Jump to content
BANGKOK 22 May 2019 09:36
Sign in to follow this  
webfact

Thai biryani flavour tweaked to appeal to Chinese taste buds

Recommended Posts

Thai biryani flavour tweaked to appeal to Chinese taste buds

By JINTANA PANYAARVUDH 
THE NATION 
PATTANI

 

a727ab2789a564c116ffa1dabb64cf12.jpeg

Muhammad Hajeeamsah display biryani at his shop in Pattani's Muang district.

 

After two years of research, ‘Khao Mok’is ready to woo Kunming natives.
 

IN FURTHER proof that Thailand’s cuisine is a world-beater, Thai researchers have hatched plans to export the recipe for Thai biryani or Khao Mok to China after completing a project to develop local cuisine in the far South. 

 

Titled “Development of Potential of Thai Foods Innovation Using Ingredients from the Southern Border Provinces for the Chinese Market”, the study aimed to tap the distinctive flavours of far South cuisine in a bid to tease Chinese taste buds, research leader Wanasnan Kanokpattanangkul said.

 

Though there is already a Chinese influence in the three southernmost provinces due to the ethnic-Chinese minority living there, the cuisine in the South is very different from anything available in China, Wanasnan said. Wanasnan normally works as a chef, holding Thai cooking classes in China’s Kunming city. 

 

The study was completed last year and funded jointly by the Thailand Research Fund (TRF) and Southern Border Provinces Administration Centre (SBPAC) to promote development in Pattani, Yala and Narathiwat provinces. 

 

During the two years of research, the team sought local ingredients and developed recipes for Chinese sample groups to taste, before deciding on khao mok as the best fit for Chinese palates. 

 

Khao mok is an aromatic, well-seasoned one-pot dish hailing originally from India. The most popular version is khao mok kai, or curried chicken (or sometimes goat) cooked in spiced rice. 

 

“We chose this recipe because the rice is yellow, an auspicious colour for Chinese people, and it was the most popular among the tasting group,” the researcher said. 

 

The team plans to market the dish under the brand “Papa Tagu”, which will cost each franchise in Kunming about Bt3 million to launch, she added. 

 

The capital of China’s Yunnan province was chosen as the launch pad for the Thai version of biryani because there are many Thai-Muslims living there, Wanasnan said. 

 

The business idea stems from a memorandum of understanding signed by SBPAC and a Thai-Chinese business association to develop Thai recipes for commercial use. They are waiting for approval from both Thai and Chinese import and export regulators. 

 

The “Papa Tagu” brand was named after the shop “De Tagu” in Pattani’s Muang district, whose owner Muhammad Hajeeamsah, a researcher in the team, played a major role in creating the recipe.

 

Muhammad quit his job as a lecturer to open his khao mok shop three years ago, where he serves a less spicy version of biryani. He has also produced a sauce to go with the dish. 

 

As a researcher, he spent seven months adjusting the recipe to appeal to the Chinese palate. Unlike khao mok, his version looks much like the original version of biryani, in that the rice is white, orange, yellow and saffron in colour. 

 

“My secret is that I cook it slowly using good-quality ingredients,” said the 42-year-old lecturer turned chef. The dish needs three hours on the stove before its ready. 

 

“I call my recipe the ‘rice of peace’, as people from different cultures will feel happy eating it,” he added. 

 

The spice powder he uses in the dish has already been introduced to the Chinese market, and Wanasnan has been using it in her cooking classes in China. 

 

Kitti Satjawattana, director of TRF’s collaborative research unit, said further development of local cuisine for export to China, where the market is huge, would help boost the quality of life and earnings for villagers in the far South. 

 

Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/national/30369252

 

thenation_logo.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh dear !!...next step will be my favorite Indian Restaurant making a Tandoori Chop suey or jeera rice with chicken soya curry !!...please don't brand away culinary identity just for a bunch of spoilt chinese...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, observer90210 said:

Oh dear !!...next step will be my favorite Indian Restaurant making a Tandoori Chop suey or jeera rice with chicken soya curry !!...please don't brand away culinary identity just for a bunch of spoilt chinese...

So what. Common in the food industry. Its all fusion.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You are so right in your theory of fusion,  that sounds like putting crushed ice and soda in a Chateau St Emilion Grand Cru (1998) 😂

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, observer90210 said:

Oh dear !!...next step will be my favorite Indian Restaurant making a Tandoori Chop suey or jeera rice with chicken soya curry !!...please don't brand away culinary identity just for a bunch of spoilt chinese...

Culinary identity? Wait, they are already experimenting with Thai som tam Sauerkraut 

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Biryani, although originally thought to be from India, is also very popular in the Arabic world where’s is a rice dish mixed with meat. It’s been fused as it travels and so the Thai version is just another fusion.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love chicken biryani. Yummy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, tifino said:

pretty weird... thais trying to coax chinese, to eat indian

I can see TAT advertising now, Come to Thailand for authentic Indian cuisine :whistling:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

is there some secret hint from the thais, that the briyani rice itself now comes from LOS too?

 

 Briyani can only be called such, if it is actually grown in the specific Indian valley.

(Just like Champagne can only be called such if comes from those specific plantationsin France)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...