear.

 

There will be a million better examples of a defensive line han what I have written here. Do a search and read and practice, read and practice. Keep a racing line for race tracks or very open clear roads where you can see oncoming traffic. The only racetrack tricks I use on the road are trail braking the front and using the rear brake gently to assist turning the bars harder to tighten my cornering if I am making a defensive move away from a pothole or the like. I actually use my rear brake a lot for stability, not just for braking.

 

One thing I would say is never stay in the far left side for long. Debris always ends up there. That means screws, nails, bits of wire and glass. It increases your chance of punctures.

 

Other times I move to the right of the lane is when there is a T intersection or cross roads where someone can pull out in front of me. One example is when I want to stay a little closer to the left is when I'm cresting a blind hill. I don't want to be too far left because there is always the possibility of a bike or trike going in either direction, but I would never want to be near the centre line.

 

I'll position myself so I can see around a car in front of me. I usually keep an eye on the vehicle in front of the vehicle in front of me's brake lights. It gives me that little bit extra reaction time which I have noticed I am starting to need these days.

 

Road conditions and line of sight and oncoming traffic guide me in my road positions.

 

 

So how long did it take you to write this twaddle?

You are preaching to posters with a CB300-500.

Not an R1 M1.

On a race track.

Most people who already know all the above, and more, as 2nd nature, just get on a bike and, er ride.

And don't write a story.

Or state the bleedin' obvious.

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On 3/10/2019 at 3:49 PM, papa al said:

papa has been knocked over and injured by bikes 2x.

Knocked over by car 1x, but jumped clear safely.

Fell by self 100x.

5 5

 

Ahaha bloody banana peels everywhere, right !?

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On 3/12/2019 at 11:25 PM, thaiguzzi said:

:cheesy:

Yawn.

You are preaching to the majority of riders on step thru scooters here.

The tank is under the seat........

 

As for abdominal muscles, depends what i had for lunch........

 

My case of beer is in the step-thru and I grip it with my legs. 

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As mentioned by a few riders above I also claim the middle of the lane and always keep a clear view ahead, never settling in behind a wagon or van. 

Constantly having to concentrate takes some of the pleasure away from riding in Thailand but I can’t live without motorcycling.

A few weeks ago after no rain for weeks in Udon I was taking my girlfriend to work at 7.00 am, the roads were quiet but had been sprayed with water to keep the dust down. A car in front of me sped up to beat the red light and while turning right lost control taking out a guy on a scooter waiting on the opposite side of the road. The surface is like glass on this particular junction.

The worst I’ve experienced recently was riding pillion behind a big wagon pulling a trailer, there was a car between us and the wagon.

without warning a scooter came flying out from under the wagon hitting the car in front and we narrowly missed the mayhem.

My choice is always to pass and keep a clear view ahead. 

 

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