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BANGKOK 20 May 2019 00:20
marcusarelus

What does an old guy need to move back to America

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Posted (edited)

I don't drive so no car.  I'm almost 80.  Limits my choice of locals. 

My driver's license expired years ago will a passport open a bank account? 

Need a bank account for Social security. 

Don't want to buy a house at my age.  I'll rent.  What kind of reference will I give after 10 years in Thailand? 

No American credit cards.  How do I get one of those? 

Health care is medicare and VA.  Can I pick any VA hospital I want and move there? 

 

No credit, no reference.  How do I get a phone and electricity and cable? 

 

Don't imagine I'd have any old debt as the statue of limitations on credit card debt is 7 years. 

Edited by marcusarelus
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another thing is to get all your ID paperwork together. Passport obviously. Birth certificate is very important. Social Security Card. Retired Military ID. I would also have expired passports, expired ID cards or drivers licenses, if any.  

 

 

 

   

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It might depend on your state, but you need to find your credit scores. There is one or two that do it for free, although it is not the actual scores, they are estimates i think.... creditkarma or something. You can do it all online. 

 

Sometimes the apartment managers will be more upfront... "you need at least a 600 score". Because every time you apply to an apartment you have to pay for a credit check, and it costs like 20 bucks. Do not get me started on that stuff. 

 

That is the main thing i would worry about, your credit score. I have returned home after about five years once btw. Everything eles is fairly straightforward except for those credit scores. 

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Posted (edited)
22 minutes ago, TallGuyJohninBKK said:

This is one of the reasons I always advise U.S. expats to NOT cut their ties with the home country, or let them lapse, even after living many years in TH.

 

On the banking front, some banks will allow you to open a new account just with a U.S. passport and without a state DL, but they seem to be more the exception than the rule these days. Once you move back, even if you don't get a DL, you can always get a state ID card that will serve the same purpose (except for driving).

 

One specific credit union that I know is friendly to expats and those living abroad is State Department Federal Credit Union, which deals in both bank accounts and credit cards. They'll actually open new accounts for expats using their foreign address as opposed to a U.S. address.

 

The renting question is an interesting one. For those who have lived in the U.S. before and have a renters history even if years back, I don't know how long the renter credit check systems go back in terms of finding evidence of good tenancy.

 

I have both a past ownership and renters history in the U.S.  But if I ever decide to go back, I dunno whether any of that will still mean anything if/when I go to try to rent a new place after many years away.

 

 

 

I'm with you on the lunacy of cutting all ties to home country. 

Every expat should keep a drivers license and a bank account at the very least, and at best a home, which is the ultimate bolt hole

 

These days trying to reestablish credit is taking you back to being a teenager, where when you wanted to rent your first apartment Mom & Dad had to co-sign for you.

 

The best way to rent something in this case is a private rental, craigslist or there are in every city facebook buy/sell pages which are full of private rentals.

 

Trying to go to a commercial apartment block, and being able to pass the credit check is very unlikely

 

Credit Unions are the best option for bank accounts and at least some limited credit card options

Edited by GinBoy2
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Try to open an account with SDFCU while you're still in Thailand. You can open with a passport but they will do a hard credit check. You may or may not get approved but you can try. Then with that you can have your S.S. check paid directly into that account. Then when you repatriate you can change the address. That's a start. 

 

Not sure about your budget but decent housing in decent areas where you don't need a car generally carries a high premium in the U.S.

 

There is Uber though. You need to do research on destinations. You might want to look at the old thread I had on affordable U.S. places that don't suck. There are links there about transport.

 

On housing you might be able to negotiate with a private landlord by paying a year's rent in advance. Forget about regular apartment buildings. 

 

How about a roommate situation? Many elders own their homes and rent to other elders for companionship and to share expenses. Then the utilities will be in their name. 

 

I'd have similar issues if I repatriated (but still have a credit history and bank accounts) so I can relate.

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If you establish a bank account, you may be able to get a credit card through them.  Citi Bank, Bank of America, etc.

 

You should be able to get a state ID card (depending on state) on the basis of your passport as proof of ID.  Not everyone drives.  But you'd need an address.

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Posted (edited)
32 minutes ago, Damrongsak said:

If you establish a bank account, you may be able to get a credit card through them.  Citi Bank, Bank of America, etc.

 

You should be able to get a state ID card (depending on state) on the basis of your passport as proof of ID.  Not everyone drives.  But you'd need an address.

Everyone can get a State ID, just based on residency, but generally DMV will require 2 pieces of mail to confirm your address. But if you have a relative who can sign an affidavit that gets around that requirement

 

When my Thai wife moved to the US, and before she got her driver's license we got her an ID card.

 

So long as you can prove legal residency and an SSN I 'think' all States are obliged to issue an ID card.

 

One interesting point btw that we discovered.

 

You can only hold one True ID card, the Gold Star thing.

So if you have an ID card with that, you you need to surrender it if you get a DL. or the DL will not be valid for air travel, and you'll need to carry both.

 

I know this, since after we got back from DMV I noticed that her DL said 'Not Valid For Federal Identification', cost us an additional $18 to get it all taken care of!

Edited by GinBoy2
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1 hour ago, Jingthing said:

Try to open an account with SDFCU while you're still in Thailand. You can open with a passport but they will do a hard credit check. You may or may not get approved but you can try. Then with that you can have your S.S. check paid directly into that account. Then when you repatriate you can change the address. That's a start. 

 

Not sure about your budget but decent housing in decent areas where you don't need a car generally carries a high premium in the U.S.

 

There is Uber though. You need to do research on destinations. You might want to look at the old thread I had on affordable U.S. places that don't suck. There are links there about transport.

 

On housing you might be able to negotiate with a private landlord by paying a year's rent in advance. Forget about regular apartment buildings. 

 

How about a roommate situation? Many elders own their homes and rent to other elders for companionship and to share expenses. Then the utilities will be in their name. 

 

I'd have similar issues if I repatriated (but still have a credit history and bank accounts) so I can relate.

I'm with you on the issue of housing cost and transport.

 

The lower the cost housing tends to also equate to lower, if not pitiful public transit.

 

You are also right however that Uber, and Lyft are in almost all communities now

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1 hour ago, GinBoy2 said:

Everyone can get a State ID, just based on residency, but generally DMV will require 2 pieces of mail to confirm your address. ...

In Virginia, I used to have to use my DL and a piece of mail or two (bills) to prove residency to buy a firearm.  24 firearms later, all I need is my DL and my concealed handgun license (CCL).  With the CCL, I can buy multiple handguns each month.  Life is good.  :clap2:

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21 minutes ago, Damrongsak said:

In Virginia, I used to have to use my DL and a piece of mail or two (bills) to prove residency to buy a firearm.  24 firearms later, all I need is my DL and my concealed handgun license (CCL).  With the CCL, I can buy multiple handguns each month.  Life is good.  :clap2:

Thing is, he's trying to re establish residency.

 

That poses a whole bunch of challenges, from renting an apartment, buying a car way before thinking about buying a Glock.

 

And as for Virginia, I will never ever go there again. Driving back from DC to Manassas on I-95, I got stopped by the cops for driving 75.

They actually prosecuted me for reckless  driving!. Cost me $2000

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A lot of money would help. Amazing how many doors it opens.

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