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Water Only Fasting...Should you do it / How should you do it.

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1 hour ago, Artisi said:

Let me clarify, my  understanding of fasting is a state of no food for a period of time ranging 5,10,15,20 days or more for rehabilitation of poor health / illness, anything else is a diet fad with little real benefit in the longer term. 

What you and many others are talking about is not eating for 2 - 3 days, it has its benefits for some people but has absolutely nothing to do with fasting for return of good health. If I sense a cold or similar coming on, I will not eat for 2/3 to allow the body to concentrate on the bug and not having to concentrate on digesting food, the bodies first priority. 

 

Fasting is only for loosing weight for vanity is pure nonsense.

 

I would suggest a little research on long term fasting in the case of illness and its benefits. 

As for saying I don't seem to understand the metabolic science of the fasted state, is incorrect. 

 

Not trying to start an argument here about fasting and health, I learnt more than 30 years to say what I have to say - if people want to listen that's good - if not, I'll just keep it to myself and look after my own well being. 

Your definition of "fasting" as you stated above is grossly incorrect.  Technically, the term "fasting" implies no time constraint whatsoever.  Fasting is simply the willing abstinence or reduction from some or all food, drink, or both.  Nutritional fasting has efficacy when done for as little as 18 hours (i.e. intermittent fasting).  In the case of a full water fast, most adaptive biochemical and physiological changes that will enhance metabolic health occur during the first 72 hours.  72 hours is the "sweet spot" for self-induced fasting because you derive most of the metabolic benefits with the least health risks that a longer fast would present.  The idea that a fast must be "5,10,15,20 days or more" to be of benefit to metabolic health is pure nonsense.

 

You are obviously not as well read on this topic as you believe.  You should become familiar with the landmark studies by "Dr. Kevin Hill" into animal starvation response to learn what you apparently do not know about the various stages of physiological change that occur as one enters the fasted state.

 

Perhaps you should also become familiar with the work of Dr. Yoshinori Ohsumi, who was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 2016 for his groundbreaking research into fasting based autophagic mechanisms.

 

BTW, I clearly acknowledged the legitimacy of longer-term fasting for medical reasons, so maybe you should read things a little more carefully before making critical remarks and telling me to do more research.

 

Also, please don't incorrectly paraphrase my words!  That's either ignorant, or else incredibly rude and insulting!  I did NOT say "...Fasting is only for loosing weight for vanity".   My actual remark was "...Fasting is nothing more than a fad diet if the sole intention is to loose weight for vanity reasons". 

 

If your misrepresentation of what I said is any indication of your analytical skills, it's no wonder you have such a skewed understand this topic.

 

I am very well read on this subject.  Not trying to be a smart-ass but you might truly be impressed with the REAL underlying science..if you have an inquisitive nature and an open-mind.  If not, that's OK too.  Everybody's entitled to their opinion even if it flies in the face of scientific fact.

Edited by Kohsamida

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2 hours ago, Kohsamida said:

Totally get where you're coming from!  There's so much BS out there about nutrition, and most of it is just plain nonsense posted by people with hidden, self-serving agendas (usually financially based).  When it comes to metabolic health, I am a firm believer is what's termed "fingerprint medicine".  No two people have the same precise nutritional needs.  Everyone's body reacts differently to various foods.  It makes no sense to me for a person to adopt a particular nutritional dogma advocated by this health guru or that guru.  I think it's the responsibility of every individual to do two things; 1) becoming knowledgable about very basic metabolic science from reliable science-based sources (not YouTube health Gurus), and then learn to listen to your own body to discover how it reacts to various foods.  It will tell you everything you need to know if you truly attuned to it. 

 

The body will tell you in no uncertain terms if it reacts well or not to a particular food if you are attuned to what it's trying to tell you.  It takes time and commitment to master this, as opposed to blindly following someone else's weight loss dieting protocol.  Your goal should not merely be to lose weight but to establish a nutritional strategy that is correct specifically for you within the context of universally accepted sound nutritional principles.  Those two things go hand-in-hand.  For example,  I think it's a sound nutritional guideline to avoid heavily processed foods in which essential (healthy) fats have been stripped and replaced with refined sugar based carbohydrates.  But, when it comes to whether or not you should eat red meats, I think the jury is out on that one.  For some it might cause issues, for others...not so much.

 

Personally, I went through a period of time dealing with near-obesity and like most I was attracted to all sorts of weight-loss diets.  None of them worked in the long-term.  The reason is that weight-loss diets are NOT the key to shedding excess body fat.  Changing your nutritional lifestyle is the key!  You can't just adopt someone else's strategy; you have to find one that is right specifically for you.  It takes some time and involves some trial and error, and most importantly it takes learning to be attuned to what your body is telling you but if you stick it out, it seems to work well.  At least it did for me.  I was in a real mess art one point in my life.  My doctor informed me I was pre-diabetic and hypertensive (BP was 180/120).  He put me on statins and drugs to control blood sugar none of which helped.  It was only when I decided to take responsibility for my own health that I discovered that changing my nutrition lifestyle was the real key, and it not only worked but worked very quickly.

 

I think the thing to appreciate is that the body is actually a finely tuned and self-correcting metabolic machine when it is properly nourished.  The problem is that in our modern-day world much of what is consumed is processed foods that have been stripped of natural (and essential fats) and replaced with things like high fructose corn syrup.  HFCS is in everything these days!  It wreaks havoc on metabolic hormonal balance and our bodies ability to efficiently metabolize stored body fat.  As a result, many people just accumulate more and more body fat.  Insulin insensitivity becomes an issue, and livers become engorged in fat.  That's when things start going really bad.  The insidious thing is that most people have no real symptoms all of this is happening.  Most will attribute increased weight with simply getting older.  Symptoms of "fatty liver" usually won't present themselves until your doctor gives you the unwelcome news that you are pre-diabetic.

 

Today, I don't ascribe to any nutritional dogma at all.  My nutritional strategy is made up of elements from Vegan and Paleo that seem to work well for me  but the over-riding factor is simply "listening" to my body; how it reacts to various foods.  Personally I find that two meals a day is optimal for me.  I don't limit any food groups at all, and I don't count calories.  I DO manage my macronutrient ratio carefully.  I keep carbs relatively low and try to think of them only as fuel for the body, not tempting foods that I might end up mindlessly grazing on while watching TV.

 

Bottom line, Gain a true understanding of the basic principles of metabolic science, and then through trial & error find those foods that your body works best with, add a dose of plain old common sense, and I think it would be hard for anyone not to vastly improve their metabolic health in very short period of time...like weeks, not months or years!  I found this to be true for myself, and don;t see any reason why it can't be true for everyone else

 

Thank you for your full reply.

I get what you are saying about listening to your body etc, but it is extremely difficult to isolate the good from the bad.

 

For example, when my digestive system was a mess earlier this year, I started on daily kefir which seemed to be beneficial. It took me about 3 months to work out that as a result of very strong medication last year, I am now lactose intolerant. Having tried non lactose kefirs which dont work well, I have given up kefir and I am far better. But is it that or something else? 

 

I have always enjoyed cooked onions without problems but od'd on them earlier in a spanish omelette at a restaurant. Really messed me up, and even a little cooked onion now is problematic. 

Basically as we have multiple foodstuff each day, trial and error to isolate the good from the bad is a lengthy process - unless you have found shortcuts somehow?

 

Thank you again for your time

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1 hour ago, beau thai said:

Thank you for your full reply.

I get what you are saying about listening to your body etc, but it is extremely difficult to isolate the good from the bad.

 

For example, when my digestive system was a mess earlier this year, I started on daily kefir which seemed to be beneficial. It took me about 3 months to work out that as a result of very strong medication last year, I am now lactose intolerant. Having tried non lactose kefirs which dont work well, I have given up kefir and I am far better. But is it that or something else? 

 

I have always enjoyed cooked onions without problems but od'd on them earlier in a spanish omelette at a restaurant. Really messed me up, and even a little cooked onion now is problematic. 

Basically as we have multiple foodstuff each day, trial and error to isolate the good from the bad is a lengthy process - unless you have found shortcuts somehow?

 

Thank you again for your time

Unfortunately I know of no shortcuts to eliminating problem type foods.  You just have to eliminate one at a time and see howe you feel.  It is painstaking but when you isolate a suspect food, it's well worth the effort.

 

Have your clinical issues resolved fully?  I mean, have you recently had a metabolic panel, etc done?  What does your doctor have to say?  If I were in your position I'd start with diagnostics through your doctor (metabolic panel, etc) to see what's going on presently and then go from there. Basically you'd want to rule out any clinical conditions that might show up in diagnostic testing first before doing anything else.

 

Have your doctor go over the result with you, one by one, and request a copy of the test results so you can further explore them on your own.  Many doctors are excellent diagnosticians but some are not.  You need to have confidence that your doctor is, but if in doubt, or he/she is unwilling to sit down with you or give you a copy of the results, find another doctor.

 

If you have a clean bill of health from your doctor, I'd consider a short water fast to reset your metabolic hormonal balance.  If you are already doing 16:8 eating schedule, your body is already acclimated to lowered insulin levels so going for a full 24 hour fast isn't going to be too hard.  Follow it with a 48 hour fast a few weeks later, and then finally a 72 hour fast when you feel up to that.

 

Unless you have a specific medical condition where fasting is directly contraindicated,  fasting up to 72 hours is entirely safe IMO, and it is a very potent way to quickly restore metabolic hormonal imbalances that could be the underlying cause of digestive issues or the inability to effectively lose fat under caloric deficits.  Science supports this notion, and my own personal experience at fasting confirms it.

 

I can only say that short-term fasting has worked quite well for me.  Typically I fast for 72 hours once a month or once every other month simply because I believe it keeps my metabolic health optimized.  After you acclimate to this kind of fasting, it's a walk in the park; no serious hunger or cravings, no ill effects at all, no loss of energy at all, and the difference in how you feel at the conclusion is immediate and quite profound.

 

I know it sounds simplistic but I really think of these kinds of fasts as a sort of "spring cleaning" that gets your metabolic health optimized.  What amazes me always is how quickly the benefits of fasting are felt.

 

As for inability to lose weight, I'm a firm believer that metabolic imbalances play a huge role!  If, for instance, your insulin / leptin balance is not optimal, you will have issues accessing stored body fat.  Short term water fasting restores such imbalances quickly and effectively in many cases.

 

Again, just want to emphasize that the starting point is a visit to your doctor for diagnostic tests. so you know where you are at presently.  

Edited by Kohsamida

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22 hours ago, Artisi said:

if you are undertaking a fast for betterment of your health, not some airy fairy nonsense - why would you put coffee into your system, as coffee - a stimulant  is the most abused drug in the world.

  

Disclaimer: this is not medical advice, just my understanding and what works for me.

 

Coffee is scientifically recognised as now being a health benefit  - (recent studies have generally found no connection between moderate consumption of coffee and an increased risk of heart disease or cancer) - when consumed as follows:

 

if water fasting, wait for the body to 'wake-up' in the morning before drinking coffee. In other words, don't drink coffee to wake up your body. That's best practice in any situation.

 

Instead, drink a glass of sugar-free electrolytes, first thing. A combination of a spoonful of cider vinegar, and a sprinkle of ginger, potassium salt, e.g. himalayan (the key ingredient), and freshly squeezed half a lemon or lime, and perhaps cayenne/chilli/turmeric sprinkling should not take you out of Ketosis, and/or Autophagy. 

 

The above works for me because my body has adapted to Ketosis, but bear in mind each person's reaction is different, and if any doubt, just add potassium salt to warm water with a teaspoon squeeze of lemon for flavour.

 

A couple of cups of caffeine coffee, drunk black, is best consumed around midday to early afternoon, but not later, or before bed, because it would most likely keep you awake. I don't drink Decaf, albeit it could benefit others who have an adverse reaction to caffeine. For example, I doubt 5-10 cups of coffee or more per day would be beneficial in the long-term.

 

As with most nutritious consumptions, moderation, e.g. alcohol and (diet) variation are key elements to longevity. I mention variation, because the human gut is overflowing with both good and bad bacteria, and - IMO - different foods keep the different types of 'good' working effectively in negating the 'bad'.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, stephenterry said:

Disclaimer: this is not medical advice, just my understanding and what works for me.

 

Coffee is scientifically recognised as now being a health benefit  - (recent studies have generally found no connection between moderate consumption of coffee and an increased risk of heart disease or cancer) - when consumed as follows:

 

if water fasting, wait for the body to 'wake-up' in the morning before drinking coffee. In other words, don't drink coffee to wake up your body. That's best practice in any situation.

 

Instead, drink a glass of sugar-free electrolytes, first thing. A combination of a spoonful of cider vinegar, and a sprinkle of ginger, potassium salt, e.g. himalayan (the key ingredient), and freshly squeezed half a lemon or lime, and perhaps cayenne/chilli/turmeric sprinkling should not take you out of Ketosis, and/or Autophagy. 

 

The above works for me because my body has adapted to Ketosis, but bear in mind each person's reaction is different, and if any doubt, just add potassium salt to warm water with a teaspoon squeeze of lemon for flavour.

 

A couple of cups of caffeine coffee, drunk black, is best consumed around midday to early afternoon, but not later, or before bed, because it would most likely keep you awake. I don't drink Decaf, albeit it could benefit others who have an adverse reaction to caffeine. For example, I doubt 5-10 cups of coffee or more per day would be beneficial in the long-term.

 

As with most nutritious consumptions, moderation, e.g. alcohol and (diet) variation are key elements to longevity. I mention variation, because the human gut is overflowing with both good and bad bacteria, and - IMO - different foods keep the different types of 'good' working effectively in negating the 'bad'.

 

Sounds good to me.  I'm not quite as regimented as you (though nothing wrong with doing it your way).  I sort of disagree about Himalayan salt being that important.  Just my personal view but I think salt is simply NaCl, and all the hype about Himalayan salt being special seems mostly to be marketing hype...but I may be wrong.

 

I use pre-packaged sports electrolyte mix (not necessarily for fasting but every day since I'm in this harsh Thai climate and am into outdoor endurance sports.  It's fairly cheap, tastes good, and won't kick you out of ketosis.  I just mix a packet into my water bottle and I'm good to go. 

 

Just want to point out that for short term water fasting (72 hours and under) electrolyte supplementation is really not essential IMO.  Excessive electrolyte excretion due to effects of ketosis only occurs once glycogen stores are depleted and insulin levels drop so really that does not occur until a short term fast is about to end. 

 

Further, most people who are fasting are fairly sedentary during the fast and avoid being outdoors under harsh conditions so excessive electrolytes loss from these sources is also not a factor in short-term fasting.  Doesn't hurt to use them during a fast, just not essential.  Beyond a 72 hour fast it is advisable to supplement just to avoid "keto flue" but even then a good multi-vitamin with minerals will protect you just fine.

 

I provide for salt needs just from regular use of table salt on foods.  Some of my outdoor mid-day workouts get pretty intense under a hot sun but I've never felt a need for salt supplementation, and excessive salt can have a seriously negative effect on blood pressure (at least for me).

 

For anyone interested, for a while I had extremely high blood pressure (180/120).  Cutting salt from my diet ( I was a huge fan of salt on everything, and in excessive amounts) brought my BP into the normal range in only a matter of days!  My doctor didn't provide that advice; instead he put me on Statins!  I had to figure this out for myself.  So...the moral is "take responsibility for your own health" and don't rely on others to do that for you...especially prescription-happy doctors!

 

[ Just my personal take on all of this; everyone should decide for themselves when it comes to their personal health and well being ].

 1405646026_snapshot_2019-07-11at10_30_05AM.jpg.a51f1f973301c1046279e4ee11df711f.jpg63487314_snapshot_2019-07-11at10_30_56AM.jpg.952c12345a9ca338cda630bda028d1b8.jpg

 

Edited by Kohsamida

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https://draxe.com/pink-himalayan-salt/

 

Well worth a read. Salt is salt but some are more healthier than others. Certainly high percentages of sodium can increase blood pressure, and in my case I only take less than a teaspoon of the potassium rich sources like Himalayan salt once a day.

 

As for the electrolyte mix, it's a US Drug company processed package full of chemicals and ambiguous contents statements, albeit professed to contain high levels of potassium and magnesium, and zero sodium. Nevertheless, I shall continue to mix my own from natural ingredients, for the simple rationale that my mix is (as far as it can be ascertained) natural. 

 

Rule of thumb. Never trust drug companies to divulge any health risk aspect because it's a multi-trillion industry supported by the medical practitioners who earn a superlative income by prescribing the drug companies' products to the uninformed masses.

 

 

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3 minutes ago, stephenterry said:

https://draxe.com/pink-himalayan-salt/

 

Well worth a read. Salt is salt but some are more healthier than others. Certainly high percentages of sodium can increase blood pressure, and in my case I only take less than a teaspoon of the potassium rich sources like Himalayan salt once a day.

 

As for the electrolyte mix, it's a US Drug company processed package full of chemicals and ambiguous contents statements, albeit professed to contain high levels of potassium and magnesium, and zero sodium. Nevertheless, I shall continue to mix my own from natural ingredients, for the simple rationale that my mix is (as far as it can be ascertained) natural. 

 

Rule of thumb. Never trust drug companies to divulge any health risk aspect because it's a multi-trillion industry supported by the medical practitioners who earn a superlative income by prescribing the drug companies' products to the uninformed masses.

You make a good point about drug companies being selective about what they divulge.  However, I've been using this product for a long time and it was recommended by a lot of other athletes I know so I'm comfortable with it.  Of course, making your own from scratch is preferable but I'm too lazy for that LOL!

 

I should point out something I didn't mention re salt needs in previous post because I don;t want to lead people astray.  I do in fact supplement with salt after a particularly brutal workout or competitive event when I know in no uncertain terms I've lost significant NaCl but it's rare I get in that state.  For a normal workout, I don't bother.  Just didn't want people to think NaCl supplementation is unnecessary under extreme conditions, but the conditions most weekend athletes experience are not really that extreme IMO. 

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3 hours ago, stephenterry said:

... https://draxe.com/pink-himalayan-salt/   Well worth a read. ...

My problem with these alternatives to regular table salt is that there is really no scientific evidence that they are any better than regular (inexpensive) table salt.  If there were definitive and reputable studies, I'm sure promotors would make that clear, but they don't.  Instead they just use a lot of superlatives and imply unsubstantiated health benefits as your article pointed out like these:

852808249_snapshot_2019-07-11at3_11_52PM.jpg.c4a6467555580e629af3461e17a09d59.jpg

That just seems plain silly to me that Himalayan salt is going to boost libido LOL!  And these other claims of their superiority seem pretty far fetched and quite unprovable.

 

Perhaps they contain more minerals than regular table salt but I can get those same minerals far cheaper from a multi-vitamin supplement that contains minerals. 

 

The only health reason to use salt is for the sodium and for the taste IMO, and also for the trace amount of iodine (which is actually quite important, and which is not even contained in most alternative salts like Himalayan or Celtic types).

 

The real bottom line is cost.  There's no reason that these alternative salts should be priced so exorbitantly high except for the fact that the marketing hype makes them seem far more desirable than they really are.

 

Just my opinion.  I'm no expert on salt but I get very suspicious of things like this.

Edited by Kohsamida

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55 minutes ago, Kohsamida said:

My problem with these alternatives to regular table salt is that there is really no scientific evidence that they are any better than regular (inexpensive) table salt.  If there were definitive and reputable studies, I'm sure promotors would make that clear, but they don't.  Instead they just use a lot of superlatives and imply unsubstantiated health benefits as your article pointed out like these:

852808249_snapshot_2019-07-11at3_11_52PM.jpg.c4a6467555580e629af3461e17a09d59.jpg

That just seems plain silly to me that Himalayan salt is going to boost libido LOL!  And these other claims of their superiority seem pretty far fetched and quite unprovable.

 

Perhaps they contain more minerals than regular table salt but I can get those same minerals far cheaper from a multi-vitamin supplement that contains minerals. 

 

The only health reason to use salt is for the sodium and for the taste IMO, and also for the trace amount of iodine (which is actually quite important, and which is not even contained in most alternative salts like Himalayan or Celtic types).

 

The real bottom line is cost.  There's no reason that these alternative salts should be priced so exorbitantly high except for the fact that the marketing hype makes them seem far more desirable than they really are.

 

Just my opinion.  I'm no expert on salt but I get very suspicious of things like this.

Look at it this way. Clearly, table salt is high sodium, a processed item, and raises blood pressure. That, in itself, is damaging enough to avoid table salt - whatever the relative costs.  This is another example of marketing processed, versus natural. I suggest readers get into the mind set that 'processed anything' only supports the food and meds industry, not the consumer. It's a scandal as great as the tobacco industry, IMO. 

 

As a rule of thumb I try and avoid anything with a contents label stuck on it - if there is a natural alternative. 

 

Any other salt that contains less sodium and some potassium, and a smidgeon of other minerals must be a better health bet in the long-term - or even have short-term benefits that sodium salt doesn't. As with most consumption, moderation is key.

 

BTW Foods rich in iodine include seaweed -ugh, unprocessed dairy, tuna, shrimp and eggs. All 'natural'. 

 

If I was to clean my colon and relieve/re-adjust a constipated body, I'd use a 'healthy salt' flush, comprising of two teaspoons of potassium rich salt mixed thoroughly to dissolve in a one liter glass of room-temperature warm water with added lemon juice first thing after waking, and consuming in a five minute window.

 

I wouldn't stray far from the toilet in the next two hours whilst the flush worked its way through the body and flushed out bodily waste. As a one-off cleanser, it's natural, efficient, healthy and safe.    

 

 

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5 hours ago, stephenterry said:

Look at it this way. Clearly, table salt is high sodium, a processed item, and raises blood pressure. That, in itself, is damaging enough to avoid table salt - whatever the relative costs.  This is another example of marketing processed, versus natural. I suggest readers get into the mind set that 'processed anything' only supports the food and meds industry, not the consumer. It's a scandal as great as the tobacco industry, IMO. 

 

As a rule of thumb I try and avoid anything with a contents label stuck on it - if there is a natural alternative. 

 

Any other salt that contains less sodium and some potassium, and a smidgeon of other minerals must be a better health bet in the long-term - or even have short-term benefits that sodium salt doesn't. As with most consumption, moderation is key.

 

BTW Foods rich in iodine include seaweed -ugh, unprocessed dairy, tuna, shrimp and eggs. All 'natural'. 

 

If I was to clean my colon and relieve/re-adjust a constipated body, I'd use a 'healthy salt' flush, comprising of two teaspoons of potassium rich salt mixed thoroughly to dissolve in a one liter glass of room-temperature warm water with added lemon juice first thing after waking, and consuming in a five minute window.

 

I wouldn't stray far from the toilet in the next two hours whilst the flush worked its way through the body and flushed out bodily waste. As a one-off cleanser, it's natural, efficient, healthy and safe.    

 

 

To be honest, I never gave it much thought before but considering the fact that table salt is actually stripped of potassium and unprocessed salts such as Himalayan or Celtic are not, I guess it does in fact make sense to use an unprocessed salt, just to assure potassium / sodium balance is maintained in the body...Learn something new every day🙂.  Thanks for pointing that out.

 

Edited by Kohsamida

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Haven't been around in a while.  Glad to see this thread is alive and well, but it would be nice if posts were more related to do water-fasting.  Still though, no worries.  All is good 🙂.

 

Personally, what I'm really interested in (and why I started this thread) is to hear from people who fast not merely as a way to lose weight, but for optimizing their health and well-being.  There's so much underlying science to this and so few people who actually acknowledge that.

 

Edited by WaveHunter

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1 hour ago, WaveHunter said:

Haven't been around in a while.  Glad to see this thread is alive and well, but it would be nice if posts were more related to do water-fasting.  Still though, no worries.  All is good 🙂.

 

Personally, what I'm really interested in (and why I started this thread) is to hear from people who fast not merely as a way to lose weight, but for optimizing their health and well-being.  There's so much underlying science to this and so few people who actually acknowledge that.

 

 

I'm a water faster who has lost weight - from 85 kilos down to 72 over an 18 month period - and now maintain a healthy nutrition regime using OMAD, and a 20-4 window. I find a 20 hour fasting period keeps me in Ketosis, and allows me to build muscle using HIIT while burning fat. Or, so I believe!

 

It's also useful to explore ways and means for optimizing health and well-being as you point out, so my post deviance on this topic, e.g. the smoking and salt discussion has been addressing a couple of these aspects, which I hope would be useful to new water-fasting readers. 

 

If it's okay, I would be willing to post on the health benefits of alcohol, especially red wine, which is a taboo subject for health authorities, but should be taken on board by readers on this topic if longevity is an objective... 

 

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2 hours ago, stephenterry said:

 

I'm a water faster who has lost weight - from 85 kilos down to 72 over an 18 month period - and now maintain a healthy nutrition regime using OMAD, and a 20-4 window. I find a 20 hour fasting period keeps me in Ketosis, and allows me to build muscle using HIIT while burning fat. Or, so I believe!

 

It's also useful to explore ways and means for optimizing health and well-being as you point out, so my post deviance on this topic, e.g. the smoking and salt discussion has been addressing a couple of these aspects, which I hope would be useful to new water-fasting readers. 

 

If it's okay, I would be willing to post on the health benefits of alcohol, especially red wine, which is a taboo subject for health authorities, but should be taken on board by readers on this topic if longevity is an objective... 

 

Cool.  Sounds like you have a pretty good idea of what fasting can really do for one's long-term health.  I also embrace the idea of 'eating windows"  I originally was pretty happy with One_meal-A-Day but lately I've opened it up more like 16 hours of fasting with a 8 hour eating window.  My body react better to 2 meals a day.  I think it's a subjective thing that every person needs to experiment with to find what's best for them.

 

I think it's safe to say that everyone can benefit by reducing meal frequency and snacking so that the insulin levels do not remain continually elevated which is what happens when people "graze" on food from the moment they awake to the moment they go to bed.  Our bodies are not built to deal with that.  Obesity is the result, and most people then turn to caloric restriction diets to deal with that, and obviously most of those kinds of diets simply do not work because they are just a temporary fix.

 

Caloric restriction is not the answer.  Nutritional lifestyle changes such as reducing junky carbohydrates found in processed foods, avoiding food-grazing (intermittent fasting) and optimizing the way our bodies metabolize food (which is what fasting trains the body to do) are the real keys IMHO.

 

Anyway, that's the strategy that works for me, and for many others who embrace some form of intermittent or periodic fasting.  There's nothing magical or convoluted about it.  It's all firmly based in science.  It may not be right for everyone but following the status-quo of most caloric-restriction diets certainly does not work so I think everyone who has trouble loosing weight or suffers from other metabolic syndromes should consider this with an open mind.

 

I hope you (and everyone else) will post their thoughts on anything that they feel might be is important to metabolic health.  Nutrition (based on real science) is such an important topic but there's so much misinformation out there. 

 

It's true that nothing is etched in stone when it comes to nutrition, but discussing and debating is a great way to get closer to the truth for us all.  In the end, it's really each person's responsibility to decide for themselves what's best for them, rather than blindly follow the advice of others (and that can even includes your own doctor since many have very poor education when it comes to nutrition) .  Hopefully this thread can help facilitate that.

Edited by WaveHunter

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