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Australia's ruling coalition loses 50th straight Newspoll

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Australia's ruling coalition loses 50th straight Newspoll

 

2019-03-11T033023Z_1_LYNXMPEF2A072_RTROPTP_4_AUSTRALIA-JAPAN.JPG

Australia's Prime Minister Scott Morrison speaks during the INPEX Gala Dinner in Darwin, Australia November 16, 2018. David Moir/Pool via REUTERS/Files

 

SYDNEY (Reuters) - Australia's conservative government is heading for defeat in a looming election, a widely watched opinion poll showed on Monday, after disappointing news on the economy tarnished the credibility of Prime Minister Scott Morrison.

 

Notching its 50th poll loss in a row, the Liberal-National coalition trailed the centre-left Labor Party by 54 percent to 46 percent on a two-party preferred basis.

 

The coalition trailed Labor by 53 percent to 47 percent in the previous Newspoll for The Australian newspaper. The results would give Labor a clear victory if the election were fought today. Time is short as the vote is expected some time in May.

 

The coalition's primary vote was on 36 percent, behind Labor on 39 percent. The poll of 1,610 people was conducted from March 7 to 10 and had a margin of error of 2.4 percentage points.

 

The result comes a week after government figures showed the Australian economy almost ground to a halt in the fourth quarter of last year, undermining the coalition's claim to being the party of better economic management.

 

The coalition has also been hit by a wave of high-profile retirements, with two senior ministers saying earlier this month they would not contest the election.

 

Morrison needs to retain all the parliamentary seats held by his coalition government, but his chances are weakened by a wave of incumbent lawmakers in marginal seats set to retire.

 

The government has its annual budget on April 2 and is expected to announce a return to surplus and likely some sort of tax cuts or spending promises to sweeten voters.

 

Monday's poll did show Morrison remained the preferred prime minister over Labor's Bill Shorten, with a share of 43 percent to 36 percent. Some 43 percent of voters approved of Morrison's performance, while 45 percent disapproved.

 

The findings come despite Morrison's attempt to cast the election as a referendum on border security and asylum seekers - hot-button topics in previous votes.

 

(Reporting by Wayne Cole; Editing by Peter Cooney)

 

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-- © Copyright Reuters 2019-0

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don't forget these are the same people who ran polls saying Hilary would win

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2 hours ago, Lucius verus said:

Whatever you're smoking I'll buy a kilo of it.   

ALP will borrow against our AAA rating, boost minimum wages which are already the highest in the world or close to it, open the floodgates for human traffickers ,make a lot of litigation lawyers rich and employ thousands of more incompetent women in the public service and uniform jobs. They will sue the crap out of the Aussie taxpayer for sex harrassment and stress related problems.

Australia is heading for bad times.

Shall we find you a safe space then?

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LNP have an identity problem. Their actions depicts them as a centre-left party whilst still trying to make us believe they are conservative.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, car720 said:

Here is the problem.

Voting is compulsory in Australia.

However, how can any man who calls himself honourable be forced to chose between two proven liars?

We have lived off the sheep's back for too long now.  It will all dry up one day and then Australia will go down the hole faster than a greasy turd.

Voting in Australia is NOT compulsory.

Turning up on election day and having your name crossed off the electoral  roll is!

You can make a dart out of it and toss it out the window if you want.

You don't have to vote, state or federal.

 

Edited by Lucius verus
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2 hours ago, car720 said:

Here is the problem.

Voting is compulsory in Australia.

However, how can any man who calls himself honourable be forced to chose between two proven liars?

We have lived off the sheep's back for too long now.  It will all dry up one day and then Australia will go down the hole faster than a greasy turd.

I agree with compulsory voting, so I do not agree it is the problem.

(you can always place your vote papers in the box without placing a mark on them)

 I have always tried to be centrist in my opinions. And with Abbot still pulling the strings,

Liberals are still a right wing party. Turnbull was a popular PM, but Abbott stooges knifed him.

And the constant parade of corrupt Lib pollies who got caught out but were never forced to admit or show remorse is almost a daily event.

Lastly, we have not lived off the the sheeps back since the early 60's. It is resources such as iron and coal.

Coal is passe for so many reasons. Iron has never been value added, it has just made a lot of very big holes in the Pilbara region of W.A.

 Either way, it is time to get rid of this tired, corrupt, elite and out of date party.

Making the rich richer and hoping for the trickle down effect was disproved decades ago. But the Libs persist with their cronies

in the banking and financial systems. Holding out against a royal commission which exposed total corruption with the Lib elite mates was the final straw.

And look at all the rats who are calling quits, and abandoning the party. Let the Libs sink down into the swamp they built. 

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Voters should remember that Tony Abbot's wrecking crew got in with no policies whatsoever other than dismantling whatever Labor had done, and despite the Australian economy being in good shape at the time. This time let us hope that the voting public is bright enough to ignore rhetoric and party loyalties, and focus on policies and demonstrated performance.

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The issue for me is the price of energy, or electricity specifically. That's not because I can't afford my electricity bills, but because the cost of energy, plus the efficient ways we use that energy, is the basis of our prosperity, on average. That's a fundamental of economics. Low cost energy plus high efficiency usage is the best scenario. High cost energy plus low efficiency usage, is the worst scenario.

 

Australia's electricity prices have more than doubled during the past decade, compared with the average rate of inflation. That's bound to have an economic impact on businesses. It's no wonder that the wages of the average worker are not rising in Australia. If a company has to pay significantly more for electricity, it's difficult for them to also pay more for the labour they employ.

 

The cause of this rise in electricity prices is of course due to the move towards expensive, unreliable, renewable energy supplies, and the refusal to build new coal-fired power stations, employing the latest emission controls, to replace the old power stations which have been closed down.

 

The current, Liberal government doesn't have the majority in the Senate to do what is required to reduce energy costs, and the majority of Australians don't have the nous to understand the economic problems related to high energy prices.

 

The economy at present is not too bad, but I suspect the Labour party will win the next election and drag the economy down into a disaster during the next one or two terms. Hopefully this will eventually result in a future win for the Liberals, with a big majority, so they can do what's required to get the economy back into good shape.

 

Just speculating. I hope I'm wrong. 😉

 

 

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