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BANGKOK 22 May 2019 05:35
webfact

Despite report findings, almost half of Americans think Trump colluded with Russia: Reuters/Ipsos poll

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Despite report findings, almost half of Americans think Trump colluded with Russia: Reuters/Ipsos poll

By Chris Kahn

 

2019-03-26T220101Z_1_LYNXNPEF2P1ZI_RTROPTP_4_USA-TRUMP-CONGRESS.JPG

U.S. President Donald Trump listens to questions from reporters as the president arrives for a closed Senate Republican policy lunch on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., March 26, 2019. REUTERS/Leah Millis

 

NEW YORK (Reuters) - Nearly half of all Americans still believe President Donald Trump worked with Russia to interfere in the 2016 presidential election, according to a new Reuters/Ipsos poll conducted after Special Counsel Robert Mueller cleared Trump of that allegation.

 

Americans did feel slightly more positive about Trump after learning the findings of the 22-month investigation into Russian meddling in the election, the national opinion poll released on Tuesday showed.

 

But U.S. Attorney General William Barr's four-page summary of Mueller’s investigation did little to change public opinion about the president’s alleged ties to Russia or quench the public’s appetite to learn more.

 

According to Barr's summary released on Sunday, Mueller found no evidence that the Trump campaign conspired with Russia in the 2016 election, but did not exonerate the president on the question of obstructing the investigation.

 

When asked specifically about accusations of collusion and obstruction of justice, 48 percent of poll respondents said they believed “Trump or someone from his campaign worked with Russia to influence the 2016 election,” down 6 percentage points from last week.

 

Fifty-three percent said “Trump tried to stop investigations into Russian influence on his administration,” down 2 points from last week.

 

Public opinion was split sharply along party lines, with Democrats much more likely than Republicans to believe that Trump colluded with Russia and obstructed justice.

 

The Reuters/Ipsos poll measured the public reaction in the United States on Monday and Tuesday, after the report summary was released, gathering online responses from 1,003 adults, including 948 who said they had at least heard of the summary findings.

 

The poll has a credibility interval, a measure of its precision, of about 4 percentage points.

 

Trump's approval rating got a slight boost, with 43 percent of Americans saying they approved of his performance in office, the highest he has polled so far this year and an increase of 4 percentage points compared to a similar poll last week.

 

Since January, the proportion of adults who approved of Trump has ranged between 37 percent and 43 percent.

 

Trump heralded the summary of the Mueller report as a “complete and total exoneration” and vowed to strike back with investigations of his own against unnamed political enemies who he believes are guilty of “evil” and “treasonous things.”

 

Democrats have called on Barr to release the full report, a position shared by a majority of poll respondents.

 

Among those familiar with Barr's summary, only 9 percent said it had changed their thinking about Trump’s ties to Russia and 57 percent said they want to see the entire report.

 

Thirty-eight percent of all adults, including two out of three Democrats, support efforts by Democratic leaders to continue the Russia investigation in Congress, according to the poll.

 

The poll also found that 39 percent felt that Trump “should be impeached,” while 49 percent felt that he should not.

 

Click here to see the entire Reuters/Ipsos poll: https://tmsnrt.rs/2CzWPJl 

 

(Reporting by Chris Kahn; Editing by Colleen Jenkins and Leslie Adler)

 

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-- © Copyright Reuters 2019-03-27

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Message, message, message, run a poll to gauge effectiveness.   Keep doing that until the needle moves the way you want it to.  Publishing those kinds of favorable poll results also helps influence people toward the illusion of an emerging consensus.  That's been the game for 2 years.  Marketing and media/PR types have it down to a science. 

 

The needle is already sliding back the other direction though.  Unfortunately, Trump doesn't do himself any favors and is his own worst enemy.  Agreed, there might be some traction on the obstruction angle.  We'll see.

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"...Despite report findings, almost half of Americans think Trump colluded with Russia: Reuters/Ipsos poll..."
 
I do not find this poll result surprising; unfortunately, a simple statement by Barr is not and will never be enough to convince many/most people; there is too much cynicism, to much information already released which must be accounted for (and hasn't been), and too much partisanship.
 
There must be public hearings with Mueller testifying; nothing else will satisfy.
 
Period.
 
And, there remain questions regarding the issue of Obstruction of Justice; the case against having charges for that is... inexplicable to me. 
 
Again, there must be public hearings with Mueller testifying; nothing else will satisfy.
 
Period.
 
The whole reason that there is a Special Counsel Law in general and having Mueller personally in that position specifically is to remove the politics from the questions. By not having Mueller testify/answer directly, the questions remain.
 
And, they will continue to remain until he does...
 

And the special counsel regulations state the report is the domain of the executive branch and the attorney general disseminates what he sees fit.

Get over it

Period,,

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2 hours ago, webfact said:

Thirty-eight percent of all adults, including two out of three Democrats, support efforts by Democratic leaders to continue the Russia investigation in Congress, according to the poll.

I think those politicians had better be careful of what they wish.

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