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BANGKOK 19 May 2019 20:04
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May seeks Brexit delay after third vote on her deal is derailed

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1 hour ago, Thingamabob said:

If there is another vote on this it should be between, on the one hand, 'May's Deal' or. on the other hand, 'No Deal'.

 

'Remain' already eliminated in the earlier referendum.

 

 

Let me sell you a car. I promise you a Ferrari for the price of a Honda. What you get is a broken toy car. When you want to return it, I’m telling you you can’t:

 

“You wanted a car, you got a car. Car means car. All that ‘toy car’ vs. ‘real car’ nonsense is something you only started after you signed the contract. Don’t tell me you didn’t know it; your friend told you I’m a crook. And don’t say our contract is not-binding; your friend told you I wouldn’t give a damn. 

 

But fine, I’m a generous person. You can choose again. Choose between the broken toy car and a bobby car. Canceling the whole is thing is not an option, that you eliminated already.”

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1 hour ago, Srikcir said:

It should have not been a surprise to anyone who knew the rules, especially the PM!

In fact the Speaker did not really intervene.

He quite politely informed the PM that the motion to vote a third time on the same Brexit deal must first get the Speaker's approval. And he gave advance notice that the deal must be substantially different from the Deal that had been previously voted on by parliament. If May presents the same Deal to the Speaker for approval, THEN he will intervene by denying it for a vote. 

The issue was raised last October in a Brexit committee .

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5 hours ago, SheungWan said:

We could make up a similar bogus list for 5-10.

 

5 hours ago, vogie said:

Go for it.

Every single point in that bogus list would rest on the Hard Brexit bogus lie that the result of the referendum demands no-deal only.

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25 minutes ago, tomacht8 said:

The main problem of Brexit is its legal, economic and political complexity that would be underestimated by all Pro Brexit politicians. Not one of the UK politicians of the UK Parliament has comprehensive and detailed knowledge of all EU laws.

It was nice to look over the 3 years that almost every week a new problem area was added. Instead of wanting a completely chaotic Brexit with the crowbar, it would be much smarter to plan the exit properly in all details. Good things need their time. The Channel Tunnel has also not been built in one day. The UK should withdraw Art. 50 and start planning a reasonable Brexit for all concerned.

All fine and good but in reality the project broke down in the face of an unanticipated border issue to the West. Behind You! as the Xmas panto procedes on stage in Act 2. The Hard Brexiteer project cannot deliver.

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6 hours ago, quandow said:

I don't get it. Didn't the citizens vote FOR Brexit? If the vote passed but the politicians don't honor the decision made by the people, then why bother having voted in the first place?

Brexit passed with a very small majority. The politicians did in fact 'honor the decision' as May has in fact negotiated a deal BUT the leavers who were promised all sorts of wonderful but ultimately unachievable things don't like the deal. To be fair, no one likes the deal but that's what the Remain camp have been saying all along i.e. there was never going to be a great deal got from the EU. So we are now left with the options; take May's deal, get more concessions from the EU or implement a No-Deal scenario; one which everyone agrees would be a complete disaster. 

They now have 9 days to do one of them, hence why it's highly likely there will be a delay. 

 

 

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Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, samran said:

They were also told that a new trade agreement with the EU would be one of the easiest things in the world to negotiate. 

Which is why it's so 'odd' that uk politicians agreed with the eu agenda - trade deals at the bottom of the list....

 

The same applies to the eu/may 'deal'!

Edited by dick dasterdly
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1 minute ago, vogie said:

Oh yes they can.

I think he was referring to delivering something more substantial than castles in the sky built on a foundation of lies and lack of knowledge. 

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1 minute ago, dick dasterdly said:

Which is why it's so 'odd' that uk politicians agreed with eu politicians agreed with the eu agenda - trade deals at the bottom of the list....

 

The same applies to the eu/may 'deal'!

It’s actually not at all. Obviously you want to get the Day-1 right first before talking about the future. 

 

It amazes me how literally every mom-and-pop shop who has ever done an acquisition knows all that but the sixth largest economy of the world apparently doesn’t. And apparently doesn’t even have advisors telling them; again something that every mom-and-pop shop does. 

 

When companies buy businesses from other companies, they spent a huge amount of time and effort on understanding beforehand to what extent there are dependencies. Can all licenses be transferred or do I risk losing access to te IT system? Does the whole thing come with the relevant key people or do I risk losing that knowledge and having to build all that myself? Will all the processes work after separating them from their parent or do I risk disruption to the business on Day-1?

 

All these considerations are factored into the negotiation. Quite commonly, a transition period will be negotiated in which the parent company will continue to provide all sorts of services using their systems, people and agreements, all to ensure minimal disruption to the business. Those transition periods can last up to several years and the selling company is being paid for it. A huge amount of time is spent on properly planning how things will work on Day-1, before thinking about a future state. 

 

I have yet to meet a CEO who, when about to acquiring a business from another company, says: “Nah, fxxx it. I don’t care about transition services and business continuity on Day-1. Disruptions to my supply chain? Losing key customers, suppliers or people? I don’t care. We’ve made that great hair blower fifty years ago, we will can build things up again.” Amazingly a huge economy is doing the exact opposite, and some people seem to be supporting that. 

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16 minutes ago, dick dasterdly said:

And we still don't "know" - we only have biased 'opinions' and biased 'forecasts'.

 

It's impossible to know unless it actually happens.

lol
Brexit as a surprise bag.
A children's chocolate surprise egg.
A lottery.
A surprise menu.
An adventure game paw.
Very funny idea.

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38 minutes ago, dick dasterdly said:

Not true at all.

I agree that EVERYONE thought that trade deals would be at the top of the negotiating agenda, and as 'no deal' would be bad for both sides - they would actually negotiate sensibly!

They didn't (for some obscure reason 🤣 ).  Instead, the uk side just agreed with the eu agenda whilst pontificating about "no deal better than a bad deal" etc. etc.

And we were 'fooled again' into doing our best to believe this rhetoric......

Putting "everyone' into upper case is so convincing.

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