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Concerns over Chiang Mai coal project are ‘logically sound’, says engineering academic

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Concerns over Chiang Mai coal project are ‘logically sound’, says engineering academic

By PRATCH RUJIVANAROM 
THE NATION

 

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Photo from: Too Young to Die's Facebook

 

AN ENGINEERING ACADEMIC has raised concerns about the potentially serious environmental impacts of an open coal mine planned for Chiang Mai’s Omkoi district.

 

The Primary Industries and Mines Department has already given assurances that the project must first be subjected to public hearings and an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA), but residents of Omkoi this week voiced opposition to opening a coal mine in what is currently forestland.

 

Sate Sampattagul, a lecturer in mechanical engineering at Chiang Mai University, said public concerns about the project were logically sound. Even if proper environmental measures were implemented, he said, the mining activity would likely cause multiple environmental issues in the future, he said.

 

Among potential problems are a major loss of forestland and biodiversity, air pollution and high greenhouse-gas emissions caused by extracting and burning coal, Sate noted.

 

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Photo from: Somlak Hutanuwatr's Facebook

 

“The details haven’t yet been made publicly clear, so I can’t properly predict how serious the environmental impacts will be,” he said. “But coal mining is generally considered quite harmful for both the environment and people’s health.

 

“Even if the project owners have good mining practices and pollution-control standards, opening a coal mine in the forest will surely cause some deforestation and would lead to degradation of the environment and ecosystem.”

 

He said the mining activity would contribute more air pollution in an area already suffering from seasonal smog. Dust and the exhaust from mining machines would worsen air quality and, if the mine were high on a mountain, the area affected by air pollution would be even wider.

 

“The air pollution from coal mining will be much more harmful to people’s health than wildfire smoke, because it contains several toxic substances that could severely endanger health,” Sate stressed.

 

“Moreover, the extraction and burning of coal will emit a large volume of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, contributing to climate change, and end up causing global harm to the environment and people’s wellbeing.”

 

 Charukit Ketkaew, director of Primary Industries and Mines Office 3 in Chiang Mai, said the project proponent was currently applying for a coal-mining concession. Approval would not be granted without a public hearing, an EIA, and permission secured from several state agencies.

 

“I know coal mining is seen as quite negative in the public’s mind, so I understand why the local people are concerned,” he said. 

 

“But I assure you that the proposal must first pass several processes in order to guarantee that the operation would have the least impact on the environment and the people before they can begin their project.”

 

Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/national/30369911

 

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Oh yes, Bad Coal, great Nuke power! Justbask India!  Hah.

   Green people! How lovely..

Geezer

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3 minutes ago, Sealbash said:


Because if you do research into the overall carbon footprint of mining materials, manufacturing components, maintenance, of sufficient renewable energy components to satisfy electricity demand, it is not only more economical, but also less environmentally damaging to use coal or fossil fuels for power generation.


Sent from my iPhone using Thailand Forum - Thaivisa mobile app

Not sure Greta would agree with you.

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1 hour ago, Sealbash said:


Because if you do research into the overall carbon footprint of mining materials, manufacturing components, maintenance, of sufficient renewable energy components to satisfy electricity demand, it is not only more economical, but also less environmentally damaging to use coal or fossil fuels for power generation.


Sent from my iPhone using Thailand Forum - Thaivisa mobile app

Can you recommend a reliable source for what you claim? Not disputing, just asking.

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2 hours ago, Krataiboy said:

Can you recommend a reliable source for what you claim? Not disputing, just asking.

There's a problem in defining what a reliable source is. Those who as skeptical about the claimed disastrous effects of rising CO2 levels, will tend to argue that such sites that are promoting the alarm are not reliable.

 

Likewise, those sites that express certainty that CO2 is the main driver of the current warming period, and that any warming will be bad, will not be considered reliable by the skeptics.

 

However, there does seem to be a genuine problem regarding the environmental pollution caused by the mining and processing of metals necessary for the construction of renewable energy devices such as solar panels and Lithium batteries.

 

Here are a few sites which address the problem.

https://www.wired.co.uk/article/lithium-batteries-environment-impact

 

"Two other key ingredients, cobalt and nickel, are more in danger of creating a bottleneck in the move towards electric vehicles, and at a potentially huge environmental cost.
Unlike most metals, which are not toxic when they’re pulled from the ground as metal ores, cobalt is “uniquely terrible,” according to Gleb Yushin, chief technical officer and founder of battery materials company Sila Nanotechnologies."

 

https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2017/11/battery-batteries-electric-cars-carbon-sustainable-power-energy/

 

"Batteries powering electric vehicles are forecast to make up 90% of the lithium-ion battery market by 2025. They are the main reason why electric vehicles can generate more carbon emissions over their lifecycle – from procurement of raw materials to manufacturing, use and recycling – than petrol or diesel cars."

 

https://www.greentechmedia.com/articles/read/lithium-ion-battery-production-is-surging-but-at-what-cost#gs.dgotd8

 

"Though an explosion in EVs and energy storage will allow countries to rely on less carbon-intensive energy, the extraction of essential ingredients to make cost-effective lithium-ion batteries generally leaves environmental and human devastation in its wake."

 

https://www.rac.co.uk/drive/advice/emissions/are-electric-cars-actually-worse-for-the-environment/

 

"Locally, there's little doubt that electric cars will help to make our towns and cities cleaner, quieter and more pleasant. Nationally and internationally, the pressure to extract raw materials, the energy used in car production, and the source of electricity combine to rob the electric car of its holier-than-thou status."

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5 hours ago, VincentRJ said:

There's a problem in defining what a reliable source is. Those who as skeptical about the claimed disastrous effects of rising CO2 levels, will tend to argue that such sites that are promoting the alarm are not reliable.

 

Likewise, those sites that express certainty that CO2 is the main driver of the current warming period, and that any warming will be bad, will not be considered reliable by the skeptics.

 

However, there does seem to be a genuine problem regarding the environmental pollution caused by the mining and processing of metals necessary for the construction of renewable energy devices such as solar panels and Lithium batteries.

 

Here are a few sites which address the problem.

https://www.wired.co.uk/article/lithium-batteries-environment-impact

 

"Two other key ingredients, cobalt and nickel, are more in danger of creating a bottleneck in the move towards electric vehicles, and at a potentially huge environmental cost.
Unlike most metals, which are not toxic when they’re pulled from the ground as metal ores, cobalt is “uniquely terrible,” according to Gleb Yushin, chief technical officer and founder of battery materials company Sila Nanotechnologies."

 

https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2017/11/battery-batteries-electric-cars-carbon-sustainable-power-energy/

 

"Batteries powering electric vehicles are forecast to make up 90% of the lithium-ion battery market by 2025. They are the main reason why electric vehicles can generate more carbon emissions over their lifecycle – from procurement of raw materials to manufacturing, use and recycling – than petrol or diesel cars."

 

https://www.greentechmedia.com/articles/read/lithium-ion-battery-production-is-surging-but-at-what-cost#gs.dgotd8

 

"Though an explosion in EVs and energy storage will allow countries to rely on less carbon-intensive energy, the extraction of essential ingredients to make cost-effective lithium-ion batteries generally leaves environmental and human devastation in its wake."

 

https://www.rac.co.uk/drive/advice/emissions/are-electric-cars-actually-worse-for-the-environment/

 

"Locally, there's little doubt that electric cars will help to make our towns and cities cleaner, quieter and more pleasant. Nationally and internationally, the pressure to extract raw materials, the energy used in car production, and the source of electricity combine to rob the electric car of its holier-than-thou status."

Thanks a bunch for the thoughtful input and references. Will do some new digging.

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