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BANGKOK 19 April 2019 21:49
glegolo

cement piles - distance and depth

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Posted (edited)

Hi, I like to have your opinion about a matter that is coming up just now with my wifes land.... First of all let me say that I am a far better guitarist than a handyman, så plse have patience with me.

 

Anyhow my wife she is having problem with neighbouring thai people who constantly are trying and squeese in and steal bit by bit of her land and they farm it without any hesitance. These guys they just do not care about honesty at all...

 

Wifey is now forced in a more proper and definitiv way to mark up her land to protect herself.... And this is when my question to you come in handy s.t.s. Let me ask you do you agree with me to overrule the cement (concrete-guys) they justlove to suggest hard to my wife that she needs 5 meters in between the cement piles???? In my amateur way I strongly feel that 10 meters (at least) is much better and of course half the price. And by wifes 784 meters length that need cementpiles it means for me economicly that I am going from suggested 158 piles down to 79 piles..  from 23.700 baht down to 11,850 baht (cost 150 baht/pcs... That is one question, do you guys agree with me or what???

 

The other thing that bothers me is that friends of me are claiming that I need to have barbed wire inbetween the piles... Otherwise they will soon "fall over".... I do argue that it depends on how deep I can plant these cement-piles...... Do any of you have any knowledge about these matters..????

 

F.y.i. I just hate the barbed wire.. I see it too much and I see it also in very civilised countries like the US, and I just feel it cripple the whole landscape...

 

Thanks for your input guys..

 

glegolo

Edited by glegolo

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Task A. Get a re-survey done by the land department to mark the correct perimeter.

 

Task B. Concrete in the re-positioned land markers.

 

Task C. Sort a solidly anchored fence.

 

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14 minutes ago, Crossy said:

Task A. Get a re-survey done by the land department to mark the correct perimeter.

Task B. Concrete in the re-positioned land markers.

Task C. Sort a solidly anchored fence.

 

Thank you so much for your input. Yes the Survey is scheduled next weekend, so that will be done... But can you be more specific what you are thinking for B) and C)  plse...

 

glegolo

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The surveyor will position numbered concrete boundary markers, these have a habit of wandering in the night. Attaching them to a 30cm cube of concrete tends to suppress their wanderlust. Make sure the neighbouring owners witness the survey to prevent arguments.  Get concrete in around the markers immediately.

 

As to fencing. Anything that's not at least semi-solid (such as chain link) is as porous as the Mexican border and the lines can, er, bend between the markers (space in Thailand isn't just curved, it's decidedly bent). Buy or borrow a laser level so you know you are plotting straight lines between markers.

 

Get some posts in and concreted, say 10m apart to start with and run some simple wire between them, that will at least suggest that you're serious about protecting your asset. 

 

 

 

Then you can think about a more permanent solution.

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I'll move this to Land Ownership.

 

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57 minutes ago, Crossy said:

The surveyor will position numbered concrete boundary markers, these have a habit of wandering in the night. Attaching them to a 30cm cube of concrete tends to suppress their wanderlust. Make sure the neighbouring owners witness the survey to prevent arguments.  Get concrete in around the markers immediately.

 

As to fencing. Anything that's not at least semi-solid (such as chain link) is as porous as the Mexican border and the lines can, er, bend between the markers (space in Thailand isn't just curved, it's decidedly bent). Buy or borrow a laser level so you know you are plotting straight lines between markers.

 

Get some posts in and concreted, say 10m apart to start with and run some simple wire between them, that will at least suggest that you're serious about protecting your asset. 

 

 

 

Then you can think about a more permanent solution.

I would suggest that you concreat in one of those concreate posts adjacent to the marker ...post at least 1M in the ground ...could attach to Crossy block...

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Posted (edited)
17 hours ago, glegolo said:

Anyhow my wife she is having problem with neighbouring thai people who constantly are trying and squeese in and steal bit by bit of her land and they farm it without any hesitance. These guys they just do not care about honesty at all...

My wifes sister had the same problem because the land wasn't used by her anymore.

Sister had the border land markers re-done, as said old ones disappeared, she then just put concrete posts about 50 metres apart, all posts and markers were concreted in.

 

She then measured the areas poached upon by 3 neighbours and sent them a bill. 😁

 

She now rents it to some farmer who uses it for growing rice. 

Edited by Kwasaki

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20 minutes ago, Kwasaki said:

My wifes sister had the same problem because the land wasn't used by her anymore.

Sister had the border land markers re-done, as said old ones disappeared, she then just put concrete posts about 50 metres apart, all posts and markers were concreted in.

 

She then measured the areas poached upon by 3 neighbours and sent them a bill. 😁

 

She now rents it to some farmer who uses it for growing rice. 

I love that sentence in dark black, hahahahah

well done

 

thanks for info

glegolo

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17 hours ago, Crossy said:

The surveyor will position numbered concrete boundary markers, these have a habit of wandering in the night. Attaching them to a 30cm cube of concrete tends to suppress their wanderlust. Make sure the neighbouring owners witness the survey to prevent arguments.  Get concrete in around the markers immediately.

 

As to fencing. Anything that's not at least semi-solid (such as chain link) is as porous as the Mexican border and the lines can, er, bend between the markers (space in Thailand isn't just curved, it's decidedly bent). Buy or borrow a laser level so you know you are plotting straight lines between markers.

 

Get some posts in and concreted, say 10m apart to start with and run some simple wire between them, that will at least suggest that you're serious about protecting your asset. 

 

 

 

Then you can think about a more permanent solution.

I had the following done after the land office came to measure, also hit them with some red paint for the tractor driver.

IMG_1259.JPG

P2240053.JPG

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