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Worker, 25, electrocuted by high-voltage cable

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Worker, 25, electrocuted by high-voltage cable

By Eakkapop Thongtub

 

1552759972_1-org.jpg

Cable worker Pakasit Raksakam was fitting a cable when he reached out and accidentally touched another cable that still had live current running through it. Photo: Chalong Municipality
 

PHUKET: A 25-year-old worker died after he accidentally touched a high-voltage power cable still connected to the power pole where he was working in Chalong early yesterday afternoon (Mar 16).

 

Emergency responders arrived at the scene, on Soi Na Yai off Chao Fah West Rd, soon after being notified of the incident at 2pm to find co-workers attempting to revive Pakasit “Benz” Raksakam.

 

Rescue workers rushed Mr Pakasit to the Accident & Emergency Centre of the yet-to-open Chalong Hospital, but he was pronounced dead.


Full story: https://www.thephuketnews.com/worker-25-electrocuted-by-high-voltage-cable-70742.php#GhqJkux1fPY6JZSU.97

 

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-- © Copyright Phuket News 2019-03-17

 

 

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RIP, safety last is the order of the day.

 

Follow up act one with a visit to a hospital that is yet to open.

 

 

 

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i'd hate to be his replacement of the day

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A simple and inexpensive precaution when working near or around high powered electrical lines:

  • The rubber blanket helps reduce accidental exposure to energized power lines, conductors and hardware. The flexibility to wrap, fold and maneuver the rubber blanket also allows such equipment as underground transformers and switchgear to be easily covered thus allowing adequate protection for the worker.
  • B1.JPG.39f03246ac724f1e4971ffadf5b984dc.JPG

https://www.utilityproducts.com/articles/print/volume-5/issue-2/product-focus/readers-choice-awards/rubber-blankets-save-lives.html

But it requires someone to place value on a human life.

 

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Lets start a Gofundme...serious.  So sad for him!  RIP.

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1 hour ago, Aussieroaming said:

Follow up act one with a visit to a hospital that is yet to open.

The separate accident and emergency section of the hospital has been open and saving lives for more than a year.

I don't know why this news outlet continues to refer to it in this way. It's possible someone in a life threatening situation might bypass the hospital because of this inaccurate description.  

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A simple and inexpensive precaution when working near or around high powered electrical lines:
  • The rubber blanket helps reduce accidental exposure to energized power lines, conductors and hardware. The flexibility to wrap, fold and maneuver the rubber blanket also allows such equipment as underground transformers and switchgear to be easily covered thus allowing adequate protection for the worker.
  • B1.JPG.39f03246ac724f1e4971ffadf5b984dc.JPG
https://www.utilityproducts.com/articles/print/volume-5/issue-2/product-focus/readers-choice-awards/rubber-blankets-save-lives.html
But it requires someone to place value on a human life.
 

Don’t the majority of accident investigations result in cause and prevention measures? After the accident?


Sent from my iPhone using Thailand Forum - Thaivisa mobile app

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2 hours ago, Srikcir said:

A simple and inexpensive precaution when working near or around high powered electrical lines:

  • The rubber blanket helps reduce accidental exposure to energized power lines, conductors and hardware. The flexibility to wrap, fold and maneuver the rubber blanket also allows such equipment as underground transformers and switchgear to be easily covered thus allowing adequate protection for the worker.
  • B1.JPG.39f03246ac724f1e4971ffadf5b984dc.JPG

https://www.utilityproducts.com/articles/print/volume-5/issue-2/product-focus/readers-choice-awards/rubber-blankets-save-lives.html

But it requires someone to place value on a human life.

 

in Thailand  think tey only dream of things like this 

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1 hour ago, mikecha said:

in Thailand  think tey only dream of things like this 

That stuff costs money, workers are cheap, do the math, very sad, RIP.

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4 hours ago, Old Croc said:

The separate accident and emergency section of the hospital has been open and saving lives for more than a year.

I don't know why this news outlet continues to refer to it in this way. It's possible someone in a life threatening situation might bypass the hospital because of this inaccurate description.  

Thanks for the clarification, yes confusing reporting for those unaware.

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Electricity, its nice having it working for you

but if you have to work with it be seriously careful

Just one tiny mistake ...

Just 25 yo , RIP.

Time for labour inspection and guess for making rules about working safely as possible with electricity.

As some already said, what is the price of a humans life.

Was he wrong not doing right procedure or is it the company neglecting?

Sad, take care with electricity !!

You also see in Thailand the scaffolds, bamboo, they are real strong. But you ever saw the guys working on it?

Just a frame on which they stand, holding with one arm and the other arm works. OR if needed two arms  

the you balance !! Incredible.

 

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12 hours ago, rooster59 said:

Rescue workers rushed Mr Pakasit to the Accident & Emergency Centre of the yet-to-open Chalong Hospital, but he was pronounced dead.

 

Not surprised that he was dead if they were high-voltage overhead lines because very rarely do people survive that sort of voltage flowing through them – – anywhere from 4.4 KV up to 11 to 33 KV and even higher in some instances, but not wholly aware of actual voltages here in Thailand.

 

I have worked on high-voltage overhead lines when they were still alive, and I was absolutely terrified despite working out of a fibreglass cherry-picker bucket with all the other safety features in place, because you can still feel a "tingle" despite all of the insulation.

 

Don't think this poor guy stood a chance. RIP poor fella.

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Because there are no trade unions fighting for worker’s rights, there has never been a movement to form a Health and Safety Executive in Thailand.

 

Employers don’t care as they never get sued and only have to pay a few baht, if anything, to the family the worker was supporting.

 

No push from the Government as these are only poor people who don’t count.

 

I wish someone could prove me wrong.

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