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Hi all,

 

I just bought a new welding machine - Kanto KT-IGBT-451 and trying to get the hang of welding... 

I can get a spark but can't hold an arc for more than a couple of seconds at a time (most time I cant get beyond the spark..).

I am using Kobe Steel electrodes, RB-26/2.6mm. The welder has a 2nd knob for arc force and I tried various settings from min to max and many steps in between.

I have read on some welding forums that some rodes are easier to work with and I guess that as a beginner I might be better off trying those. The question is - which is the best for beginners that is available in Thailand? 

I would appreciate any information about electrodes available here and also if anyone can explain how to use the arc force.

 

Thanks 🙂

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Checking the actual voltage available could give some clue to the "couple of seconds" burst.

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Electrodes here are limited to 6013 Kobe,Bison and maybe one other.

It took me a year on and off to get the hang of it and I am still crap.

A few tips I found out for myself.

Like you i tried all the settings and have realised that for general 1.5-2.3g steel a setting of 105A gets the steel hot enough almost immediately.

If your steel is painted forget it though primer is ok.

I prefer the bison electrodes but they must be dry, in wet season i have put mine in the oven and then kept them inside in a cling film.

Thicker steel is much easier to weld, the 1.2g requires more skill and a setting around 75A so as not to burn a hole in it.

 

Like most jobs its not as easy as it looks, and needs practice.

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12 minutes ago, eyecatcher said:

Electrodes here are limited to 6013 Kobe,Bison and maybe one other.

7016 Yawata are also availableIMG_7353.thumb.JPG.3cca8c0f0539ec2ef791e4b582777118.JPG

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Before you even start welding ensure you have a good connection with the work clamp. Some of the clamps provided are a poor excuse so you should clean back to bright metal where you clamp it on. When you strike the arc lay the electrode over to about 45 degrees and the arc should maintain now you can stand it more upright and do some welding. Practice and get one of crossies self darkening helmet, I know if I had one I’d prob be able to weld by now. Number 1 get a good connection on that work clamp. Good luck


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57 minutes ago, eyecatcher said:

Like most jobs its not as easy as it looks, and needs practice.

 

+ 106

 

I learnt XX years back as an apprentice (arc and gas), it took me a considerable amount of practice to re-learn (and the pigeons still poo neater than my welds).

 

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You tube is your friend, plenty on there to help and guide you.

 

Arc force......see here

 

https://youtu.be/Fph3SFeMfVA

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3 hours ago, Crossy said:

Task A - Nip down to your local welding supply place and get an "automatic" welding helmet, it makes life sooo much easier.

 

Get some 1/4" scrap and practice starting and holding the arc, about 80A should be good with those rods.

 

No idea what "arc force" does, is the manual any help? Failing that set it mid-way and forget it.

 

already ordered an automatic welding helmet from lazada. I'm sure it will make life easier when I'll have 2 free hands...

as for scraps - I have lots of metal scraps, leftovers from my house construction..... Those kind of U shape metal used for the roofing beams. 

the arc force knob is supposed to compensate for long/short arc but no clear instructions about it

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3 hours ago, Vacuum said:

Checking the actual voltage available could give some clue to the "couple of seconds" burst.

do you mean the outlet voltage? I don't have a volt meter, but during construction and for some tasks after construction was done the workers used to connect their Welles to the same supply so I guess it should be ok

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Agree with all comments above. Tried my first welding 2-3 years ago, disastrous to begin with. Just practice, practice and a bit more practice. With that size welding rods, do not try to weld anything smaller then 2.6mm steel else you will just end up putting holes in it, especially whilst learning. Definitely get the auto darkening helmet, makes things so much easier. Also spend the hard time preparing the steel, with an angle grinder on where you are going to weld and also where you attach the clamp, you will find it much easier to both start and keep an arc. On my set, using 2.6 rods, I usually have the amps set at 85-90 . I have also found for me ,It’s so much easier welding in darker environments ie not in direct sunlight


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& wear a long sleeve shirt else you will burn! :wink:

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Electrodes are quite sensitive to humidity, a lot of that in Thailand. My guess would be you have a crappy batch.

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1 hour ago, eyecatcher said:

Electrodes here are limited to 6013 Kobe,Bison and maybe one other.

It took me a year on and off to get the hang of it and I am still crap.

A few tips I found out for myself.

Like you i tried all the settings and have realised that for general 1.5-2.3g steel a setting of 105A gets the steel hot enough almost immediately.

If your steel is painted forget it though primer is ok.

I prefer the bison electrodes but they must be dry, in wet season i have put mine in the oven and then kept them inside in a cling film.

Thicker steel is much easier to weld, the 1.2g requires more skill and a setting around 75A so as not to burn a hole in it.

 

Like most jobs its not as easy as it looks, and needs practice.

Like most jobs its not as easy as it looks <<< right on...

As for the different brands of electrodes - which did you use as a beginner? Is there a real difference in ease / difficulty (for beginners)?

Not realizing at the beginning that the amp rate is related to the thickness of the electrode, in my initial attempts I went higher and higher on the amp rate...  Last night I dug into the internet and today I was using mostly 75amp, but also tried a bit lower and u to 80 (the range for the Kobe 2.6mm is 45-95 as it says on the box)

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