Jump to content
BANGKOK 19 May 2019 15:29
webfact

Doctors urge ‘living will’ to ease pain in final stage of life

Recommended Posts

Doctors urge ‘living will’ to ease pain in final stage of life

By Pratch Rujivanarom 
The Nation 

 

532bd9ace94b1674d4ff8734b1d1b174.jpeg

 

EVERYBODY HAS the right to die a good death by choosing palliative care in their last years, but nobody can opt for euthanasia, medical experts said.
 

The widely publicised story of a young Thai man, who was in the fourth stage of brain cancer and decided to end his agony with medically assisted suicide in Switzerland, has fuelled debate over whether Thailand is ready to legalise such action. 

 

d48b5465013fd982a632c30d89c60471.jpeg

 

Panellists at the National Health Commission Office’s seminar on people’s right to choose the way they want to die, said recently that everybody has the freedom to choose a good natural death according to law.

 

However, they agreed that speeding up the end of life medically is a form of suicide. 

 

Dr Issarang Nuchprayoon, a medical lecturer at Chulalongkorn University, said most people view end-of-life medical care as both painful and expensive, with doctors focused only on keeping the patient alive as long as possible. 

 

This is not entirely true, Issarang said, pointing to the medical treatment offered by palliative care, in which the primary objective is to allow patients the highest quality end-of-life experience and let them die naturally and peacefully. 

 

“Palliative care does not focus on extending the patient’s life, but ensures that the terminal-stage patient is as comfortable as possible, maintains good mental health in the last days of their life, and has a good peaceful death at the end,” Issarang added.

 

Living will can dictate palliative care

 

Mercy killing is another story, he said, as it seeks to rush a person’s death by ending their life to avoid illness-related pain. 

 

This is not only illegal in most countries, he said, but can also be considered a serious breach of medical ethics.

 

Sawaeng Boonchalermwipat, National Health Commission Board member, said mercy killing was not a legal option in the Kingdom. 

 

Yet, he noted, Article 43 of the National Health Act allows each person to choose how they want to be treated in the final period of their life and avoid painful medical treatment that might extend their life. They can instead write a “living will” and choose to get palliative care. 

 

“Despite the National Health Act having already been in use for 11 years, the majority of people still do not know that under this law they can choose what kind of medical care they prefer to receive at the end of their life. 

 

“Most people are afraid of the agony of modern medical techniques to keep their heart beating, so it is not beyond expectation that many people are supporting the legalisation of mercy killing,” Sawaeng said.

 

“But these people can avoid a painful and expensive death by writing a living will, so others know how they should be treated when their final period of life has come.”

 

He said a living will is easy to write, as it can be written in any form and only needs to include a date and the person’s signature. 

 

He suggested that everybody write a living will to prepare for their inevitable final period. 

 

Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/national/30368390

 

thenation_logo.jpg

-- © Copyright The Nation 2019-04-26

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, canopy said:

Here is a translation of the young Thai man's last post:

 

I have been in switzerland for 10 days

The sky is clear and the sun comes out everyday

Today I am leaving the earth

Just checked out of the hotel

The sky is dark and the rain is out just in time (laughing)

 

Today I will die in this place.

 

“Dust thou art and unto dust thou shall return.” Bible.

 He ain’t leaving anywhere. Death is just transient.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The language used in the article is a little unclear. Would there be a suggested format/text to successfully making this palliative living will, and does it need to be in the Thai language ? Thanks to all....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
49 minutes ago, jaltsc said:

"...nobody can opt for euthanasia..."

 

Nothing says "totalitarian fascist" more than: "We own your body, and say what you can and cannot do with it."

 

My body. My choices. Just as long as I don't physically harm anyone else in the process. If someone else's feelings are hurt by the actions I inflict upon myself. Not my problem. Get on with your own life.

I agree with you, 100%

 

But only with the second part, the first part is, by your definition a statement that nearly all countries of the world are totalarian and fascist because of existing laws regarding assisted or even unassisted euthanasia.

 

However, the issue is the "assisted" part of euthanasia which is frown upon.

Understandably seen the doctor's oath and existing laws.

And yes, even in certain countries where euthanasia is more or less accepted or tolerated, it is up to the "patient" to take the final step like opening the drip, drinking the solution, or whatever.

Edited by hansnl
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Orton Rd said:

Thai palliative care, paracetamol

Not true, at all!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A simple Transfer on Death system would be nice.  Sign some documents so when you pop your clogs, Thai bank accounts and/or Thai investment portfolios transfer to designated survivor(s).

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The last place I would want to be receiving palliative care is here, from what I have seen they are years behind the west, still unwilling to give proper pain relief.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...