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BANGKOK 25 June 2019 18:29
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Italian expat faces recklessness causing death charge over fatal boat collision

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1 hour ago, 5633572526 said:

A small wooden boat sitting low in the water would probably not show up on radar if that is the instrument you are referring to. 

 

On shore, where this occured, it would be in breach of maritime law to rely on anything other than eyes and ears.

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3 hours ago, whaleboneman said:

Why is the damage on the port aft then?

 

Did I phrase that wrongly?  The boat was coming from the starboard, the direction maritime law states you must yield to, of course a collision with a boat coming from the starboard would be hit on its port side.

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, LawrenceN said:

I see two possibilities: 1) The reporter inaccurately called it a longtail; 2) The editor stuck in a stock photo of a little Thai boat. Or both. We don't really know if the photo shows the actual boat involved in the accident. I don't see much damage. Does anybody have better info from previous reliable reports?

 

I expect it was the former as a lot of people say longtail for kolae's regardless of whether they have been turned into longtails or not.

 

As for you not being able to see damage, did you notice that its underwater?  I expect the larger boat went over the top of it.

Edited by Kieran00001

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2 hours ago, Pattaya46 said:

Here is another one :

1555223948_4645.jpg

 

 

Well done, clearly a rowboat with raised rowlocks and nowhere large enough for an engine nor a broken engine mount.

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Well done, clearly a rowboat with raised rowlocks and nowhere large enough for an engine nor a broken engine mount.


The rectangular blue thing in the photo is the secret underwater engine compartment.

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2 minutes ago, mogandave said:

 


The rectangular blue thing in the photo is the secret underwater engine compartment.

 

 

That's exactly right, its known as the pond skater, the modern version of the seagull, so small and light it doesn't break the surface tension of the wated.

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If you can't do the time, don't do the crime.

 

No one "needs" to be driving a boat for "pleasure".

 

He wasn't fishing for food.

 

He wasn't going from Point A to Point B for transportation.

 

Another rich idiot who thinks he's superior to locals.

 

LOOK AT ME!  I'M ON A BOAT!  I'M RICHER THAN YOU.

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, Kieran00001 said:

 

Dragon boats ars traditional Chinese boats however they are now found throughout the world, I believe they are an olympic event, but they also have zero relavance to this topic. 

 

The boats I am talking about are calked kolae boats and originate in Thailand and Malaysia, they are not from Isaan though, they are from the south.  The extended rowlocks seen on some, such as the one in this accident, allows rowing while standing.

aam-aaes32985.jpg.4acfe46cdc8bf9c3f8d3fc14cf27d9cf.jpg

S__4415496.jpg

 

 

To be honest, the "kolae" looks substantially different to the "prowed" boat in the picture above. I would also suggest that the kolae looks more like a craft that would be used in forest rivers collecting firewood rather than at sea collecting the oceans' bounty!

 

And I only put in the photos and narrative re the "dragon boats" to let you know that I have been to other parts of Thailand rather than just the "tourist traps" However, as I have only been to the South of Thailand once on a visa run, and am in no hurry to get back, that would possibly explain why I have never seen a kolae! 

 

And to save you the trouble of further explanation of maritime facts and fiction (e.g. the difference between a boat and a ship etc) I suggest that this discussion has run its course (in much the same way as a young man was found dead in his car on Koh Samui, and there were more posts arguing what type of car he was in than the reasons for his death!), so let's get back on topic, and RIP to the old man - regardless of whose fault it was, at that age he didn't deserve to go that way.

 

Edited by sambum

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That's exactly right, its known as the pond skater, the modern version of the seagull, so small and light it doesn't break the surface tension of the wated.


And because it uses a hydrogen cell, there are no exhaust bubbles...

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If you can't do the time, don't do the crime.
 
No one "needs" to be driving a boat for "pleasure".
 
He wasn't fishing for food.
 
He wasn't going from Point A to Point B for transportation.
 
Another rich idiot who thinks he's superior to locals.
 
LOOK AT ME!  I'M ON A BOAT!  I'M RICHER THAN YOU.


So you always wanted a boat and could never afford one?
  • Haha 1

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21 minutes ago, sambum said:

S__4415496.jpg

 

 

To be honest, the "kolae" looks substantially different to the "prowed" boat in the picture above. I would also suggest that the kolae looks more like a craft that would be used in forest rivers collecting firewood rather than at sea collecting the oceans' bounty!

 

And I only put in the photos and narrative re the "dragon boats" to let you know that I have been to other parts of Thailand rather than just the "tourist traps" However, as I have only been to the South of Thailand once on a visa run, and am in no hurry to get back, that would possibly explain why I have never seen a kolae! 

 

And to save you the trouble of further explanation of maritime facts and fiction (e.g. the difference between a boat and a ship etc) I suggest that this discussion has run its course (in much the same way as a young man was found dead in his car on Koh Samui, and there were more posts arguing what type of car he was in than the reasons for his death!), so let's get back on topic, and RIP to the old man - regardless of whose fault it was, at that age he didn't deserve to go that way.

 

 

Both the same category of boat, and by the way, that is the sea, you can tell by the type of tree, which only grow in salt waters.

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12 minutes ago, mogandave said:

 


So you always wanted a boat and could never afford one?

 

 

Desperate much?

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Desperate much?


Methinks dude could use a little break...
  • Haha 1

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On 5/9/2019 at 9:26 PM, madmen said:

What instruments will detect a wooden boat and send out a screaming alarm ? you cant be serious there is no such thing or the mega ships would be using them instead of running over small boats in shipping lanes

Do you think that the Thai fisherman had a megaphone or loudspeakers and a mike on his longtail boat?

 

   

  • Haha 1

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Posted (edited)
23 minutes ago, Benroon said:

Right ok so I've asked you twice for a scenario where the little wooden rowing boat could be to blame - have I missed the reply?

 

Or just perhaps he had a power breakfast that morning, guzzled a few protein shakes down and in a fit of pique rowed his little wooden boat with such ferocity into a reinforced fibre glass power boat that he died of the injuries ?

 

Over to you detective

I am not sure about what maritime law says, but the only case the little boat could be at fault, is IF the accident happened in the night... And there was not any light on the small boat.

Edited by mauGR1
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