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BANGKOK 16 July 2019 03:02
mrbojangles

Changes to Football Laws of the game

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On 5/21/2019 at 11:10 AM, wgdanson said:

Yep, some other rules could be implemented instead of these petty ones.

 

ONLY the captain and the player involved should talk to the ref. Other players stay 10 yards/metres away and keep gobs shut.

 

Throw-ins taken within say 2 metres of where the ball went out.

 

 

Those rules are already in place , just the teams Captain and the player involved can talk to th Ref about a decision and throw-ins should be taken from the exact spot where the ball went out , those are already rules

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17 minutes ago, sanemax said:

Those rules are already in place , just the teams Captain and the player involved can talk to the Ref about a decision and throw-ins should be taken from the exact spot where the ball went out , those are already rules

Not quite - the law does indeed say that throw-ins should be taken from where the ball crossed the line but there is no provision in the laws that allows the captain or anyone else to discuss decisions with the referee.

 

22 minutes ago, sanemax said:

players also get a yellow card themselves if they wave an imaginary yellow card in the air , suggesting the ref books a player

There's no such law. A referee could, if they wished, choose to caution a player for this, either by treating it as dissent or under the 'catch-all' provision of unsporting behaviour for "showing a lack of respect for the game" - but it's not an automatic yellow card.

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Posted (edited)
On 5/23/2019 at 7:15 PM, BangrakBob said:

I can't understand why this article, along with others I've seen, have mis-read the penalty law changes in a way that makes them think the goalkeeper is no longer allowed to move when a penalty is being taken. There is no such amendment.

 

Here is the full wording of the relevant sections of the new law 14:

 

Quote

The defending goalkeeper must remain on the goal line, facing the kicker, between the goalposts, without touching the goalposts, crossbar or goal net, until the ball has been kicked. 
(…) 
When the ball is kicked, the defending goalkeeper must have at least part of one foot touching, or in line with, the goal line.

Absolutely nothing there prohibits the goalkeeper from moving.

 

In fact, the 'Explanation' section of the amendment makes it clear that the goalkeeper is actually allowed to take a step off the line and/or start to jump before the ball is kicked, as follows:

 

"Allowing the goalkeeper to have only one foot touching the goal line (or, if jumping, in line with the goal line) when the penalty kick is taken is a more practical approach as it is easier to identify if both feet are not on the line. As the kicker can ‘stutter’ in the run, it is reasonable that the goalkeeper can take one step in anticipation of the kick."

Edited by GroveHillWanderer

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3 minutes ago, GroveHillWanderer said:

I can't understand why this article, along with others I've seen, have mis-read the penalty law changes in a way that makes them think the goalkeeper is no longer allowed to move when a penalty is being taken. There is no such amendment.

 

Here is the full wording of the relevant sections of the new law 14:

 

Absolutely nothing there prohibits the goalkeeper from moving.

Yeah I notice that misinterpretation. I like the idea that they cannot start swing the cross bar up and down.

 

And as far as I know the goalkeeper not being allowed to move forward off his line until the ball was kicked was always a rule, but in recent times has just been ignored. 

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2 minutes ago, BangrakBob said:

Yeah I notice that misinterpretation. I like the idea that they cannot start swing the cross bar up and down.

 

And as far as I know the goalkeeper not being allowed to move forward off his line until the ball was kicked was always a rule, but in recent times has just been ignored. 

Well, as I say (although I was still editing it when you responded) the keeper is now officially allowed to take a step off the line or start to jump, so long as one foot is still on the line. The old law said both feet had to be on the line. So again, although this allows the goalkeeper more leeway to move, several articles I've read, have misinterpreted the change as a crack-down on keepers moving off the line at penalties. It is in fact the opposite.

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10 minutes ago, GroveHillWanderer said:

Not quite - the law does indeed say that throw-ins should be taken from where the ball crossed the line but there is no provision in the laws that allows the captain or anyone else to discuss decisions with the referee.

 

There's no such law. A referee could, if they wished, choose to caution a player for this, either by treating it as dissent or under the 'catch-all' provision of unsporting behaviour for "showing a lack of respect for the game" - but it's not an automatic yellow card.

Although there may not be a specific law against waving imaginary yellow cars around , it falls under the "ungentlemanly conduct" laws and thus is indeed a yellow card offence in itself .

  Of course the Ref can talk to any player and any player can talk to the Ref , but when a ref is speaking to a certain player about a certain issue , just the Captain is allowed to be part of the discussion and the Ref usually just waves any other players away .

   If a player continues interfering , it is indeed a yellow card offence , but the player usually walks away before getting a yellow

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34 minutes ago, sanemax said:

it falls under the "ungentlemanly conduct" laws and thus is indeed a yellow card offence in itself .

  Of course the Ref can talk to any player and any player can talk to the Ref , but when a ref is speaking to a certain player about a certain issue , just the Captain is allowed to be part of the discussion

Sorry, you're mischaracterising what the laws say again. Firstly, there is no such thing as "ungentlemanly conduct." There is "unsporting behaviour" and under the list of things that are classified as unsporting behaviour (on page 106 of the Laws of the Game, 2018/19 edition, pdf version) waving an imaginary card is not mentioned, so it is not "a yellow card offence in itself." As I said, the referee can choose to see it as an action that "shows a lack of respect for the game" - which is included on page 106 - but that is purely up to each individual referee. Based on my experience and observation, most referees turn a blind eye to this.

 

Also, the captain is not "allowed to be part of the discussion" according to anything in the laws. Here's what the laws say about the captain (page 52, ibid.):

 

Quote

The team captain has no special status or privileges but has a degree of responsibility for the behaviour of the team.

Now, there is a widely-accepted convention whereby most referees do talk to the captain but that is just a habit that they have gotten into and it's not part of the laws.

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1 hour ago, GroveHillWanderer said:

Sorry, you're mischaracterising what the laws say again. Firstly, there is no such thing as "ungentlemanly conduct." There is "unsporting behaviour" and under the list of things that are classified as unsporting behaviour (on page 106 of the Laws of the Game, 2018/19 edition, pdf version) waving an imaginary card is not mentioned, so it is not "a yellow card offence in itself." As I said, the referee can choose to see it as an action that "shows a lack of respect for the game" - which is included on page 106 - but that is purely up to each individual referee. Based on my experience and observation, most referees turn a blind eye to this.

 

Also, the captain is not "allowed to be part of the discussion" according to anything in the laws. Here's what the laws say about the captain (page 52, ibid.):

 

Now, there is a widely-accepted convention whereby most referees do talk to the captain but that is just a habit that they have gotten into and it's not part of the laws.

 

Uefa has ruled that any player who waves an imaginary card in an attempt to get an opponent booked will be cautioned themselves.

 

Referees have also been ordered to clamp down on dissent and book at least one player should they be surrounded by a protesting group.

 

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport2/hi/football/5306148.stm

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