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BANGKOK 21 April 2019 10:00
biplanebluey

"no brakes"accidents in Thailand

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21 hours ago, biplanebluey said:

caused by brake failure

I think it's a matter of brake pads. 

I've been told they use old rubber  shoe soles.

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There is air over hydraulic used in old trucks. 

I had a 1910A International that worked that way.

Run out of air and you essentially run out of brakes. 

Just saying......... as many trucks/busses I see in Thailand are older than old.

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8 hours ago, taichiplanet said:

It seems most Thai drivers expect the brakes to work the same at 10 kph as it does at 100 kph, hence the 'brakes fail'.

 

It is inexperience with handling speed properly, mixed with stupidity. Any idiot can drive fast, it is when there is an emergency that tells the most about someones anticipation and skill.

 

Exactly ! So funny to see these idiots racing in their trucks when they do not even have half a brain to be able to understand that they $hit trucks won't brake as my AMG. I can speed because I can bake, but they cannot...

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, thailand49 said:

no random drug and alcohol testing

Nor is there in N. America

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5 minutes ago, myshem said:

 

Exactly ! So funny to see these idiots racing in their trucks when they do not even have half a brain to be able to understand that they $hit trucks won't brake as my AMG. I can speed because I can bake, but they cannot...

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hmmm, you are a baker to be avoided then....:whistling:

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1 hour ago, thailand49 said:

nor are they required to take a real physical to drive commercially!

Ever been in the DLT ? I assume by your post ... NOT

Commercial license valid for 3 years, and a road test is FOR SURE required.

Same Same as the West - some are good ... some are not

Look at Mon Transport - they haul fuel. Trucks in tip top shape.

The test I take every 3 years in N. America is very basic - like here. BP, heart, vision. Asked by Doc - you OK - I say yes.

Stamp. Bang. Done.

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Lack of training, it takes a lot of common sence to stop 30.000 kg in a straight line, end of post !!!

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I haven't sat in a cab with a Thai heavy vehicle driver (so grain of salt with my musings plz) on possible reasons for so many heavy vehicle crashes.

I drove for about 15 years; 8 to 18 tonne trucks in Oz, sometimes with dog trailers.

From some of the Thai crashes I've seen on youtube via TF some look very much like totally wrong gear being selected for road conditions, gradient, as well as excessive speed, and lack of anticipation of possible dangers ahead. 

The wrong gear often exacerbates and correlates with excessive speed as gearing is used in heavy vehicles along with engine brakes to keep the truck within control.

This poor gear selection leads a driver to lean on the brakes more. This likely over braking or 'brake on brake off' on gradients leaves you with no brakes very quickly, then then horror of too much speed to be able to shift down, and thus more speed. 

If your loosing control of the vehicle and are poorly trained then panic and trying to ride the vehicle into a safer mode can often be what poor or inexperienced drivers do, in the hope they can regain airbrake pressure and slow the truck then shift down and get control back.. Sadly this relies of the road staying straight, no obstacles, plenty of room, and no down gradient!

The tipping over of heavy vehicles is an interesting happening too; Seems from observing, video evidence (post-crash position) may also be contributed to by; Vehicles often being overloaded, incorrect type of vehicle being used to haul the load, loads not being tied down correctly and shifting under centrifugal force during swerving or turning (again in wrong gear, driving too close, and too fast to anticipate and avoid obstacles in front) e.g Todays buffalo horror the cane truck crushing a car and some folks recently.

Add to this other road users behaving spontaneously, without using mirrors to check if stopping of doing whatever they choose to do is safe, braking, turning, and stopping without sufficient warning to others, no indicating, and disobeying both road laws and common sense actions and its a clusterf..k! 

It does not take much to tip/or loose control of a truck if your combining wrong gear, too much speed, poor road awareness (i.e. not looking down the road far enough while maintaining good attentive peripheral vision so as to judge traffic and centrifugal forces when cornering,

Perhaps less than well maintained vehicles, and fatigue are real contributor too. 
Perhaps more stringent compulsory instruction and govt licensing testing would help somewhat in the appalling carnage on Thai roads.

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DOT 3 and 4 are fine, can even be mixed, though not recommended - DOT 5 is the latest. I imagine that the type of brake fluid has very little to do with brake fail accidents in Thailand - More than likely just poor maintenance or heaven forbid, lies and trying to blame the vehicle rather than the driver!

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23 hours ago, canthai55 said:

Large trucks and buses have air brakes. No brake fluid.

Exact but the assitance is an oil one on traditional brakes.

 

For many years heavy goods vehicles and coaches in Europe have disc brakes on all wheels with ABS and EBD;
some high-end road tractors and coaches have carbon / ceramic brakes as in the case of F1

The brakes of heavy goods vehicles and coaches cannot, as a matter of principle, not work;
if there is no more air, they block because they work at a depression;
and on disc brakes, it's not air but oil.
The problem of Thailand is the lack of professional training and total ignorance of how a motor / box / bridge unit works;
I own  an Isuzu pickup with automatic gearbox;
when I ride in the mountains, I use my gearbox as a manual gearbox and almost never touch the brake pedal.

 

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20 hours ago, JAS21 said:

Isn't the 'failure' of the brakes when going down hill caused by the air compressor being unable to keep up with the usage of air and then no brakes? Well I thought that is what happens if air brakes are used too much.

its the reverse, air pressure releases brakes,

no air=brakes on

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Posted (edited)
17 minutes ago, brokenbone said:

its the reverse, air pressure releases brakes,

no air=brakes on

Are you up to speed on this ... see #8 ... TIT ...

Edited by JAS21

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Posted (edited)
12 minutes ago, JAS21 said:

Are you up to speed on this ... see #8 ... TIT ...

oh, wow, i just assumed it to be world wide standard for

heavy machinery, for the past 50+ years.

actually do thais even build big machinery

them self a unique model ?

 

maybe modified nid noi on old junk they cant find spares for ?

Edited by brokenbone

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I just assume they always spell "brane" incorrectly...

 

Actually, Thai's seem to prefer to swerve to avoid something rather than to "emergency brake", and if they then brake hard whilst swerving, this is when they totally lose control. 

 

I tried to teach my gf to "emergency brake"...as hard as possible (with ABS) in a straight line - she didn't have a clue, and just would calmly coast to a stop...!!!!

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