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Public warned as huge chemical fire breaks out at Laem Chabang port

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21 minutes ago, hotchilli said:

You're not an important person.... no offence intended, I'm generalising

From the original story, "Local people were evacuated."

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2 hours ago, Briggsy said:

It is still going on. There is a thick plume of pale grey ash (?) still hanging over the ship and visible from miles away.

You're not in Bangkok anymore? Maybe less pollution there. 

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3 hours ago, apalink_thailand said:

It would help if people spent 5 minutes actually reading an MSDS. They might then have a clue (1) how to pack it and store it (2) how to protect from human exposure and what the effects and 1st aid will be (3) how to put out a fire in this chemical (4) how to protect the local environment (waterways). But no....reading it is not important.

Quote

"It was a chemical fire and resulted in noxious fumes and particles being emitted into the air over a wide area. 

What chemical it was was not known."

What would help even more would be determining what the chemical is so that someone can look up the associated MSDS (or SDS).

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1 minute ago, bubba said:

What would help even more would be determining what the chemical is so that someone can look up the associated MSDS (or SDS).

Assuming the cargo manifests are correct they will know the chemical-or should. The problem arise when what is contained is not what has been declared. Whilst customs officers elsewhere are quite good I suspect that if that container was due for offloading/Loading, the article didn't say which,  then maybe if something was coming in/going out that was for some reason not wanted to be identified then the inspecting Thai officer would be paid off. We don't know of course but stranger things have happened.

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A material Safety data sheet is of course useful, but the container should have had a Hazchem or Hazmat sign applied to it that is easier to understand and provides adequate information in pictorial form, to cope with an emergency. In addition one would have thought that any hazardous materials imported into Thailand would be subject to some form of control and inspection before the ship was allowed to berth and the MSDS provided up front

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I hope the BMTA didn't have any of their Chinese NGV buses loaded on that ship.... :sleep:

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2 hours ago, balo said:

You're not in Bangkok anymore? Maybe less pollution there. 

As you can see "Location : Sri Racha", I no longer live in Bangkok.

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Looks like the fire was forward. Container ship. Have the bridge etc at the rear. This is Thailand. They have an Admiral running the port, what would an Admiral know on running a commercial trading port.

first off.

1: get the documents with the container contents.

2: Or contact the Hong Kong port, one of the mot organised commercial ports in the world. They will give the Thai authorities the contents of the containers. And even the container numbers and where on the deck the containers were chained down.

 

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6 hours ago, apalink_thailand said:

It would help if people spent 5 minutes actually reading an MSDS. They might then have a clue (1) how to pack it and store it (2) how to protect from human exposure and what the effects and 1st aid will be (3) how to put out a fire in this chemical (4) how to protect the local environment (waterways). But no....reading it is not important.

 

Agree, but prior to read an MSDS you need to know what it is ...

 

"What chemical it was was not known"

 

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, bubba said:

What would help even more would be determining what the chemical is so that someone can look up the associated MSDS (or SDS).

It will be in the ship's manifest as well as the Shipper's Declaration for Dangerous Goods. First thing anyone (except the press) looks at. Captain is well aware and has checked all even before departure, port is aware of it when the manifest is declared 24-28 hours before arrival. 

 

I am really really glad that none of the "superheros" in this thread are involved is the accident relief effort.

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