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BANGKOK 22 May 2019 06:19
NanLaew

Acer running 8.1 - options to upgrade to 10 ?

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The oldest unmarried niece has asked if I can make her Acer Aspire E14 laptop go faster. I had a quick look and saw the usual clutter of browser add-ons and shonky Chinese AV stuff and thinking it was W10, gave her the quickest option of a clean reinstall which she says is fine.

 

However, I find that it's running a non-activated 8.1 instead.

 

What's the quickest/easiest and most economical get around here? Do I need to activate the 8.1 and take it from there? How quick and easy (and economical) is the subsequent leap to 10? Is 8.1 really rubbish? I only ever used it once on a laptop provided by a client back in 2015 and after a couple of days, reverted to using a alternative W7 machine.

 

I checked the Acer website and all the 8.1/64 and 10/64 drivers are there since the laptop isn't that old. It has a 500Gb HDD and there's oodles of space on both the o/s and D partitions so just need to get the garbage out first.

 

While you are pondering how I should proceed, I will go ahead and purge it of these browser add-ons she seems to have acquired and the general forensics and housecleaning.

 

Thanks!

NL

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Just buy a cheap win 10 key from eebay and do a fresh 1809 install.

 

 

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8.1 is not so bad. I still use it on one PC because I am too lazy to update it. And it works just fine.

 

If you want to make it faster check if it is 32bit or 64bit Windows. If it's 64bit then check if you have more than 4GB RAM. In most scenarios 8GB should be enough but 4 is often not enough.

32bit Windows does not support more than 4GB so an update is useless if you don't change Windows to 64bit.

 

You also might think about replacing the HDD with a SSD. That will make the PC a lot faster without doing anything else.

You have to clone the old HDD to a new SSD. If you don't know how to do that ask in a shop. They will likely do it for you if you buy a new SSD.

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Cheap W10 keys online noted. Read all the other threads on that over the past few months so there should be no surprises there. As mentioned, the Acer support site has the full suite of drivers for all the 8 ands 10 varieties.

 

It is 64-bit with 4Gb RAM so all good there. Not sure if it will warrant an extra 4Gb even if supported.

 

I have a couple of SSD's kicking about from other laptop clones + the software and cables so that may be another DIY option and guaranteed to make an impression.

 

She's obviously used to W8.1 by now so after the cleanup and declutter, we'll see if it's fast enough.

 

Thanks for the tips.

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2 hours ago, NanLaew said:

It is 64-bit with 4Gb RAM so all good there. Not sure if it will warrant an extra 4Gb even if supported.

It's easy to check if you have enough RAM for whatever you are doing.

Open the Task Manager and go to the performance tab. You will see the used RAM.

Then open a few programs which you or she would normally open. The more programs you open at the same time the more RAM will be used. It you are already at the 4GB limit after opening i.e. 5 windows but you want to open 10 windows then better get extra RAM. It will make a big difference.

If you never use more than 4GB then more RAM won't make it faster.

 

The SSD will make it faster in any case.

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If it was sold with 8.1 pre-installed, the upgrade is free. 

But whatever you do, you should swap the HDD for an SSD. Since they cost as little as 700 baht, there is no reason not to do so.

I certainly would not clone the contents of the old HDD to an SSD. Clean install all the way.

 

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On 3/23/2019 at 5:42 AM, KneeDeep said:

If it was sold with 8.1 pre-installed, the upgrade is free. 

But whatever you do, you should swap the HDD for an SSD. Since they cost as little as 700 baht, there is no reason not to do so.

I certainly would not clone the contents of the old HDD to an SSD. Clean install all the way.

 

 

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On ‎3‎/‎22‎/‎2019 at 10:55 AM, shady86 said:

Just buy a cheap win 10 key from eebay and do a fresh 1809 install.

 

 

I recently bought a 2 or 3 year old 2nd hand Asus computer for my daughter which came with Windows 8.1. Messages came that Windows would expire in April 2019, so I decided to replace/upgrade the 8.1. A company called Enterprise on Lazada sells the Windows 10 Pro key for about B100 + shipping. I ordered 2 keys and shipping was free -- B170 total for 2 keys. Can't get much cheaper than that!. I installed the 1st key on the computer with Windows 8.1. It took more than 1 hour to download Windows 10 Pro from the Store, but inputting the key was flawless, accepted by Microsoft without issue. I installed the second key on my other daughter's computer, also Asus, that had an unregistered clone copy of Windows 10 Pro. When I tried to register the key I got a message that this key had already been installed on another computer. I sent a screenshot of the message from Microsoft to Enterprise on Line, and they sent me a new key in 10 minutes. The second key was accepted without issues. That was 3 weeks ago. I got a message on Line over the weekend from Enterprise asking if my key and the Windows 10 Pro was working properly -- nice follow up by them. I highly recommend Enterprise for Windows keys. It just cannot get much easier and cheaper to get real/original installation keys for Microsoft products that this. FP 

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On 3/23/2019 at 9:42 AM, KneeDeep said:

If it was sold with 8.1 pre-installed, the upgrade is free. 

But whatever you do, you should swap the HDD for an SSD. Since they cost as little as 700 baht, there is no reason not to do so.

I certainly would not clone the contents of the old HDD to an SSD. Clean install all the way.

In that scenario, will Microsoft regard it as an "upgrade" and therefore free? As I understand it their upgrade routine checks that Windows is already installed - if you replace the disk it won't be, and I'm not sure that model can fit two hard drives at once.  The upgrade routines often check that the hardware is essentially the same, and a hard disk replacement may not cut it.  As Fat Prophet says, a call to Microsoft is probably the least you can expect

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2 hours ago, ThaiBunny said:

In that scenario, will Microsoft regard it as an "upgrade" and therefore free? As I understand it their upgrade routine checks that Windows is already installed - if you replace the disk it won't be, and I'm not sure that model can fit two hard drives at once.  The upgrade routines often check that the hardware is essentially the same, and a hard disk replacement may not cut it.  As Fat Prophet says, a call to Microsoft is probably the least you can expect

New license is like $4 dollars.  

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3 hours ago, ThaiBunny said:

In that scenario, will Microsoft regard it as an "upgrade" and therefore free? As I understand it their upgrade routine checks that Windows is already installed - if you replace the disk it won't be, and I'm not sure that model can fit two hard drives at once.  The upgrade routines often check that the hardware is essentially the same, and a hard disk replacement may not cut it.  As Fat Prophet says, a call to Microsoft is probably the least you can expect

I always recommend that everyone have an external drive to use for backups.  The most flexible arrangement is to have a hard drive dock that can be used to convert almost any internal hard drive to a USB/eSATA/Thunderbolt connected external drive.

 

With an external drive the OP could replace the internal drive with an SSD, insert the old internal drive in the dock and then boot from it.  Then he could install the upgrade onto the clean internal SSD.  After completing the install copy over any applications and data files.  Test the new installation before you reformat the old hard drive and use it as a backup.

 

MSoft has a web page that may help --> LINK

 

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Posted (edited)
40 minutes ago, gamb00ler said:

With an external drive the OP could replace the internal drive with an SSD, insert the old internal drive in the dock and then boot from it.  Then he could install the upgrade onto the clean internal SSD.  After completing the install copy over any applications and data files.  Test the new installation before you reformat the old hard drive and use it as a backup.

In the above scenario, you would need to name the 3rd party software you would recommend for the transfer of applications. You can't just copy applications from a backup onto a new install and expect them to work. The application, unless self contained, is registered in too many places on the backup.

 

Yes it can be done, but not by copy & paste.

Edited by chrisinth
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Posted (edited)
4 minutes ago, chrisinth said:

In the above scenario, you would need to name the 3rd party software you would recommend for the transfer of applications. You can't just copy applications from a backup onto a new install and expect them to work. The application, unless self contained, is registered in too many places on the backup.

I use PC Mover but there are others I believe.  Not sure what's available however for those who want to do it for free

Edited by ThaiBunny

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Posted (edited)
25 minutes ago, ThaiBunny said:

I use PC Mover but there are others I believe.  Not sure what's available however for those who want to do it for free

Yep, there are a few out there. I use EaseUS Todo PCTrans. I have a Pro version, but there is also a free version. The free version is restricted to moving 2 applications according to below, but I am not sure if this is per task. I can't see the program being voided after one transfer though. Even if it was, uninstall with a dedicated uninstall program (remove all registry entries and records of initial install) and reinstall it once more should work if you don't want to pay for the pro or tech versions.

 

1471230373_24-Mar-1913-15-51.jpg.76ddf37562027f4f6d895ecaff909733.jpg

 

Note that you will still need the original keys for some software, some will retain registry activation information. So basically if you still have the software install packages and keys, it is probably easier to just do a new install anyway unless it is specialized software you are transferring.

Edited by chrisinth

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5 hours ago, ThaiBunny said:

In that scenario, will Microsoft regard it as an "upgrade" and therefore free? As I understand it their upgrade routine checks that Windows is already installed - if you replace the disk it won't be, and I'm not sure that model can fit two hard drives at once.  The upgrade routines often check that the hardware is essentially the same, and a hard disk replacement may not cut it.  As Fat Prophet says, a call to Microsoft is probably the least you can expect

 

??

You are quite wrong about the process. It's not as unsophisticated as you seem to image.

Call from Microsoft?? What are you thinking?

 

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