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BANGKOK 19 April 2019 17:58
Speedo1968

Stroppy - Would you use this word in Thai about a child ?

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If a child behaves in this way - stroppy - what word would be the 'polite' form to use ?

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Not sure. doo (naughty) doesn't really cover it, are you thinking in relation to a spoilt older child or just a bratty younger child? Hopefully over on the language subforum many can help.

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bring back the strop i say

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I don't think there is a word for it.

 

I asked my wife, who having grown up in the US as kid understands the word, doesn't think it exists in Thai. 

'naughty' is as close as it gets 

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On 3/29/2019 at 7:00 PM, GinBoy2 said:

I don't think there is a word for it.

 

I asked my wife, who having grown up in the US as kid understands the word, doesn't think it exists in Thai. 

'naughty' is as close as it gets 

Thanks for the reply Ginboy2, guess its one of these words that is only understood by those that know it or use it.   

 

I think 'stroppy' is an English word and possibly, it seems, dates back to the early 1950's.  I certainly remember it from growing up in London in the 1950's.

 

Could perhaps be a shortened and altered form of the word obstreperous,  

Bolshy is another word but I would consider this to be more relevant to someone in their late teens or 20's.

 

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What age group child were you thinking of?

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Posted (edited)
13 hours ago, Speedo1968 said:

Thanks for the reply Ginboy2, guess its one of these words that is only understood by those that know it or use it.   

 

I think 'stroppy' is an English word and possibly, it seems, dates back to the early 1950's.  I certainly remember it from growing up in London in the 1950's.

 

Could perhaps be a shortened and altered form of the word obstreperous,  

Bolshy is another word but I would consider this to be more relevant to someone in their late teens or 20's.

 

We use stroppy in American English too.

 

Bolshy, that's a new one for my lexicon!

 

I'm making the leap it is derived from Bolsivich?

Which I may have spelt incorrectly LOL

Edited by GinBoy2

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19 hours ago, katana said:

What age group child were you thinking of?

 

Not my child but have known her since she was 3.

Age 7 female - has family issues - is bright - often put down by her mother.

Child very bright but will move to 'local' school.

The child is obviously trying to protect herself but stroppiness has got to the point of being rude.

Another relative understands the child but can say nothing and neither will I.

My question is really just a question as to what would be said here.

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10 hours ago, GinBoy2 said:

We use stroppy in American English too.

 

Bolshy, that's a new one for my lexicon!

 

I'm making the leap it is derived from Bolsivich?

Which I may have spelt incorrectly LOL

Yes Ginboy2 quite right, derived from Bolshevik sometime in the early 20th century.

Basically means a revolutionary behaviour - guess we have all been there at some stage in our lives.

 

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23 hours ago, Speedo1968 said:

 

Could perhaps be a shortened and altered form of the word obstreperous,  

 

 

You sound like a clever guy. Any solutions for Brexit while your at it? 

  • Haha 1

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Posted (edited)

Belligerent ?

Edited by NE1

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Posted (edited)
51 minutes ago, Speedo1968 said:

 

Not my child but have known her since she was 3.

Age 7 female - has family issues - is bright - often put down by her mother.

Child very bright but will move to 'local' school.

The child is obviously trying to protect herself but stroppiness has got to the point of being rude.

Another relative understands the child but can say nothing and neither will I.

My question is really just a question as to what would be said here.

I see.

The link below has several Thai words used in relation to irritable babies and how parents should deal with it, but I'm not sure how suitable they are for a 7 year-old. Maybe some of them carry over.
eg
หงุดหงิด - touchy, grouchy, irritable, moody, testy, cranky
โมโหร้าย - violent tempered
เจ้าอารมณ์ - temperamental, emotional, testy
ขี้วีน - prone to fly off the handle at someone

https://th.theasianparent.com/ลูกขี้หงุดหงิด

Edited by katana

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23 hours ago, katana said:

I see.

The link below has several Thai words used in relation to irritable babies and how parents should deal with it, but I'm not sure how suitable they are for a 7 year-old. Maybe some of them carry over.
eg
หงุดหงิด - touchy, grouchy, irritable, moody, testy, cranky
โมโหร้าย - violent tempered
เจ้าอารมณ์ - temperamental, emotional, testy
ขี้วีน - prone to fly off the handle at someone

https://th.theasianparent.com/ลูกขี้หงุดหงิด

Many thanks katana.

I think 'testy' is the nearest I would use, not sure how well understood it would be.


Have taught a number of children m/f here with ADHD'S ( the girl in question does not have it ), the affected have always been boys, any sister in the family would generally seem to show protective reflexes by way of body language rather than verbal; these actions would in some cases almost mimic the condition itself.

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On 4/3/2019 at 7:25 PM, RickG16 said:

You sound like a clever guy. Any solutions for Brexit while your at it? 

Not sure if I would be allowed to utter suitable enough words on this site !

"Let them eat cake" would/ could possibly apply to ALL involved with this fiasco.

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It depends on the specific behavior. If her parents say, "Go to school!" and she replies, "I don't want to go to school!" then she's being stubborn-- ดื้อ.

 

But if she replies, "<deleted> off, you fat, old bastard!" then I guess an apt description would be ปากร้าย ไม่เคารพผู้ใหญ่-- foul-mouthed and disrespectful of her elders.

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