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Public warned as huge chemical fire breaks out at Laem Chabang port

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2 hours ago, onthemoon said:

Of course it was known while still burning - the fire fighters look at the documents before deciding what substance to use to extinguish the fire. The Shipper's Declaration also contains the emergency phone number (available 24/7 during transport) they can call in case of any questions. That number does not belong to some manager but to the chemist at shipper. 

 

There are very strict international regulations with regards to the transportation of dangerous goods, nothing is left to guesswork. And the Thai ports are indeed on international level with regards to such accidents.

Next time anyone goes to the pool shop to buy this incredably dangerous chemical if they can't supply you with an MSDS then just refuse to buy it.

WTBULKTAB300-500x500.jpg

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1 hour ago, Catkiwi said:

It is a "Hong Kong" ship so why would the Thais have an MSDS for something in a container that was earlier reported to be in transit to Vietnam. Waffling on about who can read English or not is pretty much irrelevant. 

someone mentioned people should read the msds for info, I just pointed out it's written in English so it's useless unless you can read technical English, so it is highly relevant - 

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4 hours ago, NanLaew said:

Doesn't matter really since I have read that Porntipa Taweenuch, the port director, already has all the MSDS's in the world, ever, on her iPhone.

Huawei P30 Pro.

 

Don't forget the Chinese have taken over.

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6 hours ago, onthemoon said:

Of course it was known while still burning - the fire fighters look at the documents before deciding what substance to use to extinguish the fire. The Shipper's Declaration also contains the emergency phone number (available 24/7 during transport) they can call in case of any questions. That number does not belong to some manager but to the chemist at shipper. 

 

There are very strict international regulations with regards to the transportation of dangerous goods, nothing is left to guesswork. And the Thai ports are indeed on international level with regards to such accidents.

Finally a knowledgeable post. 

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Posted (edited)
8 hours ago, spidermike007 said:

Yes, sorry to offend a junta apologist, but she was appointed by the regime.

 

Company Position
Director, President and Deputy Chief Executive Officer
Date of Appointment
25 May 2017 

Link? Sorry but don't believe anything on Thai Visa without a link to prove. 

Edited by marcusarelus

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11 hours ago, spidermike007 said:

One word. Competence.

You didn't answer my question: How could the harbour master have prevented the accident? Since you are so competent, please enlighten us.

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11 hours ago, overherebc said:

It's a mind set nowadays. 

One idiot low down on the chain does something wrong and everybody starts baying for the head of the top guy.

Who in the port did anything wrong?

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10 hours ago, overherebc said:

Next time anyone goes to the pool shop to buy this incredably dangerous chemical if they can't supply you with an MSDS then just refuse to buy it.

WTBULKTAB300-500x500.jpg

Whether dangerous or not, any chemical has an MSDS. If it is not dangerous for transport, section 14 will say so. This particular substance happens to be classified as a dangerous good for transport. Whether you like it or not.

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Posted (edited)
9 hours ago, from the home of CC said:

someone mentioned people should read the msds for info, I just pointed out it's written in English so it's useless unless you can read technical English, so it is highly relevant - 

Believe me, the relevant people in the Thai ports are well trained in reading MSDS. 

Edited by onthemoon

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Is the fire out yet?

 

All this hot air won't be helping.

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1 hour ago, onthemoon said:

Believe me, the relevant people in the Thai ports are well trained in reading MSDS. 

As the fire was on board a container ship, and appears to involve containers some of which may not loaded or off load at this port should it not be the responsibility of the ship's captain and his officers to:

  1. Initiate fire fighting
  2. Identify the container(s) involved, their contents and hazards
  3. Identify any hazards to firefighters
  4. Inform the the port authority of any contamination risk

 

  

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10 hours ago, onthemoon said:

You didn't answer my question: How could the harbour master have prevented the accident? Since you are so competent, please enlighten us.

Need I say more?

 

So, why, on Saturday were the following statements sent out.................

 

Preliminary investigations have not found any toxic chemicals at Laem Chabang Port, which suffered a disruption due to a fire on Saturday morning, the director of Thailand Port Authority, Kamolsak Phromprayoon, said.

 

The department, however, said those goods were neither smuggled into the country nor were falsely declared, he said .

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10 hours ago, onthemoon said:

Who in the port did anything wrong?

It's a general mindset. 

Not directed to any particular place of work. 

Happens regularly in O & G and construction.

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Posted (edited)
12 hours ago, onthemoon said:

Believe me, the relevant people in the Thai ports are well trained in reading MSDS. 

'everyone' that that has dealings with these chemicals should be well versed not just those deemed 'relevant' , for the tendency is that management will make decisions based on costs (for instance, who's relevant) not safety especially in S.E. Asia.

Edited by from the home of CC
  • Confused 1

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possibly with chemicals on board someone knowledgeable 

is required when shipping chemicals. Friend works at co.

sells/delivers all type of fuel. Driver have to go through safety 

courses yearly and pass them.

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