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With joy and unity, Thais celebrate historic coronation

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With joy and unity, Thais celebrate historic coronation

By Phuwit Limviphuwat 
The Nation

 

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The Grand Palace and Rajdamnoen Avenue, landmarks of “Old Bangkok”, shone brilliantly with warm yellow lights on Friday night, a night before the Royal Coronation of HM King Maha Vajiralongkorn.

 

The Democracy Monument, located in the centre of the historic avenue, was lit brightly, sparking a rare atmosphere of optimism and unity. Photographers and visitors from around the country encircled the monument. Many arrived early on Friday night to witness Thailand’s first Royal Coronation in 69 years, with the previous ceremony dating back to 1950 when HM King Bhumibol Adulyadej was coronated.

 

King Bhumibol’s legacy continues to shape the mood of Thais around the country, with people viewing him as a father figure. Citizens gathered in the area to witness this historic event expressed a collective sense of pride and joy to celebrate the crowning of their new king, embracing their new father with open arms.

 

On Saturday morning, only a few hours before the ceremony commences, the space surrounding the avenue was transformed. From large roads leading towards the Grand Palace to small quiet alleys, crowds gathered, all wearing yellow in respect for the monarchy.

 

The sleazy Khaosan Road, normally filled with tourists, nightclubs and vendors selling exotic deep fried tarantulas, was transformed into a sober area as police officials set up fences in the street for crowds to gather and wait for the ceremony.

 

With the ceremony underway, the soundscape of Old Bangkok shifted, ringing with sounds of excitement from people who had travelled across the country to witness the ceremony for the first time in their lives. Loudspeakers echoed a narration of the traditions and processes of the coronation ceremony at key locations surrounding the Grand Palace.

 

Standing patiently on a pavement on Rajdamnoen Avenue was Ning, 45, from Ang Thong province. Ning said she was pleased to have the opportunity to witness the ceremony. This is a “once in a lifetime” opportunity, she said. Ning hopes the ceremony will help unify Thais all over the country and believes Thai people have been eager to celebrate the crowning of their new King.

 

Orn, a 22-year-old university student from Surin province, stood in front of the Grand Palace as the ceremony took place. She said the atmosphere surrounding the Grand Palace has been vibrant since early morning. Thai people are excited about the ceremony, as it is a historic event that many people like myself have never witnessed. The heat of Bangkok has not scorched the enthusiasm of the Thai people in any way. Despite the hot sun, the atmosphere is fresh with the energy and excitement of the people, she said.

 

Nok, 38, a teacher in Bangkok, feels delighted to have the opportunity to witness the ceremony. “I have always been curious about the grand coronation ceremony which is steeped in Thailand’s tradition. In general, Thais are interested to learn more about this ceremony, forming a sense of unity for all of us,” Nok said.

 

Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/national/30368859

 

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-- © Copyright The Nation 2019-05-05

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King proclaims himself the Royal Patron of Buddhism

By Marisa Chimprabha 
The Nation

 

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HM King Maha Vajiralongkorn proceeds to the Temple of the Emerald Buddha to proclaim himself the Royal Patron of Buddhism.

 

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A group of 80 monks led by the Supreme Patriarch hold a blessing ceremony for the King.

 

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During the ceremony, HM proclaimed himself as the Royal Patron of Buddhism.

 

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The King will then pay his respects to the statues of the previous kings of the Chakri Dynasty in Prasad Phrathep Bidon before proceeding to the Dusit Maha Prasad Throne Hall to worship the Royal ashes.

 

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Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/national/30368857

 

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-- © Copyright The Nation 2019-05-05

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People brave the heat to watch broadcast of Royal Coronation

By The Nation

 

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At 2pm on Saturday, many loyal subjects remained seated on sidewalks in front of the Grand Palace and Sanam Luang to watch live broadcast of the Royal Coronation rites on monitor screens despite the hot weather.

 

One of them, Yao Sirapong, 45, a farmer from Mukdahan province. She took a bus from Mukdahan on Friday night and considered herself lucky to have the once-in-a-lifetime chance to witness the event.

 

Narongdej Naksathorn, 21, a university student, said the Royal Coronation rites provided an opportunity for the young generation to take part in and study the ancient rites that have not taken place in Thailand for decades.

 

Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/breakingnews/30368856

 

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-- © Copyright The Nation 2019-05-05

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Foreign countries congratulate HM on coronation

By The Nation

 

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Foreign embassies and missions have offered their congratulations on His Majesty the King's coronation on Saturday, extending their good wishes to the monarch and looking forward to closer ties between their countries and Thailand under his reign.

 

Singapore President Halimah Yacob has written a congratulatory letter to His Majesty King Maha Vajiralongkorn on this occasion.

 

"On behalf of the people of Singapore, I extend my warmest congratulations and best wishes to Your Majesty on the most auspicious occasion of Your Majesty’s Coronation. I am confident that the people of Thailand will continue to see development and abundance in the years ahead under Your Majesty’s reign," Yacob said in her letter.

 

A copy of the letter was published on the website of Singapore's Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

 

The Singaporean president also said she looked forward to “the further strengthening and deepening of the warm ties between our two countries under Your Majesty’s reign”. She also invited the King to visit Singapore.

 

The Embassy of the People’s Republic of China on Saturday said that the Chinese diplomats in Thailand were joining Thais in celebrating His Majesty's coronation.

 

"May Thailand enjoy stability, peace and prosperity under the reign of His Majesty King Maha Vajiralongkorn Bodindradebayavarangkun. We are confident that thanks to His Majesty's attention and support, the relations between China and Thailand will progress continuously towards the next steps," the embassy said.

 

Meanwhile, the Embassy of Sweden on its Facebook page extended its congratulations and best wishes "for His Majesty’s health and happiness, and for the well-being and the prosperity of the people of Thailand".

 

The Embassy of France extended its warmest congratulations to His Majesty on the occasion of his coronation.

 

"France is very attached to its friendship ties with Thailand, which dates back to the first diplomatic mission of Siam to France in 1686. France is confident that these ties of trust will continue and strengthen under His Majesty’s reign," the embassy said.

 

The European Union mission in Thailand also joined others in this occasion. "We respectfully extend our cordial congratulations to His Majesty King Maha Vajiralongkorn Bodindradebayavarangkun on the auspicious occasion of the Royal Coronation," the EU said.

 

Also on Saturday, the Restoration Council of the Shan State and its armed wing the Shan State Army (RCSS/SSA) offered their congratulations to King Rama X on his coronation.

 

In a joint statement, the RCSS/SSA said that Thailand is the only nation state of the Tai people that still has king as the head of state. "We shall admire this fact highly," the groups said.

 

 

The RCSS/SSA said that they are also Tai people like Thais, and they wish the King to live long and for the prosperity of all the ethnic Tai people.

 

Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/national/30368855

 

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-- © Copyright The Nation 2019-05-05
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HM the King grants grand audience to well wishers

By The Nation

 

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His Majesty the King grants a grand audience to members of the Royal Family, the Privy Council and the Cabinet and senior officials on Saturday. He thanked them for their best wishes and urged them to join him and Thai people in working towards prosperity and happiness.

 

The session began at 2.59pm at Amarindra Vinicchaya Throne Hall during which the audience offered their best wishes to the King.

 

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HRH Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn led the group to congratulate the King on his coronation and wished him good health and prosperity.

 

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Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha joined the well wishing and followed by other high-ranking officials in all branches.

 

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Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/national/30368854

 

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-- © Copyright The Nation 2019-05-05

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Artillery fire by Armed Forces marks Royal Coronation

By The Nation

 

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The Royal Thai Army, Navy and Air Force honoured His Majesty the King with artillery fire as part of the Royal Coronation rites on Saturday.

 

The Army also used four ancient cannons for the salute firing at Sanam Luang. The artillery and cannon fire came from the First Artillery Regiment.

 

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The Bangkok Naval base of the Navy fired its salute at the Wichai Prasit Fort inside the Navy headquarters.

 

The Air Force’s Anti-Aircraft Artillery regiment fired its salute at the Air Force Academy.

 

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The first salute of 101 rounds was fire at 10.09am at the start of the Royal Purification rites.

 

The second salute saw 101 rounds of artillery fire and 40 rounds from the ancient cannons at 10.59am when the chief Brahmin presented the King with the Royal Golden Plaque bearing the King’s official title.

 

The third salute of 21 rounds will be fired at 2.20pm.

 

Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/breakingnews/30368853

 

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-- © Copyright The Nation 2019-05-05

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His Majesty the King now enthroned

tewit kemtong

 

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BANGKOK, 4 May 2019 (NNT) - His Majesty King Maha Vajiralongkorn has now risen to the throne following the coronation ceremonies on Saturday.

 

Between 10.09 a.m. and 12.00 p.m., His Majesty the King attended the sacred water ceremony of Muratha Phisek at Chakrabat Biman Royal Residence, and the anointment ceremony at Baisal Daksin Throne Hall.

 

His Majesty the King proceeded to the Bhadrapitha Throne where the Chief Brahmin presented him with the Royal Golden Plaque of His Majesty’s official title, the Royal Regalia, the Ancient and Auspicious Orders, and the Weapons of Sovereignty. After the Crowning and Investiture Ceremony, His Majesty the King was thus completely established as monarch in accordance with the ancient royal tradition.

 

In the afternoon, His Majesty the King attended a blessing session at Amarindra Vinicchaya Throne Hall and paid homage to the Emerald Buddha in the presence of revered monks at the Emerald Buddha temple and paid his respects to the statues of former monarchs at Phra Thep Bidon Hall and his respects to their relics at Dusit Maha Prasart Throne Hall.

 

The ceremonies for His Majesty the King’s name and signature and the endowment of royal titles for members of the Royal Household as well as His Majesty the King’s land procession in Phra Nakhon area from Arphorn Phimok Prasart Throne Hall to Bovorn Nivet temple, Ratchabophit temple and Phra Chetuphon temple are scheduled for Sunday.

 

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Power of the throne

By The Nation 

 

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HM King Maha Vajiralongkorn sits on the Bhadrapitha Throne during the Crowning and the Investiture Ceremony on Saturday.

 

A look at the three thrones that are used for the royal coronation

 

THE Bhadrapitha Throne on which His Majesty King Maha Vajiralongkorn is seated on Saturday as he receives the Royal Regalia, Royal Decorations and the Royal Utensils as well as giving the First Royal Command can be traces back to the Ayutthaya Era (1350-1767).

 

While there is no evidence suggesting that the Bhadrapitha Throne and the Atha Disa Udumbara Raja Asana Throne were completed during that period, what is known is that King Rama IV selected the gold-inlay niello chair made of wood from the cluster fig tree found in the South of Thailand and which was presented by Chao Phraya Nakhon Si Thammaraj (Noi-klang) to become the “coronation chair”. 

 

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HM King Maha Vajiralongkorn sits on the Bhadrapitha Throne during the Crowning and the Investiture Ceremony on Saturday.

 

The Bhadrapitha Throne has a semicircular shape with armrests and a backrest with a few supports connected to the seat.

 

 The throne was decorated with the seven-tiered umbrella for the ceremony in the reigns of Kings Rama I to Rama VII, but the umbrella was adjusted to become nine-tiered for the coronation of His Majesty King Bhumibol Adulyadej (Rama IX). 

 

The seat of the throne is a gold-plated copper sheet, inscribed with the figure of a lion in the centre and surrounded by the Thai pattern known as kranok. 

 

The edges and the legs of the throne are decorated with gold-inlay niello designs. The carved wooden base is gilded and decorated with glass mosaics. 

 

The two flanking tables are of carved wood, gilded with gold and decorated with glass mosaic with legs carved into the figures of nagas. 

 

It is upon these tables that the Royal Regalia and the Royal Utensils are placed. The throne is enshrined in the western portion of the Baisal Daksin Throne Hall inside the Grand Palace. 

 

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King Chulalongkorn (Rama V) occupies the Bhadrapitha Throne on November 16, 1873.

 

During a recent talk on “The Royal Coronation in the Rattanakosin Era” organised by the Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn Anthropology Centre, historian Dr Dinar Boontham explained that the coronation chair was influenced by the English coronation chair also known as King Edward’s Chair (1232-1307) and which was created in 1300. It is a high-backed, Gothic-style armchair carved from oak. Gilded lions were added in the 16th century to form the legs of the chair and it is here that the British monarchs sit when they are invested with regalia and crowned.

 

The lion represents power and courage, while the fig tree is considered sacred and of religious significance in both Buddhism and Hinduism. 

 

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King Prajadhipok (Rama VII) sits atop the Atha Disa Udumbara Raja Asana Throne in the Baisal Daksin Throne Hall on February 25, 1925.

 

The Atha Disa Udumbara Raja Asana Throne, a pedestal or bench-like throne, is also made of fig or udumbara wood, which is the source of its name. 

 

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HM King Maha Vajiralongkorn receives the anointing water from Privy Council President and statesman Prem Tinsulanonda at the Atha Disa Udumbara Raja Asana Throne on Saturday.

 

It is carved in an octagonal form to represent the eight directions of the compass. The wood-carved throne, decorated with gold gilt and ornamented with glass mosaic, is placed under the seven-tiered umbrella and enshrined at the eastern part of the Baisal Daksin Throne Hall. It is used as the seat of the King when he receives the anointing water. 

 

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King Vajiravudh (Rama VI) wears the royal vestments and crown-headdress as he sits on the Budtan Kanchana Singhasana Throne during his coronation on December 2, 1911.

 

The third throne used in the coronation ceremony is the Budtan Kanchana Singhasana Throne. This is a medium-sized golden bench, made of carved wood, gilded with gold and ornamented with carved figures of garuda and thepphanom, the heavenly deities that surround the two-layered base above the pedestal. 

 

In the grand Royal Coronation Ceremony, this structure will be placed upon the Royal Throne. 

 

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King Bhumibol Adulyadej (Rama IX) delivers the Royal Address of Appreciation to well-wishers from the Budtan Kanchana Singhasana Throne on May 5, 1950.

 

When it is mounted under the Royal Nine-tiered Umbrella, Nophapadon Maha Saweta Chatra, it becomes the Budtan Kanchana Singhasana Throne. 

 

The King will be seated on this throne on occasions of important ceremony, such as the Royal Coronation and the celebration of the King’s birthday, to receive an address of benediction. 

 

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HM King Maha Vajiralongkorn sits atop the Budtan Kanchana Singhasana Throne and grants an audience at the Amarinda Vinijaya Throne Hall on Saturday.

 

The golden bench is also used as the Royal Palanquin when the King travels in a Royal Procession circumnavigating the capital. 

 

On these occasions, it will be called the Bhudtan Thong Royal Palanquin.

 

Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/lifestyle/30368862

 

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-- © Copyright The Nation 2019-05-05

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The crowning of King Rama X

By The Nation 

 

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The consecrated water flows from a canopied showerhead for Song Phra Muratha Bhisek or the purification bath of HM King Maha Vajiralongkorn on Saturday.

 

After coronation ceremonies steeped in tradition, HM King Maha Vajiralongkorn pledges ‘to reign with righteousness for the benefit of the people’

 

HIS MAJESTY King Maha Vajiralongkorn (Rama X) completed his enthronement |rituals to become the 10th King of the Chakri Dynasty, honouring venerable traditions and customs, on the first day of the Royal Coronation at the Grand Palace in Bangkok on Saturday.

 

Day one of the three-day auspicious and symbolic ceremony was the most significant in the coronation ceremony, which consisted of a purification bath, the anointment, the crowning of the King and the investiture to declare his regal power.

 

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HM King Maha Vajiralongkorn sits inside a specially erected pavilion in preparation for the Song Phra Muratha Bhisek or the purification bath on Saturday.

 

People in yellow shirts (yellow is considered the colour of Monday, the day of birth of the current monarch) gathered outside the Grand Palace to join in what is considered a once-in-a-lifetime historic occasion. 

 

The last time Thais witnessed this centuries-old royal tradition, which derives from Hinduism and Buddhism and is full of religious symbolism, was during the coronation of His Majesty the late King Bhumibol Adulyadej (Rama IX) on May 5, 1950.

 

HM King Maha Vajiralongkorn arrived at the Grand Palace at 10am together with Queen Suthida and his three children – their Royal Highnesses Princesses Bajrakitiyabha and Sirivannavari Nariratana and Prince Dipangkorn Rasmijoti. Her Royal Highness Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn along with many other members of the Royal Family also attended. The King then proceeded to the Amarindra Vinijaya Throne Hall and the Baisal Daksin Throne Hall to light candles and pay his respects to the Triple Gems, the Buddha statues of the previous nine Kings of Chakri Dynasty and the royal regalia.

 

The purification bath

 

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The consecrated water flows from a canopied showerhead for Song Phra Muratha Bhisek or the purification bath of HM King Maha Vajiralongkorn on Saturday.

 

At 10.09am, the chosen auspicious time, the 66-year-old monarch changed into a gold-trimmed white cloth to participate in Song Phra Muratha Bhisek, or purification bath. He had the purification bath sitting on a fig-wood bench inside a specially erected pavilion with a tiered roof, adjacent to the Chakrapat Biman Royal Residence. Air Chief Marshal Satitpong Sukvimol, the permanent secretary of the Royal Household Bureau, sought the King’s permission to allow the consecrated water to flow from a canopied showerhead. As the consecrated water started flowing, the Brahmin priests blew conch shells and musicians played various instruments to mark the auspicious occasion, while the Armed Forces offered their salutes with artillery and cannon fire.

 

The water used for this ritual came from five principal rivers around the country and from four ancient ponds in Suphan Buri. The rivers – together referred to as Bencha Suttha Khongkha and representing five rivers in India, the origin of these traditions – are the Bang Pakong, Pasak, Chao Phraya, Ratchaburi and Phetchaburi. The four ponds are Sa Ket, Sa Kaeo, Sa Khongkha and Sa Yamuna.

 

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The Supreme Patriarch pours water of benediction over the King’s hands on Saturday.

 

The Supreme Patriarch, His Holiness Somdet Phra Ariyavongsagatayana, later poured water of benediction over the King’s back and hands. Two high-ranking senior members of the Royal Family, MC Pusarn Svasti and MC Chulcherm Yugala, poured the consecrated water from the vessel on the King’s hands. The chief Brahmin priest, Phra Maha Ratcha Khru Sri Wisutthikul, next offered him the sacred vessels with the water and the King poured the water over his head.

 

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His Majesty pours on his head the consecrated water given by the chief Brahmin priest on Saturday. 

 

A bael leaf, with its three points symbolising Hindu gods Brahma, Vishnu and Shiva, was also presented to His Majesty to be placed behind his right ear. MC Ticomporn Yugala later presented him water from 22 vessels made from different materials like gold, silver, copper to jade and bronze, one after another and His Majesty poured the water over his shoulders. 

 

The anointment of Kingship

 

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Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha presents the monarch the anointing water at the Atha Disa Udumbara Raja Asana Throne on Saturday.

 

The next procedure was the most significant rite – Abhisek or the royal anointment. HM King Maha Vajiralongkorn changed into bejewelled regal vestments for the ceremony in the Baisal Daksin Throne Hall. He sat on the octagonal Atha Disa Udumbara Raja Asana Throne, which is made of intricately carved fig wood. 

 

For the anointing, the water was drawn from 107 sources in 76 provinces and from the Satrakom Hall within the Grand Palace in Bangkok. The water was presented to him from the eight cardinal directions of the compass, representing the breadth of the Kingdom, as he turned in a clockwise manner to receive each one, starting from the east, considered the primary direction.

 

Senior members of the Royal Family and high-ranking officials served as Thai people’s representatives to present him the anointing water. MC Pusarn Svasti started from the east, followed by MC Mongkolcharlerm Yugala and MC Chalermsuk Yugala.

 

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HM King Maha Vajiralongkorn receives the anointing water from Privy Council President and statesman Prem Tinsulanonda at the Atha Disa Udumbara Raja Asana Throne on Saturday.

 

They were followed by Privy Council President and statesman Prem Tinsulanonda, Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha, National Legislative Assembly president Pornpetch Wichitcholchai, Supreme Court president Cheep Chulamon, scholar Charas Suwanwela and Interior Minister Anupong Paojinda.

 

The chief Brahmin priest then presented him with the Nophapadol Maha Saweta Chatra – the white, nine-tiered umbrella that is the most important symbol of the supreme sovereign.

 

The investiture and the installing of Her Majesty 

 

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The chief Brahmin priest chants prayers seeking blessings for the King at the Bhadrapitha Throne during the investiture ritual on Saturday.

 

The crowning and investiture ceremonies were held later at the opposite throne, called Bhadrapitha. The chief Brahmin priest presented the monarch the Phra Maha Phichai Mongkut (the Great Crown of Victory) for the King to crown himself. Phra Suphannabat, or the Royal Golden Plaques upon which are inscribed his royal official full title and his horoscope, together with the royal seal of state, the royal regalia, the royal utensils, and the weapons of sovereignty were offered next. 

 

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The chief Brahmin priest presents Phra Maha Phichai Mongkut or the Great Crown of Victory to the King.

 

After completing the bestowment of kingship, His Majesty addressed his first Royal Command in Thai, which was literally translated as “I shall continue, protect and reign with righteousness for the benefit of the people.”

 

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HM the King anoints Queen Suthida with the royal title of Her Majesty on Saturday.

 

Queen Suthida, who was named the new Queen on May 1 after the Royal Gazette announced their marriage on that day, was bestowed the official title of Her Majesty with sacred water from the conch shell together with sacred powder on her forehead as she prostrated herself in front of the King. The 41-year-old Queen was also presented with royal decorations, insignias and royal utensils.

 

The final procedure

 

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HM King Maha Vajiralongkorn grants an audience at the Amarindra Vinijaya Throne Hall on Saturday.

 

In the afternoon session, the King granted an audience to members of the Royal Family, the Privy Council and the Cabinet and other high-ranking officials in the Amarindra Vinijaya Throne Hall. He then proceeded to Wat Phra Kaew, also known as the Temple of the Emerald Buddha, in a royal |procession to declare his willingness to become the Royal Patron of Buddhism.

 

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His Majesty the King is carried on a palanquin to the Temple of the Emerald Buddha to proclaim himself the

Royal Patron of Buddhism.

 

Later, members of the Royal Family also attended a ritual known as Chalerm Phra Raja Montien – the assumption of the royal residence – similar to a private housewarming celebration at the Chakrapat Biman Royal Residence.

 

The complete ceremonies

 

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The royal procession from the Grand Palace to Wat Bovoranives, Wat Rajabopidh and Wat Phra Chetuphon is rehearsed. King Rama X on Sunday pays respects to the principal Buddha statues and the ashes of previous kings and queens.

 

The second day of the ceremony on Sunday sees the ceremonial bestowal of royal names and new titles upon members of the Royal Family. This will be followed by a royal procession along a seven-kilometre route from the Grand Palace to Wat Bovoranives, Wat Rajabopidh and Wat Phra Chetuphon. 

 

At each temple, the King will pay his respects to the principal Buddha statues and the ashes of previous Kings and Queens while at the same time giving the public a chance to greet the new monarch. On the final day, May 6, the King will grant a grand public audience in the Grand Palace.

 

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The royal barge procession to Wat Arun to present kratin – gift of robes presented to monks after the end of the Buddhist Lent – will be held in late October.

 

HM King Maha Vajiralongkorn ascended the throne after his father King Bhumibol passed away on October 13, 2016 and the National Legislative Assembly acknowledged his accession in November the same year. The coronation ceremony is being held after over two years of mourning. 

 

It is the 12th coronation during the 10 reigns of the Chakri Dynasty. Rama I, Rama V and Rama VI each underwent two coronation ceremonies, while Rama VIII died before being formally crowned.

 

Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/lifestyle/30368863

 

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Monarch urges people to uphold country’s stability

By The Nation

 

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HM King Maha Vajiralongkorn in regal vestments grants an audience to representatives of the Royal Family, the Privy Council, the Cabinet, as well as senior officials, who had come to offer their best wishes and pay homage to the monarch at Amarindra

 

King Rama X gives audience to representatives of Royal Family, Privy Council, Cabinet


IN THE afternoon session of the first day of the three-day Royal Coronation ceremony on Saturday, His Majesty King Maha Vajiralongkorn, sat on the Budtan Kanchana Singhasana, or the Royal Throne. 

 

Clad in regal vestments and wearing the Great Crown of Victory, with the royal nine-tiered umbrella “Nophapadol Maha Saweta Chatra” (Nine-tiered Umbrella of the State) rising over him, he was flanked by pages carrying the royal regalia. 

 

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HM King Maha Vajiralongkorn in regal vestments grants an audience to representatives of the Royal Family, the Privy Council, the Cabinet, as well as senior officials, who had come to offer their best wishes and pay homage to the monarch at Amarindra Vinijaya Throne Hall on Saturday.

 

The King granted an audience to representatives of the Royal Family, the Privy Council, the Cabinet as well as senior officials, who had all gathered to offer their best wishes and to pay homage to the new King at Amarindra Vinijaya Throne Hall. 

 

On the auspicious occasion, Her Royal Highness Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn represented the Royal Family members in offering their best wishes to His Majesty the King. She declared every member of the Royal Family was determined to uphold the truth and promised loyalty to the King. 

 

“We, all the members of the Royal Family, declare our honesty and loyalty to make our best efforts to uphold the prestige of the Royal House of Chakri Dynasty.”

 

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Her Royal Highness Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn, representing theRoyal Family, conveys their best wishes to the monarch.

 

Next, Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha, who represented the Cabinet, government officials as well as the military, Pornpetch Wichitcholchai, president of National Legislative Assembly, and Cheep Chulamon, president of the Supreme Court, also conveyed their best wishes to the King. 

 

In return, the King offered his blessings to members of the Royal Family, the representatives, and the Thai people. He thanked those who had come to offer their wishes and requested all Thai people to share his goal of fulfilling one’s duty by upholding the country’s stability and the people’s happiness to the utmost possible. He prayed to holy spirits to protect and bring prosperity to everyone.

 

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His Majesty the King is carried on a palanquin to the Temple of the Emerald Buddha to proclaim himself the Royal Patron of Buddhism on Saturday.

 

His Majesty proceeded to the Temple of the Emerald Buddha to proclaim his formal declaration of faith by demonstrating his willingness to become the Royal Patron of Buddhism. He sat on the Budtan Kanchana Singhasana, which was carried on a royal palanquin by royal guards. 

 

Along the way, many Thai people wearing yellow shirts sat on the ground, defying the heat, holding His Majesty’s portrait above their heads while cheering “Long Live the King”. 

 

The King then went to the Prasad Phra Dhepbidorn or the Royal Pantheon to pay homage to nine statues of previous kings enshrined inside this building. 

 

After that, the King proceeded to the Dusit Maha Prasad Throne Hall to pay homage to the Royal Relics of his ancestors, the previous Kings and Queens. There are a total of 22 Royal Relics, dating from King Rama I to King Rama IX

 

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The King pays homage to the Royal Relics  of previous Kings and Queens at the Dusit MahaPrasad Throne Hall on Saturday.

 

According to the official Royal Coronation programme, the Assumption of the Royal Residence – another important part of the ceremony that took place at Chakrabat Biman Royal Residence – was a private event and hence there was no live broadcast.

 

The details of the final session of the ceremony have been adjusted to be appropriate for the circumstances of each reign, according to an explanation on the history of the Royal Coronation ceremony by His Royal Highness Prince Damrong Rajanubhab (1862-1943). 

 

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The high-ranking officials prepares the canopy bed during the the Assumption of the Royal Residence on Saturday.

 

The full Royal Coronation ceremony is divided into two main sections: first, the coronation ceremony, for the glorification of the royal official title, and secondly, the Assumption of the Royal Residence Ceremony, for the King to reside in the palace for at least one night. The purpose of the ceremony is to symbolically take up the royal residence in the palace and perform a housewarming.

 

Royal auspicious items and utensils are taken along for the Assumption of the Royal Residence at Chakrapat Biman Royal Residence. The royal auspicious items include a cat, known as wila in Pali language, the mortar stone, auspicious seeds, green gourd, a golden key and a gold blossom of the betel palm. More objects were later added such as the whisk, which is made of the tail of a male white elephant and white rooster. The person bearing the sacred royal staff, one of the items of the royal regalia, carries it into the ceremony. 

 

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Their Majesties King Maha Vajiralongkorn and Queen Suthida in the royal procession of the Assumption of the Royal Residence on Saturday.

 

Traditionally, only persons belonging to the Royal Family are responsible for carrying the royal auspicious items. In olden days, the bearers of these auspicious articles for the Assumption of the Royal Residence ceremony were only women of the Royal Family.

 

Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/lifestyle/30368864

 

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-- © Copyright The Nation 2019-05-05

 

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