Jump to content
BANGKOK 25 May 2019 16:22
webfact

Chiang Mai has world’s worst air as fires continue to rage in the North

Recommended Posts

Chiang Mai has world’s worst air as fires continue to rage in the North

By The Nation

 

09f03df4011cb23ee9a6f21708e25ecd.jpeg

Phayao

 

Chiang Mai on Tuesday morning had the world’s worst air quality.
 

The northern tourist city, Thailand’s second city, was ranked the number 1 air-polluted city with a 209 air quality index score on airvisual.com, before the air then worsened to an AQI of 234 around noon.

 

8abf782aae12e70954b5f10ff7196421.jpeg

 

Meanwhile the Pollution Control Department (PCD) reported the average 24-hour level of PM2.5 dust particulates had reached dangerous heights in all nine northern provinces of the Kingdom.

 

The Thai safety limit for PM2.5 is 50 micrograms per cubic metre of air, while the safety limit for AQI is 100. 

 

According to the PCD report, the 24-hour average level PM2.5 at 9am ranged from 58mcg to 146mcg in the nine northern provinces.

 

The areas with beyond-safe PM2.5 levels included the tambons of Mae Pa (79mcg, with a 172 AQI) in Tak’s Mae Sot district; Nai Wiang (103mcg, with a 213 AQI) in Nan’s Muang district, and Huai Kon (91mcg, with a 201 AQI) in Chalerm Phra Kiat district; Ban Klang (114mcg, with a 224 AQI) in Lamphun’s Muang district; Wiang (71mcg, with a 152 AQI) in Chiang Rai’s Muang district and Wiang Phang Kham (146mcg, with a 256 AQI) in Mae Sai district; Na Chak (121mcg, with a 231 AQI) in Phrae’s Muang district; Jong Kham (87mcg, with a 192 AQI) in Mae Hong Son’s Muang district; and Ban Tom (70mcg, with a 149) in Phayao’s Muang district. 

 

Safe levels were also exceeded in tambons Phra Baht (105mcg, with a 205 AQI) in Muang district and Ban Dong (124mcg, with a 234 AQI); Sop Pad (82mcg, with a 180 AQI) and Mae Mo (121mcg, with a 231) in Mae Mo district of Lampang; and Chang Pheuk (105mcg, with a 215 AQI), Suthep (73mcg, with a 158 AQI) and Sri Phum (98mcg, with a 208 AQI) in Chiang Mai’s Muang district; and Chang Kherng (58mcg, with a 120 AQI) in Chiang Mai’s Mae Chaem district.

 

9a96544e73ae5a2ed761d185b69ec627.jpeg

 

Forest fires, which have erupted in many parts of the North, were largely blamed for the poor air pollution. The satellite image report on Monday showed that the nine northern provinces had a combined 126 hot spots, mostly in forestland. Nan had the highest number at 37 hot spots. The neighbouring countries of Myanmar and Laos had 345 hot spots and 1,345 hot spots respectively.

 

In Phayao’s Muang district, nearly 100 officials were dispatched on Monday evening to fight forest fires that had erupted since 7.45pm on the mountains behind Phayao University in Tambon Mae Ka. They managed to contain the fire for the most part by night’s end. The officials continued to fight fires in the area on Tuesday morning and said that the blazes had damaged hundreds of rai of forestland in the area.

 

Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/national/30365650

 

thenation_logo.jpg

-- © Copyright The Nation 2019-03-12
 
 
Screen Shot 2562-03-12 at 13.33.36.png
 
  • Haha 1
  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No1 and dont seem like anybody is going catch them soon bye far in the lead, well doneThailand

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

In Nimman area now there is a persistent burning smell. I'm wearing the mask in my place too.
Only the rain can save us.

Edited by masvil
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is this actually news in the media outlets for Thai national (not just local) news? It seems we are being left out on a limb.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

we need a 'girlie man' rationalization.   it only affects children.  no, that don't work.  what a sec,  what about the stuff that we can't see, smell or taste yet accounts for all our food (soy and corn go into animal feeds), our air, life and.... probably we believe now even accounts for why we left the trees 8 mya. 

the stuff we only have 60 years of related basic oceanographic data on to figure out how it might be connected to the monsoon cycle that makes Thailand at all livable. 

there we go.  it's also exactly what every commercial airline passenger emits, to "travel" for essential activities.... per kilometer (each one).... times 285 grams and some of which persists for more than 100 years.... but we can't see it, smell it and it won't make us cough until.... it's a full blown EN and not just barely about neutral as it is in early March 2019 right now.  but it makes the world's economy go by, such as fo0lks who own golf resorts and fancy hotels (the Trumps).  according to what we can easily find on Google Scholar.  so be thankful!  it could (I'm a very optimistic kind of guy) be a heck of a lot worse.  

Edited by WeekendRaider
  • Like 2
  • Confused 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...